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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug. 22, 2005
    Posts
    3,788

    Default Garage sale find -- WHAT to do with it?!?!?!?

    I've brought home a lot of "odd" things from garage sales, but today, I think I outdid myself.

    I'm now the befuddled owner of a WHOLE SHEEPSKIN!!!!

    The thought occured to me that there might be some horsey things I could make out it that I could sell (ebay/whatever). Next thought was that maybe I should forego horsey and try to find something mainstream and marketable projects, but that would be beyond the scope of this board I guess.

    Ideas?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    May. 16, 2001
    Location
    Alaska. Not in an Igloo.
    Posts
    8,993

    Default

    I'd be making my doggie a cozy new bed, but thats just me
    Seig Heil Polo Shirt!



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb. 5, 2006
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    1,404

    Default

    Saddle pad (to go between the saddle and the horse).

    Saddle pad (to go between the saddle and your butt).

    Girth cover.

    I don't know how much you can get out of just one sheepskin.
    Incredible Invisible



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct. 28, 2004
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    2,971

    Default

    DEFINITELY keep it. You could make halter covers, and the things Quin mentioned. Or you could use it after you groom your horse.
    Horsey Stick Art clique
    Crayolaposse~ SparklyLime
    PPP Grand-Poobah



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    40,173

    Default

    The deed to our farm, with a map and the corners marked as what was under those big boulders, like a triangular piece of dark blue glass and two well described nails under the SW one, all that was drawn on an old piece of sheepskin, dated 1721.

    Maybe you could use your sheepskin also for something like that, a keepsake of places, dates and/or people?



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2009
    Posts
    570

    Default

    We have half a dozen sheep skins covering our chairs and recliners, including an unusual spotted sheep skin from a Jacob's Four Horned Sheep. They are very nice to snuggle into in the winter, and even though June is half over, it's still cold enough at times that I've left them out. The cats love them, too.

    You will see advice that suggests you can wash them. I don't recommend this, as they tend to mat and turn icky. I tumble them in the dryer on air occasionally to shake loose debris. My sister washed one of hers that she had used as a floor rug, and it was a mess. Our parents were sheep ranchers, so we're always picking up things that are sheep-related or farm-related.

    Sheepskins aren't very good seat cushions. They sell a truckload of them all the time, but analyze the "feel" and you'll realize that on a long ride, you are sinking right through the cush and into the hard seat. They do make great friction - I cut one to fit a trail riding stock saddle and attached it to the saddle, over my closed cell foam cushion. After 50 years of riding, including a lot of endurance and dressage miles, my seat bones aren't very happy on longer rides without their cushion.

    The staple length on the fleece will also affect what you want to do with it. Long fleece tends to mat; short fleece makes a good saddle seat cover. If you decide to make saddle pads, girth tubes, etc., hand wash them, don't launder them in a machine.

    You'll have scraps left over from most projects, and you can run one of them through the machine to see how it does. If the scrap survives without looking like it went through a dog from end to end, you may be able to launder the big pieces.

    A good buy at a yard sale is an opportunity, even if you just drape it over the back of a couch for the cats. Our cats sack out on a muskrat throw consisting of about forty muskrats. One cat gets very affectionate with it and even washes it; another wouldn't even touch it.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
    Location
    NorthEast
    Posts
    24,484

    Default

    No idea what I'd do with it but have to say I'd have bought it too.
    You jump in the saddle,
    Hold onto the bridle!
    Jump in the line!
    ...Belefonte



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb. 10, 2007
    Location
    SE Wisconsin
    Posts
    2,053

    Default

    That's a very cool rummage sale find. I would definitely have bought it, too.

    I rarely find anything really interesting at rummage sales. Useful stuff, sometimes, but not interesting or rare stuff. I guess I don't go to the right sales!

    Kim
    I loff my Quarter horse clique

    I kill threads dead!



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep. 17, 2003
    Location
    AridZona
    Posts
    2,874

    Default

    Wrap baby bunting in? Only apparently that was a hare skin ... the horsey illustrations are pretty decent in this.

    http://ia331302.us.archive.org/2/ite...-h/19177-h.htm

    http://www.archive.org/stream/heydid...age/4/mode/1up

    Sorry - my mind drifts ...
    Delicious strawberry flavored death!



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov. 22, 2003
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    7,136

    Thumbs up

    Put it next to your bed (as a rug, that's what these fleeces are usually used for) so that when you get up, your feetsies sink into wonderful SOFFFFT warmth instead of the shock of floor. Even if you already have carpeting or a rug there, it makes a HUUUUUUUGE difference.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    May. 12, 2008
    Location
    Rocky Point Farm
    Posts
    244

    Default

    I have gone through several. The plan is always elaborate - saddle pads, halter covers etc. In practice, they usually end up over the back of the couch or another chair.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2008
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    794

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Pat9 View Post
    We have half a dozen sheep skins covering our chairs and recliners, including an unusual spotted sheep skin from a Jacob's Four Horned Sheep. They are very nice to snuggle into in the winter, and even though June is half over, it's still cold enough at times that I've left them out. The cats love them, too.

    You will see advice that suggests you can wash them. I don't recommend this, as they tend to mat and turn icky. I tumble them in the dryer on air occasionally to shake loose debris. My sister washed one of hers that she had used as a floor rug, and it was a mess. Our parents were sheep ranchers, so we're always picking up things that are sheep-related or farm-related.

    Sheepskins aren't very good seat cushions. They sell a truckload of them all the time, but analyze the "feel" and you'll realize that on a long ride, you are sinking right through the cush and into the hard seat. They do make great friction - I cut one to fit a trail riding stock saddle and attached it to the saddle, over my closed cell foam cushion. After 50 years of riding, including a lot of endurance and dressage miles, my seat bones aren't very happy on longer rides without their cushion.

    The staple length on the fleece will also affect what you want to do with it. Long fleece tends to mat; short fleece makes a good saddle seat cover. If you decide to make saddle pads, girth tubes, etc., hand wash them, don't launder them in a machine.

    You'll have scraps left over from most projects, and you can run one of them through the machine to see how it does. If the scrap survives without looking like it went through a dog from end to end, you may be able to launder the big pieces.

    A good buy at a yard sale is an opportunity, even if you just drape it over the back of a couch for the cats. Our cats sack out on a muskrat throw consisting of about forty muskrats. One cat gets very affectionate with it and even washes it; another wouldn't even touch it.
    Anytime I've ever bought a sheepskin I have bought the ones which have been treated to be washable. They usually charge me $25 more but well worth it. I put them right in the washer and the dryer and they come out beautiful, not a mat or tangle in them.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
    Location
    NorthEast
    Posts
    24,484

    Default

    Epona...that sheepskin baby bunting may have been one of the reasons infant and toddler mortality was so high in the olden days, LOL!
    Imagine dressing your child up so that it looks and smell like a lamb/sheep complete with ears and sending it outside to play?
    I think these days we'd call that wolf/coyote bait.
    You jump in the saddle,
    Hold onto the bridle!
    Jump in the line!
    ...Belefonte



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec. 18, 2000
    Location
    Near the Itchetucknee.Ft.White Fl.
    Posts
    3,896

    Default

    Epona..

    Those Nursery Rhymes bring back such wonderful childhood memories.

    We would sing them endlessly when I was little girl.

    Thank you for posting them.
    \"I have lived my life-it is nearly done-.I have played the game all round;But I freely admit that the best of my fun I owe it to Horse and Hound\".



  15. #15
    Join Date
    May. 15, 2009
    Location
    Eastern Ontario, CND
    Posts
    2,191

    Default

    Anyone who knits should look at the knit picks catelog, there is a sheep costume just like baby bunting, but looks much more comfortable and safe! Bunny/Bear suit

    We use our sheep skins as rugs, they are so cosy!
    "For some people it's not enough to just be a horse's bum, you have to be sea biscuit's bum" -anon.
    Nes' Farm Blog ~ DesigNes.ca
    Need You Now Equine



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jul. 30, 2005
    Location
    England
    Posts
    10,516

    Default

    They make wonderful rugs.
    Horse Show Names Free name website with over 6200 names. Want to add? PM me!



  17. #17
    Join Date
    May. 4, 2003
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    14,070

    Default

    Perhaps it should have several lives, each one less dignified than the one before - first, while still beautiful, on a chair, then onto the floor, then as a dog bed, then as a saddlepad, then in a sideways turned box on the hay so the barn kitty can have somewhere warm to snuggle, then ..well, I've run out of suggestions.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Oct. 31, 2006
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    1,997

    Default

    I pick them up cheap in yardsales too. My friends and I have found them to be nice for bareback, skin side down on the horse, or just drape them over a saddle for winter riding. They help keep the legs warmer



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