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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun. 23, 2003
    Posts
    233

    Default Removing 'gunk' from bridle

    I have a black dressage bridle that is about 4 years old. It is in great condition, but unfot. the grooms seem to be using WAY to much murphy's soap on it for cleaning, and it lives in fl year round so it has gotten very 'gunky'! I am wondering what I can do to remove it aside from stopping the murphys! Also the noseband has now turned more of a liver chestnut brown, instead of black... any ideas how to fix that?! It is a very expensive hennig, and aside from being a bit off in color, it is in perfect condition. Thanks in advance!!



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb. 12, 2004
    Location
    No. VA
    Posts
    683

    Default

    Don't kill me greasy oil lovers! Castile Soap.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Castile_soap



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec. 2, 2007
    Posts
    839

    Default

    I would use plain warm water and a soft tooth brush. After allowing to dry, I would do a light coating of neatsfoot oil, and repeat the oil if needed until the bridle no longer soaks it up.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep. 8, 1999
    Posts
    1,992

    Default

    I would clean your tack yourself and forget "the grooms."

    Toothbrush, warm water and castile as has been suggested. You may even have to use your fingernail a little (sorry if it harms your manicure.) Once thoroughly clean, use only a teeny bit of regular bar saddle soap and a barely damp sponge to keep clean.

    I own a 26-horse dressage and event barn, and I clean my own tack. Everyday. You can do it, too. Then you won't have anyone to blame for the "gunk."
    \"I refuse to engage in a battle of wits with someone who is unarmed.\"--Pogo



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec. 28, 2008
    Posts
    1,418

    Default

    If it's bad you can 'strip' it with some ammonia in hot water. That worked like a charm on an ancient bridle I found in my basement. I used Castile soap after (and ever since) and it's in great shape now. I would stay away from any oil though. I did one light coat on this bridle and it started the gunk process over again. I don't know if it was just that specific bridle but I don't use oil on any of my tack, just a little hydrophane if I need to darken something and plain old water with a little castile.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul. 27, 2007
    Location
    Behind the Orange Curtain
    Posts
    9,694

    Default

    Castille soap is amazing! I got so much gunk off of my bridle when I started using it!



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan. 25, 2009
    Location
    Rock Chalk!
    Posts
    3,092

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ambrey View Post
    Castille soap is amazing! I got so much gunk off of my bridle when I started using it!
    I haven't tried it, but may have to.

    BTW - isn't there a real name for that "gunk"? I seem to remember that there was one, just not what it was.
    A proud friend of bar.ka.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    May. 21, 2009
    Location
    Arkansas
    Posts
    75

    Default

    I use good ol' Lexol leather cleaner. Using a toothbrush for the tough spots. I put some in a bucket of warm not hot water. Use a sponge to clean. Then use a different sponge to get the rest of the soap off. Wipe and let dry. Then a coat of neatsfoot, two if it really needs it, but you probably wont in florida. Let dry, then a coat of Lexol conditioner. I have a bridle thats close to 20 years old and still in excellent condition!
    "A horse is an Angel without wings"



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug. 7, 2006
    Location
    The not-so-frozen North
    Posts
    1,668

    Default

    Toothbrush and glycerine saddle soap. Scrub scrub scrub.

    The fingernail is always good too.

    Murphy's is great sometimes, but can really yuck up leather if used too often.

    Haven't tried Castile but it sounds good!



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb. 4, 2006
    Posts
    2,954

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hunter Mom View Post
    I haven't tried it, but may have to.

    BTW - isn't there a real name for that "gunk"? I seem to remember that there was one, just not what it was.
    Yup. They're called jockeys.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar. 12, 2006
    Posts
    4,343

    Default

    Leder Combi has a great leather cleaner (I think it is the Leder Combi)- it is non-greasy and really gives you a good clean. It dissolves the dirt which means less scrubbing. It is pricier than castile soap, but it works nicely with their oil as a system. I ran out of it and got into a cycle of castile/hydrophane and my bridle got yicky. Just bought more leder combi and have been just cleaning it, no oil, and a light...light coat of conditioner. It is looking better and feels cleaner.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct. 30, 2004
    Location
    Pine Top side of Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    4,961

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by magnolia73 View Post
    Leder Combi has a great leather cleaner (I think it is the Leder Combi)- it is non-greasy and really gives you a good clean. It dissolves the dirt which means less scrubbing. It is pricier than castile soap, but it works nicely with their oil as a system. I ran out of it and got into a cycle of castile/hydrophane and my bridle got yicky. Just bought more leder combi and have been just cleaning it, no oil, and a light...light coat of conditioner. It is looking better and feels cleaner.
    where did you get the Leder Combi?
    ~ it no longer matters what level I do, as long as I am doing it..~ with many thanks, to Elizabeth Callahan



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep. 12, 2008
    Location
    Central NY
    Posts
    734

    Default

    I constantly have to steer people away from Murphey's Oil Soap. The spray formula has alcohol in it and will RUIN any wood or leather finish. It leaves a gunky residue on any surface you use it on, just an awful product.

    The bottle formula is ok if diluted in water. I use a tablespoon of it in a gallon of water to mop my wood floors occasionally or to wash really dirty furniture found in a barn or attic. I then moisturize the finish after drying.

    But I think overall, it's a tricky product and there's several more foolproof, better products out there.

    Castile soap cakes are getting harder to find! Let's support the company, folks!

    I call any gunk "smegma".



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb. 13, 2005
    Location
    Columbus, OH
    Posts
    6,829

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mary in Area 1 View Post
    I would clean your tack yourself and forget "the grooms."

    Toothbrush, warm water and castile as has been suggested. You may even have to use your fingernail a little (sorry if it harms your manicure.) Once thoroughly clean, use only a teeny bit of regular bar saddle soap and a barely damp sponge to keep clean.

    I own a 26-horse dressage and event barn, and I clean my own tack. Everyday. You can do it, too. Then you won't have anyone to blame for the "gunk."
    I agree with your tack cleaning advice, but other than that, your response was unnecessarily bitchy. If you own a 26-horse dressage and event barn, then surely you're familiar with the concept of sending your horse away for training or to a show circuit many states away. I'm not the OP, but that could very well be her situation. Check your ASSumptions at the door, please.
    ________________________
    Resident COTH saddle nerd. (CYA: Not a pro, just a long-time enthusiast!)
    http://twitter.com/jenlmichaels



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar. 29, 2008
    Posts
    3,059

    Default

    If you put too much Murphy's and not enough water together, that's where the gooey feeling comes from. Their solution probably needs to be watered down some more.


    I like a plain old glycerine soap and toothbrush. The toothbrush really gets all the gunk off. Then I oil with something with a non-oily residue. Hydrophane is my favorite. It is never ever sticky.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jan. 30, 2000
    Location
    SW PA
    Posts
    2,242

    Default

    I had the same problem with bridles here. They were overdone with Lexol and Belvoir Tack Conditioner (more was not better!!!). They actually repelled water, were mooshy and gunky (the sweat was never really cleaned off the undersides and just built up to gunk).
    I used my Hydrophane Leather Cleaner on a sponge and just scrubbed lightly, using my nail where needed to scrape and they so far have returned to feeling like they have a bit more life in them. Castile soap may work the same way for cleaning as mentioned previously.

    Proud to have two Gold Prince POAs!
    Takaupas Top Gold
    Gifts Black Gold Knight



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Mar. 8, 2004
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Posts
    19,997

    Default

    I don't have insanely expensive bridles so maybe I am less apt to baby them that I would more expensive ones but I use the kitchen sponge with the scrubber on one side and the sponge on the other. I have used any number of cleaners and all seem to work fine. I se the sponge side mainly on the bridle itself unless I hit an especially nasty spot. I scrub the heck out of the reins with the scrubber part then rinse them off in the sink and pat dry with a towel. Once they are fully dry I condition it and go from there. I have been doing it that way for over 25 years and have never had a problem with leather breaking or looking bad.
    I remember my daughter's first ever pony club inspection at a dressage rally. I had done all the tack cleaning myself the night before (bad Mom, I know!) as I wanted to make sure it was clean. I was standing a ways away when I heard the inspector ask my daughter who had cleaned her tack. My daughter said my mom did it. I was expecting to hear some critical comment when all of a sudden she exclaimed "Its spotless!!" I Figure I must be doing something right.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Feb. 2, 2007
    Location
    Finland and NJ
    Posts
    2,262

    Default

    I like to use a small mixture of ammonia and hot water. I scrub with a sponge and try and get my fingernails in there to really get all the crap out of the leather. Then I use Lexol leather cleaner and then a nice coat of Hydrophane.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2002
    Location
    West Coast of Michigan
    Posts
    36,321

    Default

    Castile soap and an old soft toothbrush.
    Click here before you buy.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jun. 23, 2003
    Posts
    233

    Default

    THANK U ALL for the responses!! I will have to give the castile a try.... any ideas where to find it?? Thx for the reminder of the Leder and hydro..... I have some of both in the trailer, will have to dig out and use after its 'de junked'! Lol, no worries about ruining a manicure, as my nails arnt as lucky as my horses hooves! And I usually do clean my own tack and prefer it, unfort this has been a year of accidents and ive had multiple fractures in december, back, arm ect. so the tack got neglected!! Thanks everyone!



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