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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May. 1, 2009
    Location
    Rydal, Georgia
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    546

    Default Questions to ask a lesson barn / Tips

    A friend of mine is signing up for horseback riding lessons (English lessons, adult rider: late 20s). I haven't taken lessons in so long that I gave her SOME ideas, but didn't know what else to have her ask/look out for when she visits the barns in her area (Gwinnett county, Georgia in case anyone is wondering).

    Can you guys help me out with some questions to ask/things to look out for?

    One thing I told her is to look for a lesson barn that also teaches horsemanship along with riding (ground handling, grooming, etc.) and not just a place that has the horses "ready to ride" when you get there.

    I also told her not to run out to the nearest store she finds that sells horse items buying things the instructor says. I told her that, with everything else in the world, there are bargains to be found.....even locally.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    May. 15, 2009
    Location
    Eastern Ontario, CND
    Posts
    2,191

    Default

    I think the best thing to do is go for a lesson, see if you like the facility/horses/instructors. Try out a few places and see how things go.

    I think the things to look out for are just things that are going to make you're skin crawl. If the horses don't look healthy or the owner/instructor seems disorganized, RUN!
    "For some people it's not enough to just be a horse's bum, you have to be sea biscuit's bum" -anon.
    Nes' Farm Blog ~ DesigNes.ca
    Need You Now Equine



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb. 11, 2006
    Location
    In the Ozarks....
    Posts
    1,233

    Default

    If she's very very new, give her some idea what a happy, healthy horse looks like. When she visits the barn, she should either watch a lesson or ask to see a school horse or two. If they don't look happy and healthy, run away.

    Any way you or another knowledgeable pal could accompany her to visit some barns?
    Fun equestrian t-shirts designed by a rider like you:
    http://skreened.com/laughinglion



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb. 19, 2009
    Posts
    4,817

    Default

    Oy, I've tried out a lot of barns as a beginner adult rider and I agree that its important to check out the instructors teaching style before signing up. Not a lot of places cater to adults and I've found that they either a)treat me like a kid or b)ignore me. Fortunately, I've since found two barns that are really great! However it was through a lot of trial and error. I basically drove out to a lot of barns, took a few lessons, and determined if I clicked with the instructor. Also, have her make it clear from the beginning what her goals are.

    And make sure they have an adequate bunch of school horses, some places I've seen have a whole bunch of ponies and as a larger adult, that just didn't cut it! Its also important to make sure the facility looks clean and well run.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan. 19, 2008
    Location
    Portland, OR
    Posts
    157

    Default

    Other than the things that have already been mentioned such as the condition of the facility, the horses, and clicking with the instructor, I would also make sure to ask about lesson times. Most bigger barns are fine, but some smaller barns have prohibitive hours for those who work full-time. (ie. aren't open most evenings, or late evenings).



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan. 1, 2008
    Posts
    4,875

    Default

    Go with her and check out the training/quality of the school horses. Boy, the things I've seen...



  7. #7
    Join Date
    May. 1, 2009
    Location
    Rydal, Georgia
    Posts
    546

    Default

    Unfortunately, she is a teacher and is off for the Summer so can run around and do errands during the day.

    She went to a barn today and went ahead and signed up for lessons. I work full time so did not accompany her.

    She's very new to riding, but she knows what healthy horses look like even healthy hooves, etc.

    She had showed me one riding stable's website a couple of months ago, and if she chose that one, I think (based on photos from the website, that is) she will be okay there.



  8. #8

    Default

    Watch out for unnecessary or cruel criticism. Make sure the environment is positive (and you can tell by the way the horses look and the way the students act). Also watch out for students who are progressing too slowly or too quickly as you don't want to spend the next year posting the trot and never cantering or jumping 2' on your third lesson. People fall off but if people are falling off quite frequently, that should also be a red flag.

    Unfortunately, you have to just watch and see. Overly confident trainers who say their students go from beginning WT to showing over fences in three months makes my ears prick.

    I would recommend buying at minimum a pair of paddock boots that fit and a well-fitted helmet. Both are safety precautions and cheap when you face yourself with the alternative (foot stuck in stirrup or helmet coming off in a fall...or both). Also make sure that the tack they use on the horses is properly fitted and that the girth isn't hanging on by a thread.

    If your gut tells you that something isn't right, then it probably isn't.
    HorseStableReview.com - Tell others what you know! Post your barn or review today.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    May. 26, 2005
    Posts
    1,515

    Default

    You might want to have her find out how many lessons with different instructors are taking place at the same time over the same course of fences. There is a local lesson barn around here who has 2+ instructors teaching in the same indoor over the same course during prime time hours. How anyone learns anything or doesn't get killed is beyond me.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb. 2, 2007
    Location
    Finland and NJ
    Posts
    2,262

    Default

    Definitely watch a lesson and talk to other students. You can tell a lot about a trainer's teaching style from watching a lesson and get a sense of the barn atmosphere from talking to other clients. Some barns will allow a free introductory lesson, so asking if they would be willing to provide that is a good idea as well. Take a look at the school horses and see how well they are cared for. Many school horses can get overworked and sour so being at a barn with happy horses is important.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    May. 1, 2009
    Location
    Rydal, Georgia
    Posts
    546

    Default

    She sent me the website on the barn she chose, and I have heard good things about them. They are active in the community and welcome visitors (even those who show up without calling first......during barn hours).

    I got her fitted with a schooling helmet and some boots for now (she's taking western lessons).



  12. #12
    Join Date
    May. 1, 2009
    Location
    Rydal, Georgia
    Posts
    546

    Default

    Just an update for you guys.

    My friend is doing well. She started out doing two western riding lessons (as that is what she grew up riding), but then she and her instructor made the decision to switch to English riding instead (I told her, "welcome to the dark side" ) She is really enjoying it, loves her instructor and got to see someone ride a Paso Fino the other day. She's hooked.

    Can anyone give me some GOOD beginner/refresher books I can suggest to her? She got one book, and she said it seemed good, but when she read some things out of it to me, they were incorrect - lol.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr. 22, 2008
    Posts
    804

    Default

    Centered Riding and Hunter Seat Equitation are my two favorites - they encompass pretty much all levels of riding, IMO



  14. #14
    Join Date
    May. 1, 2009
    Location
    Rydal, Georgia
    Posts
    546

    Default

    Cool - she got something like "How to make the most out of your horseback riding lesson," and for the most part, it seems like a good book except there's one part about leg yielding that says, "if you want to move a horse to the right, apply pressure with your right leg."



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec. 18, 2008
    Location
    SE, PA
    Posts
    1,074

    Default

    It's so refreshing to see some of the posts here! I run a primarily all adult lesson program, because I live in an area surrounded by farms that are overrun with kids. I know as an adult I try to make my barn and lessons fun, quiet, encouraging, confidence building and stress free. Nothing against kids, and I don't turn them away, but I do state up front that I cater to adult riders and their unique needs.

    Good luck to your friend & kudos to you for helping her!
    Our horses know our secrets; we braid our tears into their manes and whisper our hopes into their ears.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jul. 10, 2008
    Posts
    1,068

    Default

    For anyone starting out on the dark side (english), adults included, I would recommend reading the pony club manual - it just explains so much for both horse care and proper riding technique/aids.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    May. 1, 2009
    Location
    Rydal, Georgia
    Posts
    546

    Default

    Donkey -

    I hadn't thought about that. I will buy her a copy



  18. #18
    Join Date
    May. 15, 2009
    Location
    Eastern Ontario, CND
    Posts
    2,191

    Default

    I have read the pony club manual so many times it's falling apart (even with my little butterfly stickers still on it, I've had it a LONG time) - it is an excellent resource! I still learn things when I pick it up.

    I wouldn't overwhelm her with too much reading though, I really feel horseback riding is a sport where too much is writen and not enough is done, you must learn by doing!
    "For some people it's not enough to just be a horse's bum, you have to be sea biscuit's bum" -anon.
    Nes' Farm Blog ~ DesigNes.ca
    Need You Now Equine



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