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  1. #1
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    Jun. 26, 2000
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    I live in Chantilly, VA but I ride in Anytown, USA
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    Default Anyone have a non-cribber suddenly turn into a cribber?

    Is it possible that a horse that never cribbed before, who might have ulcers (will find out), suddenly start to crib after becoming stressed?

    Anyone have any that don't otherwise crib?
    Last edited by Anyplace Farm; Jun. 22, 2009 at 07:55 PM. Reason: To give an update

    "If you have the time, spend it. If you have a hand, lend it. If you have the money, give it. If you have a heart, share it." by me



  2. #2
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    Jan. 8, 2007
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    My 1st horse suddenly became a cribber and he was not around other cribbers. I had moved him from a small, kind of chaotic farm to my parents private, 10 acre farm, with 3 other laid back horses when he started this behavior. Looking back, I would bet anything he had ulcers-he was off the track, but I just didn't know otherwise. It also followed treatment for Lyme Disease, was on both Tetracycline and Doxy, and as a 1st time horse owner, and 15 years old, I didn't know about ulcers or that a probiotc would've been smart.



  3. #3
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    Jun. 26, 2000
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    Just got this guy last night. Night time hauling, 3 hr drive, didn't pull into the farm until 1230A. Past owner swears he doesn't crib (he's from the track though) and I had the oppty to observe the horse in his stall before and after seeing him ridden and he did not show any desire to crib. No cribbing strap marks but that might not mean anything.

    So, I'm wondering if ulcer flare ups from the stress of the trip did it. And of course, hoping that with some GastroGuard, and settling in, this goes away. I'm not down with the cribbing. To me, you might as well have a heroin addict in your barn. It rubs me that wrong. Ack!!

    "If you have the time, spend it. If you have a hand, lend it. If you have the money, give it. If you have a heart, share it." by me



  4. #4
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    May. 21, 2009
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    My horse has ulcer's but he never cribbed, though I'm sure stress could be the cause of cribbing, but mainly boredom. At the farm, does your horse have something to play with, like a jolly ball?
    ~He dares to be a fool, and that is the first step in the direction of wisdom~
    -James Huneker



  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by HowDoYouLikeMeNow View Post
    My horse has ulcer's but he never cribbed, though I'm sure stress could be the cause of cribbing, but mainly boredom. At the farm, does your horse have something to play with, like a jolly ball?
    Not yet. We literally just got him last night. I'm really, really hoping this is a passing thing but will proactively move on this with a scoping and treatment for ulcers if I have to. Have never had a cribber and detest them (as much as I hate to say that).

    He was very stressed when he came in, understandably so. Now I feel bad that I didn't sedate him a bit for the trip and give him GastroGuard at the outset of the trip.

    He'd grab a bite of his midnight snack, then wheel over to the stall guard, give it a tug, then wheel over to the window, look out, grab some hay, then swing back over to his bucket and so on. Poor guy.

    "If you have the time, spend it. If you have a hand, lend it. If you have the money, give it. If you have a heart, share it." by me



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun. 11, 2007
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    Minnesota
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    Gus became a die-hard cribber after tearing his CCL last year. Was on stall rest plus bute for about 6 weeks... that's what did it. In hindsight, he may have had ulcers and I did put him on a few different "tummy" meds. Cribbing stopped 100% when moved to new boarding barn and pasture 24/7. No more crib collar - and he was wearing it up until the day he left the old barn, 5 weeks ago.

    So, yep, stress can cause ulcers, among other things. For Gus, cribbing was his outlet. He never showed any other issues... and everything eventually resolved on it's own.

    FYI, he was never a cribber before the injury.
    Proud owner of Gus & Gringo.
    See G2's blog
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  7. #7
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    Mar. 6, 2009
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    I say if you detest cribbers to that extreme *you seriously consider taking him back - IMMEDIATELY--some of us can simply not stand cribbers - I being one! I swore I would never have one and actually bred one-! I thought I had him sold - very nice gelding and people thought they would win everything with him - but they rushed him and ruined him - so I bought him back as they had him on the truck to slaughter!!!! because they could not be patient and ---took them three days to get the back band on him and they hitched him the fourth day - were surprised when they CRASHED * STUPID PEOPLE!! Anyway I have him back and regret it - but did not want him to be killed . So he is living here in the far pasture and shed with one buddy - for life. But I felt I had to as I bred him - before you are emotionally involved take him back !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! IMO. And if you don't take him back and he needs a cribbing pony buddy - contact me and I"ll send Sonic your way free of charge! That should indicate something right there. So sorry this has happened to you.
    Zu Zu Bailey " IT"S A WONDERFUL LIFE !"



  8. #8
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    Jun. 26, 2000
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zu Zu View Post
    I say if you detest cribbers to that extreme *you seriously consider taking him back - IMMEDIATELY--some of us can simply not stand cribbers - I being one! I swore I would never have one and actually bred one-! I thought I had him sold - very nice gelding and people thought they would win everything with him - but they rushed him and ruined him - so I bought him back as they had him on the truck to slaughter!!!! because they could not be patient and ---took them three days to get the back band on him and they hitched him the fourth day - were surprised when they CRASHED * STUPID PEOPLE!! Anyway I have him back and regret it - but did not want him to be killed . So he is living here in the far pasture and shed with one buddy - for life. But I felt I had to as I bred him - before you are emotionally involved take him back !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! IMO. And if you don't take him back and he needs a cribbing pony buddy - contact me and I"ll send Sonic your way free of charge! That should indicate something right there. So sorry this has happened to you.
    Like you, I'm one of those people that accepts responsibility of ownership. So, I own him and that's it. He's mine and I'll work with it. My BO has watched him this a.m. and only saw him tug on the stall guard once. He is very stressed so I think he's just doing it out of the newness of everything. We're going to do a week of GastroGuard to help calm things in his tummy down and he has free choice hay and some forage hay in his bucket to mess with. He hasn't pulled on his bucket so that is a good sign. We are also hanging a taller stall guard which will mean he'll have nothing to hook onto (but his bucket). We're kind of doing a wait-and-see for now.

    He's a lovely horse and I've waited a long time for him so I'm going to remain patient for now.

    "If you have the time, spend it. If you have a hand, lend it. If you have the money, give it. If you have a heart, share it." by me



  9. #9
    Join Date
    May. 20, 2003
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    Middleburg, VA
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    My OTTB turned into a cribber, and the woman I bought her from said she had no vices, and the original ad when the lady bought her off the track also said no vices. She had a very stressful shipping experience from NY to VA, so I would say, absolutely, it's possible. She only does it when she's in her stall and eating, not when she's outside, and she's not particularly distructive (not to mention the *sweetest* horse), so I shrug it off (and she's so thin-skinned I couldn't put a collar on her w/o horrendous rubs resulting). I had her checked for ulcers, and she didn't have a one, go figure.
    Cherry Blossom Farm - Show & Field Hunters, Side Saddles



  10. #10
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    Dec. 19, 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anyplace Farm View Post
    Is it possible that a horse that never cribbed before, who might have ulcers (will find out), suddenly start to crib after becoming stressed?

    Anyone have any that don't otherwise crib?
    One of my mares will crib when she's in pain (no ulcers). As the pain reduces, so will the cribbing. Pain gone, no more cribbing.



  11. #11
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    This is all starting to sound a little more encouraging. Poor guy is completely wigged out right now. I know he'll settle but boy do I hate this period of acclimation (sp?).

    "If you have the time, spend it. If you have a hand, lend it. If you have the money, give it. If you have a heart, share it." by me



  12. #12
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    Default

    Can he see other horses?



  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Equibrit View Post
    Can he see other horses?
    Yes. I'm sure that is both helping him but also whipping him up into a frenzy. He's only lived two places in his life, the farm where he was bred, he lived for his first two or three years and Penn Nat'l for the last year or so. He's 5.

    Two mares are in with him today and the boys are outside. He can see through both sides of the barn and has a nice, big airy stall.

    Poor guy. All the new smells, new sights, new 'people' and not being equipped with the best brain has to be a bit of a challenge.

    "If you have the time, spend it. If you have a hand, lend it. If you have the money, give it. If you have a heart, share it." by me



  14. #14
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    Dec. 19, 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anyplace Farm View Post
    This is all starting to sound a little more encouraging. Poor guy is completely wigged out right now. I know he'll settle but boy do I hate this period of acclimation (sp?).
    The root cause of cribbing in 99% of the cases are boredom and stress. Your guy just moved - if he wasn't already addicted, he's probably stressed out. Spend a lot of bonding time with him to help him settle in.



  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by luvmywalkers View Post
    The root cause of cribbing in 99% of the cases are boredom and stress. Your guy just moved - if he wasn't already addicted, he's probably stressed out. Spend a lot of bonding time with him to help him settle in.
    Will be headed out there this evening and will do some grooming, etc.

    "If you have the time, spend it. If you have a hand, lend it. If you have the money, give it. If you have a heart, share it." by me



  16. #16
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    Mar. 5, 2009
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    I know what you mean about 'hating the acclimation period." I adopted an older OTTB last fall, and this poor guy was so misserable for the first 3 months! He was a 'stall spinner' and 'fence-line walker' and WOULD NOT settle down no matter what I did. Time was my best friend...and ignoring most of the stuff he did (because it drove me nuts). I made sure that he was 'safe' and had to just let him work it out. At the 3 month mark, a switch flipped, and he stopped grinding his bedding into a sea of AAK, and is now the cleanest horse I have. I'll bet your new guy is just one of those horses who can't handle change, and the 'cribbing' will stop as soon as he feels safe and comfortable in his new digs.



  17. #17
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    Aug. 22, 2002
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    I had one home grown horse that just started one day (after an injury, lots of anti-inflammatories, antibiotics and confinement). Treating for ulcers got rid of most of it.

    Bought another one off the track. I was with the horse for 8 hours in his track environment, never even a hint of cribbing, it makes DH crazy, so I was looking for signs. Got the horse home and he cribbed, worse when his body or stomach hurt. It never went away. He died on the operating table of an entrapment that cribbers are 10xs more likely to have than non-cribbing horses.

    I used to say I could live with it, but I am not sure I could do it again.



  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by TBMaggie View Post
    I know what you mean about 'hating the acclimation period." I adopted an older OTTB last fall, and this poor guy was so misserable for the first 3 months! He was a 'stall spinner' and 'fence-line walker' and WOULD NOT settle down no matter what I did. Time was my best friend...and ignoring most of the stuff he did (because it drove me nuts). I made sure that he was 'safe' and had to just let him work it out. At the 3 month mark, a switch flipped, and he stopped grinding his bedding into a sea of AAK, and is now the cleanest horse I have. I'll bet your new guy is just one of those horses who can't handle change, and the 'cribbing' will stop as soon as he feels safe and comfortable in his new digs.
    I hope. I'm very stressed about stressing my BO/good friend. I have to imposition people. She's being great but heavens knows what he might stir up over the course of the next few days.

    "If you have the time, spend it. If you have a hand, lend it. If you have the money, give it. If you have a heart, share it." by me



  19. #19
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    Aug. 22, 2002
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    Quote Originally Posted by TBMaggie View Post
    At the 3 month mark, a switch flipped
    We call that taking the deep breath. It takes all of them a different period of time to take theirs.



  20. #20
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    Mar. 19, 2009
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    Maybe your horse needs a mineral that is found in the wood. Try feeding a balanced diet and this might go away.



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