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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan. 1, 2005
    Location
    Lewes, DE
    Posts
    660

    Default Help with chain link fence issue .!.!.!.!.!

    This is honestly the last time I choose to listen to a contractor and not have done what I know should be done ... However, now I'm stuck and I am reaching out to others to see what advice they have. We had a chain link fence installed so the dogs would have a secure back yard. I wanted some type of panel fence and I wanted into the ground because my yorkie can get under the smallest rise. Yet the stupid fence company told me I didn't need to spend that much money, the chain link fence would be perfect for what we're doing and it would be secure to the ground. Yeah right, real funny. $1350 later we have since repaired the crap out of it because it wasn't secure to the ground and the dogs either just lifted it or dug enough to just get out. Yet again I've tried to explain to my husband that we should just suck it up, dig a trench, and cement the perimeter. "That's too much work" blah blah blah blah is all I hear. Tonight, the dogs got out again, at a normal problem spot. It doesn't help that we now have obnoxious neighbors who let their 4 yr old son (approximately) run wild in the neighborhood not to mention scream, torment, and throw things at the dogs. And thus, the problem side ....... the side towards the neighbor's.

    I can't afford to put in another new fence, this one isn't even a year old. All the extra money we've put towards it, we could've done the fence I wanted from the beginning. But god no, let's not listen to me ! I'm sorry to rant and rave, I need to vent Does anyone have any ideas as to how we can secure the bottom of this fence ?

    Thanks :/
    R.I.P. Barbaro
    Good luck Nicanor & Lentenor !



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb. 16, 2003
    Location
    MI USA
    Posts
    7,431

    Default

    Pavers along the edge should prevent digging. These would be the larger pavers, 12" x 12". They have been advertised for $1.50 on sale locally. Maybe you could find some slate pieces that are being removed for remodeling. Use them against the fence to prevent digging.

    I have chicken wire outside my electric to keep the Corgi inside. She is not much of a digger, just pushed thru the electric with her heavy winter coat to get to the barn, so chicken wire on electric posts keeps her inside.

    Can you string electric on the inside of chain link?

    Hog panels from the farm store, could be put along the fence, have enough weight that they could not be pushed upward. I think they have closely spaced wires on the bottom, so even little dog can't get thru.

    Not sure if you could rent a trencher to make a little ditch along the outside or inside of fence. You could put the chicken wire down in the ditch, anchor the top to the chain link, and bury it. Dog will continue to hit wire, even if they try to dig under. We had to go down two ft with the wire to keep our GSDs in their kennel, tunneled like they were in prison escape! "Normal" dogs, a foot deep wire is usually enough depth.

    Perhaps a landscaper could sell you some plastic stakes, to stake the wire down at the bottom of trench, in case dog does dig and pull on it with claws. Such stakes SHOULD help keep the bottom wire in place with dirt covering them. Flares on the stakes resist pulling from the top side.

    Not sure if a layer of dirt over the fence bottom of chain link, then pavers over the dirt, would help keep chain link down better. Maybe a light pipe on the bottom, like on the top, to anchor the bottom of fence fabric down to. Our chain link fabric has sunk into rising dirt as years have passed, appears buried now.

    The pavers helped with my mother's dog, who dug like a rodent! Big as she was, she didn't move the pavers clawing at them. Edges of the pen stayed nice, her personal sidewalk, but the middle looked like it was bombed with craters and piled up dirt. We just rototilled it smooth a couple times a year. It was sandy fill, easy to work.

    Hope some of these are helpful ideas. Just maddening when you try so hard to have a nice place for the dogs and they DO NOT appreciate it! And some extra curses on your contractor for not doing what you wanted in the first place.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan. 1, 2005
    Location
    Lewes, DE
    Posts
    660

    Default

    Thank you sooooo much for your helpful ideas ! I'll be printing them out tomorrow and starting on pricing and such. Hubby just came in after I posted this and was like, maybe a trench with cement and block would work ... I just looked at him and flat out said, yeah, you mean like I suggested awhile ago and was told it was too much work and wouldn't work ? Still a little irritated as you can tell, lol ...
    R.I.P. Barbaro
    Good luck Nicanor & Lentenor !



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec. 1, 1999
    Location
    flyover country
    Posts
    2,171

    Default chain link and clever dogs-not a good mix :mad:

    I called them Houdini and Pegasus as they went running down the street giving me the doggie finger...."Houdini"-Amy, dug, and was prepared to go to China to escape. "Pegasus" or Auggie, would climb...I tried putting rocks in their favorite spots, it would work for awhile, then they would dig nearby. They could always get out but were puzzled by rentry. I also tried sticking bent wire like croquet hoops across the bottom. Maybe with a Yorkie, he/she couldn't pull it out, but maybe cement would be the best. After years, I finally got WOOD. NO MORE ESCAPES. No climbing, no digging. Good luck, you will need it.
    Another killer of threads



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2005
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    9,038

    Default

    The previous owner of my house apparently did the inner chain link near the house himself (and did exactly the kind of job you think), and one place was too high and their poodle tried to dig out-they put a pipe (fence pipe like the top rail is) on the ground and secured it exactly the way they did the top. I also secured the chain link fence sections to the pipe frame on top and bottom with the metal fence ties (you can buy bags of them at the hardware store in the fencing section because they barely had the chain link connected to the top pipe. It's very easy to do the fence ties to make the fence less mobile (I did them every foot or so on the top part) and the bottom might secure it enough also. I think for the bottom I would use the pavers-you won't have to use a weed eater on that fence line if you do the inside and outside sections. Also if you use the 12" pavers on both sides of the fence they would have to tunnel 2' to escape (don't forget to put pavers on both sides around the gate too-it's easy to adjust the gate height if necessary).
    You can't fix stupid-Ron White



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    42,252

    Default

    We have chain link, but we got the panels, so the bottom has a pipe.
    Since we are trying to keep critters OUT, some of them wild pigs, as much as dogs in, we did put a concrete footing also:

    http://s13.photobucket.com/albums/a2...2-20-07810.jpg



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar. 12, 2006
    Posts
    1,316

    Default

    if you put a concrete footer remember that it will collect and channel water. Don't channel it into your foundation or basement steps.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb. 8, 2002
    Posts
    4,960

    Default

    We have chain link on top of a small slope that is planted with iceplant (groundcover) and the iceplant is growing from both sides up onto the fence about a foot. It's a perfect deterent for the wee Jack Russell, otherwise known as Houdini.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan. 1, 2005
    Location
    Lewes, DE
    Posts
    660

    Default

    Thank you all for your help Hopefully we can find something that will help these guys out... Its just frustrating... I don't want to do too much to the fence as we plan on building and moving within the next 3 yrs. But I want a secure place for the dogs to run and play. I would just rather NOT have to put in a brand new fence, lol Well, off to work, then I guess I'm spending my day in the local Lowes to start pricing out plenty of stuff :/
    R.I.P. Barbaro
    Good luck Nicanor & Lentenor !



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov. 22, 2003
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    7,136

    Default

    Camping stakes, used to attach tents to the ground, have a "hook" that can be used to secure the chain links to the ground. Put the hook around the wire and push the stake into the ground.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2004
    Location
    Pottstown, PA (East Coventry)
    Posts
    3,171

    Default

    When we moved into our house there was a chain link fence without a bottom pipe and whoever installed it had the posts too far apart. We just used landscape ties & old 4x4s that we drilled and nailed into the ground with either rebar or the big spikes that look like nails. It was much easier to weedeat the fenceline on the side that had the boards.
    You can always take the landscape ties/4x4s with you when you move. They can become nice cavellettis or raised flower beds.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul. 14, 2003
    Location
    Rhode Island
    Posts
    1,850

    Default

    We're having a chain link fence installed and our contractor suggested a cable on the bottom . We have larger dogs ( GSPs) and they won't be spending huge amounts of time in the area, just morning "bathroom time" and last thing at night. they won't be unsupervised as they can certainly get in to enough trouble given enough free time. How about sections of border fencing that you can secure into the ground either inside or outside the fencing? hOME DEPOT has what they call rabbit fencing that isn't too expensive. All else fails, how about a little strand of hot wire and an inexepensive charger/?Or, get a do it yourself "invisible " fencing kit and install the wiring above ground "yorkie" height. A collar for each might deter them .



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr. 1, 2003
    Location
    Cocoa, Fla
    Posts
    4,227

    Default

    Put a hot wire inside the fence - high enough dogs can't go over, low enough they can't go under. And if it's dry - wet the perimeter by the hot wire so the first time they test it they get zapped badly.
    Sandy in Fla.



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