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  1. #1
    RM1908 Guest

    Default Mad at barn that has my horse in training

    Need help
    Am I over reacting... What should I do
    I dropped my horse off yesterday at a training barn about 5 min away from my house ( one of the main reasons I chose this place was because it was close so I could check on progress)

    Well I showed up unannounced not even 24 hours later and my horse is in the barn by himself (all the others are turned out ) and he is panicked sweating, snorting and wide eyed... his stall is filthy and his auto water is bone dry and doesn't appear to be working at all
    The time is 10:30 ( the rest of the horses were turned out at 8:30)
    I find 2 girls cleaning paddocks and that's it no one else is around
    when I get the trainer on the phone I am told that the other trainer didn't tell the girls what to do with this new horse so they just left him in the stall
    Now he is highly sensitive and easily frightened (hence the training)
    I was told that sometimes the autowater float does get stuck and water doesn't come out
    Am I being unreasonable to expect that if you know the waterer is screwy that you damn well put a bucket of water in for the horse as back up
    I was afraid that he would be scared of it and asked for a bucket to be put in the first place
    And to have 20 other horses taken out of the barn and leave him in by himself really pissed me off
    Should I take him home or calm down and just check on him every day
    I feel like I should be able to trust that he will get cared for properly, without having to inspect
    Opinions please
    thanks
    Last edited by RM1908; May. 17, 2009 at 08:30 PM.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2007
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    10,359

    Default

    While the bit about leaving him in wouldn't be a deal-breaker for me (if they don't know where to put him, better that than guessing and sticking him in with someone that doesn't get along with him) I would be VERY concerned about the water. Uh..if they know it doesn't sometimes work, yes, put in a bucket, plus, maybe, FIX IT? I think horses need to be able to learn to deal with something like being alone in the barn, but they can't exactly deal without having water.

    But you should go and inspect anyway. Even if you didn't have any concerns about care.



  3. #3
    RM1908 Guest

    Default

    As part of the contract each horse is to have their own paddock
    and he had been in the stall for 24 hours (he is never stalled at home, he has an in and out) so that is what had me pretty mad ... but your right not a deal breaker



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar. 29, 2008
    Posts
    3,059

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    Hmmm, sounds like a simple request for a bucket that they didn't follow thru on. If it were me, I'd be making another surprise visit, and depending on what I found then, I might be bringing horsey back home.

    Hopefully wires just got crossed this time, and they'll fix things. But I'd keep popping in unannounced just to make sure.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    May. 11, 2009
    Location
    Oregon
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    21

    Default

    Hello all! I'm new to the forum and introduced myself on the trailriding thread several days ago. This topic caught my eye as I recently had a similar discussion with a friend who was unhappy after moving her horse to a new facility.
    RM, so sorry you're in this situation, I feel badly for your horse's experience. My personal opinion is that when a horse is brought into a new barn
    ( especially a professional trainer's ) he should be given some extra time and careful attention so the trainer/BO/barn help have a chance to figure out his needs... especially the stressful days when first moved in. Maybe the help didn't know where to put him, but it's the totally the trainer or barn manager's responsibility to clue everyone in; if he or she is too busy ( not a good excuse, btw ) at least leave a stall card with instructions.
    I may be influenced by all of the BNT horror stories lately, but my horses wouldn't be left in a situation like this. One surprise visit like that would be enough for me.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov. 9, 2005
    Location
    uk
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    15,268

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RM1908 View Post
    As part of the contract each horse is to have their own paddock
    and he had been in the stall for 24 hours (he is never stalled at home, he has an in and out) so that is what had me pretty mad ... but your right not a deal breaker
    could be that yhey are teaching your horse to stand indoors as you say hes in and out and never been in a stable which in come horses with lack of trianing isnt always the best thing lets put it in simple terms if you want to go to a show then the hrose has to go into a trailer or lorry, so stands alone, maybe, or if vets farriers are needed the horse has to learn to stand and be quiet be it in a stable or out in the yard, or even at a show you might want to stay over night so the horse has to learn to be stabled

    plus when new horses come in they should be quarantined fo a while which includes worming them etc

    lots of reasons as for the horse waterer -- can happen with auto feeder but bucket of water should be available
    and it depends on how they run the yard lots of reason and not just one

    it could be your horse as you say panics as hes not very good on his , and needs to be tuaght that sometimes you have to be on your own for various reasons



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2003
    Location
    Shenandoah Valley, VA
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    1,356

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    I don't think you are overreacting. I would be very upset about this. You *asked* for a water bucket (and I'm assuming they said yes to the request?) and they didn't do it. What did you ask them to do as far as training? Will they do it? You are doing the right thing by dropping in unannounced. Keep doing this a few times a day for a few days and then make a decision. If things aren't going as you like, then bring him back home and try to find another situation. Since the barn is so close, is there any chance the trainer can come to your place to do the training sessions? Good luck.

    ps. You need to change the title in your thread. I read it a few times trying to figure out if you found the horse choking in his stall. If that were the case, I would definitely get him out of there. But I think you meant, "checked". Click edit at the bottom of the post and then "go advanced" and you can edit your title.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar. 6, 2009
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    8,507

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    Too much passing the blame already -- you are paying for professional services - care and training- your trainer is the main communicator - He failed..The next trainer failed. The girls failed. * This first day speaks volumes - you have not seen any indication that they want to take care of or have the necessary organization to train your horse. I would be out today! and not pay a red cent! You should not have to check on the horse on a daily basis to see if he has WATER!!!!!~ As Oprah always says -- "Believe the person when they show what they are like the first time don't make them show you again" - something like that. WHY WORRY ??? Find another trainer!!



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar. 13, 2007
    Location
    Northern Virginia, 45 minutes east of paradise - 2 hrs during rush hour
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    2,376

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    Bring him home. Their management practices are in chaos. You risk colic or him becoming sick from the stress. Maybe it will happen, maybe it won't. But they are taking no precautions to keep it from happening.
    "The mighty oak is a nut who stood its ground"

    "...you'll never win Olympic gold by shaking a carrot stick at a warmblood..." see u at x



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
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    Deep South
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    14,564

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    Their lack of concern for your horse is what you should worry about. Go get him.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct. 18, 2000
    Posts
    22,424

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    Hmmmmm...... New horse in for training and folks are not overly concerned about making sure he settles in quietly, not providing water.....

    I'd pick the horse up and take him home.

    Accidents and injuries can happen in the BEST facilities, but I'd hope the facility would have an established routine for easing new horses into the program. That's pretty basic.

    If your gut is telling you this is not the right place for your horse - listen to your gut. There are times when we're being overprotective worry warts - and times when our gut is telling us to take the horse home.

    Good luck.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug. 30, 2000
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
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    I would bring him home. 1-Unacceptable that the trainer failed to leave instructions--not fair to the girls in the barn or the horse. 2-Beyond unacceptable that the horse was left without water. Horse in the barn by himself I would have a problem with, but probably not a deal-breaker--I agree with the earlier poster, better than turning him out in the wrong place. Personally I might have picked a horse that wouldn't mind and left him in as well for company, but it's an understandable situation. In addition to the rest of it, why didn't the girls call you or the trainer for instructions and to notify you that the horse was upset? I would have zero confidence in this place to give my horse acceptable care--you're lucky that you got there and the horse wasn't colicking. I hate to sound so neurotic, but there are plenty of trainers that will give your horse solid training and good care.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb. 22, 2007
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    3,928

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    If you like the trainer otherwise (from your research before bringing the horse in) I'd sit down and have a serious talk with them before deciding what to do. Talk about what happened, why it is unacceptable to you, and that you absolutely want your horse to have a bucket. I think leaving him in is not that bad...like others have said it is better that they did that then stick him out somewhere he shouldn't be. The water would only concern me because you specifically asked for a bucket it sounds like, so that should have been there (I've dealt with auto floats that stick, but while the horse may have been without water for a little while it was never more than an hour between people checking them, except at night when the horses were out with stock tanks anyway). The fact is, wires do sometimes get crossed at busy training barns, even with very good managers. The trainer should be apologetic and willing to work out a plan with you to make sure this never happens again, even if it is something like giving the barn help your number so they can call if they have questions, or posting instructions for him on his stall door.

    If you had any doubts about the barn previously and are just there because it is so close, I would definitely leave. Sometimes mistakes happen, but sometimes trainers don't care so much or barns have a reputation for doing this, and you don't want to be in that situation.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct. 14, 2004
    Location
    Connecticut
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    9,007

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    I'd be picking him up ASAP. They knew the auto waterer's were faulty, yet no one checked on it that morning?

    No one left the girls instructions?

    Sounds like a half assed operation to me.



  15. #15

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RM1908 View Post
    Should I take him home or calm down and just check on him every day
    I feel like I should be able to trust that he will get cared for properly, without having to inspect
    Opinions please
    thanks
    you are already too mad to overlook it....you will believe now that you have to go every day and the staff will hate that....bring him home...

    regards
    Production Acres,Pro A Welsh Cobs
    I am one of the last 210,000 remaining full time farmers in America.We feed the others.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Feb. 23, 2008
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    4,266

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    I would not pack up and leave based solely on that one day. Though it would make me wary, and I would drop in unexpectedly every day for a week.

    The fact is a horse in a new place may pace, fret, sweat, call, poop all over his stall, etc. If they'd turned him out he might have run in circles and got himself in a sweat too, just from seeing all the new scenery and horses.

    Me, I might have left one other horse nearby the first time, with an unfamiliar horse in a new place, but in general if a horse wants to throw a tantrum in his stall (or in the paddock), I let him work it out on his own. At other barns I boarded at in the past, everyone rushed to bring all the horses in if they started running around or got upset, so it's a different approach!

    Waterer - sloppy. I would just spot check for a few days to make sure that's been fixed.

    You have watched the trainer work on other horses right? So you know what his/her approach and technique is?



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
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    NorthEast
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    Agreed, not worth the worry or the convenience of how close it is. Bring him home, find a new place.
    You jump in the saddle,
    Hold onto the bridle!
    Jump in the line!
    ...Belefonte



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Mar. 23, 2008
    Posts
    328

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    I have boarded at both larger barns as well as backyard barns, and I will agree with the poster who wrote that the first day speaks volumes. I understand that people get busy, etc. but if a new horse was coming to my barn I would be damn well sure that I was there to meet the horse, check on the horse, make sure everything with being handled properly. If I had other people taking care of my horses, I would make damn well sure that they knew what was to be done with the new horse and whould want to be there to make sure they were ok handling the horse.


    It is lack of personal care and attention.

    It is my personal opinion, that when you are paying someone else to care for your horse, you should not have to remind them to "care"



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Apr. 9, 2008
    Location
    Alachua, Florida
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    644

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tamara in TN View Post
    you are already too mad to overlook it....you will believe now that you have to go every day and the staff will hate that....bring him home...

    regards
    Maybe so.

    OP don't take this the wrong way because obviously things didn't go smoothly at the farm end of things, and certainly we like to be able to expect that they will, as sometimes you can't personally be on hand to supervise, however...

    Some of this could have been avoided by you.

    I'll assume that you checked barn and trainer out thoroughly before the move. What was the discussion about stalling him since he was used to run-in?

    More importantly, if I'd have been dropping him off, I'd have made sure there was a bucket in the stall before I left, that all his feeding and turn-out instructions were posted (and that this information was likely to get to the morning help), and that I knew where and when he was to be turned out.

    None of this is your job, but if you had made the time, you wouldn't have had such problem in the am, or if you had, you'd know for sure it was time to move since it would be obvious that instructions are not followed in this barn, no second guessing.

    Again OP, not really trying to get on you, but if you are going to be this mad at the barn, I bet you are already a little mad at yourself, so this is in the category of words to the wise for others.

    If you can, I'd take a deep breath, let yourself and the barn off the hook (first strike), and try to start fresh giving them a chance (obviously you thought they were good enough 2 days ago)



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Sep. 17, 2003
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    Fort Myers, Florida
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    Hope you make the decision to pick him up. No horse should be without water..no excuses. IMO a new horse should be given extra attention...not less. That was your first red flag....do you really need more?
    "My treasures do not sparkle or glitter, they shine in the sunlight and nicker to me in the night"



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