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  1. #1
    overwhelmed Guest

    Default Widening out a horse behind...........

    My horse is rope walking behind. How do I get him to widen out?

    Thanks in advance,



  2. #2
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    Feb. 22, 2007
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    Do you have pictures or more details? It could be poor conformation, poor shoeing, poor muscling, or a combination thereof. If his conformation is really bad, there might not be much you can do. If it's just a minor imbalance there may be lots.



  3. #3
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    In addition to confo, shoeing, muscling issues, it can be because the horse has something chiropractically "out" going on, or something neurological
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  4. #4
    overwhelmed Guest

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    He has been moved to a new trainer that has just shod him and trimned him down on the outside behind. He has sounded up and his conformation is great. If I had him shimned on the outside a little and put light weight alumnium shoes on him or let him go barefoot to see where the foot is wearing, would this be wrong? He has never had this problem before he was cut down on the outside.



  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by overwhelmed View Post
    He has never had this problem before he was cut down on the outside.
    Well there ya go

    WHY were his outsides "cut down"?
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  6. #6
    overwhelmed Guest

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    Don't know and the trainer argued with me after he told me he had cut the outside down. Being a woman I hesitated to argue with him but I knew I was right! Thanks a bunch!



  7. #7
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    Trust your female instincts
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  8. #8
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    Jul. 26, 2007
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    overwhelmed in gray

    He has been moved to a new trainer that has just shod him and trimned him down on the outside behind. He has sounded up and his conformation is great. If I had him shimned on the outside a little and put light weight alumnium shoes on him or let him go barefoot to see where the foot is wearing, would this be wrong? He has never had this problem before he was cut down on the outside.

    Hooves turn over to the lowest side (because that's the line of least resistance), and leg swing follows the hoof's weight and length (inertia). If your horse is the least bit base narrow, barefooted or shod, lowering the outside of a hind is bassackwards in terms of biophysics because it will cause breakover to be lateral to the horses midline and leg swing to be medial. Medial leg swing is not a Good Thing because two objects cannot occupy the same space at the same time. In my experience, the setup you've described can cause interference problems in speed horses - and rope walking in horses that don't go fast. YMMV.
    Tom Stovall, CJF
    No me preguntes cualquier preguntas, yo te diré no mentiras.



  9. #9
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    Mar. 28, 2002
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    Quote Originally Posted by overwhelmed View Post
    He has been moved to a new trainer that has just shod him and trimned him down on the outside behind. He has sounded up and his conformation is great. If I had him shimned on the outside a little and put light weight alumnium shoes on him or let him go barefoot to see where the foot is wearing, would this be wrong? He has never had this problem before he was cut down on the outside.
    You said the thing in what I bolded in the quote. That may be the ultimate answer to the problem and this is not an uncommon solution to some gaiting problems with harness horses. Jog them barefoot to see how the foot wears, smooth it and tack on shoes. Frequently they WILL tell you how they want their feet, with the exception of horses that don't grow heel. I always question shoers who insist on tipping a horse inside or outside - it just doesn't work and only accomplishes making a horse ill-gaited, sore or both. Don't try to shim, as you could over compensate and make more trouble, best is to let the foot grow and have that tipping fixed. Trims, in general should be level, tape measure level, not eyeball level. Hope you can get it sorted.
    Founder of the Dyslexic Clique. Dyslexics of the world - UNTIE!!

    Member: Incredible Invisbles



  10. #10
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    The problem with taking the horse barefoot now, with a pretty unbalanced foot from the sounds of it, is that he can't tell you how he wants his feet done, because he can't move properly.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  11. #11
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    You're right, JB, I am typing in a drug-induced haze - 'tis allergy season - so I may have missed a point or two, and been unclear.
    Founder of the Dyslexic Clique. Dyslexics of the world - UNTIE!!

    Member: Incredible Invisbles



  12. #12
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    If a horse has overly strong adductor muscles, it will alter the way they move behind, even if their conformation is quite normal (straight).

    The same will happen if the pectoral muscles are very tight between the front legs.

    The only and most effective way to address this properly is to tone and strengthen the lateral (outside) muscles in order to balance the medial and lateral muscles, or IOW the agonist and antagonist muscles). This can be achieved by doing more lateral work (taking the legs away from the body with specific exercises).

    In geldings, gelding scar restrictions can also cause issues like this. If you touch your horse's gelding scar and it feels cooler to the touch than the surrounding tissue, he probably has some scar restrictions in that area that should be addressed with fascial release work.

    I sure hope that when your horse was trimmed and shimmed behind the medio-lateral balance of the heels was maintained! If you pick up his hinds shortly after he's been trimmed and one heel appears to be higher than the other, the farrier is setting the horse up for potential joint issues in the future!

    You can also verify the eveness of the heels by measuring the depths of the collateral grooves at the heels. If you have different measurements the horse has no medio-lateral heel balance and the higher the difference the higher the risk of potential future joint problems from uneven loading!



  13. #13
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    BTR, perhaps you missed that the horse did not do this until the trainer/"farrier" trimmed the horse and "cut down" the outside walls.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by overwhelmed View Post
    Don't know and the trainer argued with me after he told me he had cut the outside down. Being a woman I hesitated to argue with him but I knew I was right! Thanks a bunch!
    WHAT???
    It's YOUR horse, Charley Brown, you are paying the bills ...the days when we couldn't speak our piece or have any say so about OUR property are long gone.
    Take off the hoops and pantaloons, put on some snazzy 2009 panties and woman up.
    You know why cowboys don't like Appaloosas?" - Answer: Because to train a horse, you have to be smarter than it is.



  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by JB View Post
    BTR, perhaps you missed that the horse did not do this until the trainer/"farrier" trimmed the horse and "cut down" the outside walls.
    Yes, so I did - in this case I highly suspect the farrier work causing the problem!! Find the another farrier and quickly!



  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by BornToRide View Post
    Yes, so I did - in this case I highly suspect the farrier work causing the problem!! Find the another farrier and quickly!
    Yes, and this means you might want to read all of the posts on these hoof threads to see what important facts about the situation you have missed
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by JB View Post
    Yes, and this means you might want to read all of the posts on these hoof threads to see what important facts about the situation you have missed
    I did - I misunderstood the last sentence.



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