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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr. 29, 2006
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    3,450

    Default Spin-off: What do people look for when they are looking to part-lease?

    I am definitely in the time challenged demographic. I have three, one of which I am seriously competing, and two that could benefit from more attention because I have NO time because of horse #1.

    I would love to find someone to ride the other two. What are people looking for when they are looking for a horse to part-lease?

    Also, where do you tend to look (internet, wom, bulletin board at tack stores)?

    Any help would be appreciated.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug. 30, 2007
    Location
    Illinois, USA
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    8,233

    Default

    My mum's Arab is share-boarded, and the people were looking for a quiet, easy ride they could just hop on a few times a week.

    In my experience, it seems most shareboarders want a no-strings-attached, easy to just hop on and go, kind of horse. They don't want a project, or something that they need to really work to have an enjoyable ride.
    Tell a Gelding. Ask a Stallion. Discuss it with a Mare... Pray if it's a Pony!



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul. 27, 2007
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    Behind the Orange Curtain
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    Quote Originally Posted by sublimequine View Post

    In my experience, it seems most shareboarders want a no-strings-attached, easy to just hop on and go, kind of horse. They don't want a project, or something that they need to really work to have an enjoyable ride.
    Or else they are looking for something with some training, that they can use to further their riding in a particular discipline.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec. 21, 2005
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    517

    Default

    Your location will be a big factor in whether or not people chose to part-lease your horse(s). Another factor is the quality of facility, can they ride easily? Is there an indoor in bad weather. Is the arena filled with lessons and/or many boarders during prime time. Also cost is important. If part-leasing your horse is so expensive that its comparable to someone boarding their own horse at a smaller facility you will put people off. The internet is a great place to advertise but personally I find the best situations develop when you can find someone with the same riding approach as you. The best way to do that is to find somone who is also taking lessons with your coach. If that first step doesn't find you someone widen your net to someone who attends the same clinics or same shows. Put up a sign in a local tack store. If all that fails then I would turn to the internet then.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov. 7, 2008
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Posts
    2,216

    Default

    As a re-rider, a part-lease is one option I'm considering a little down the road.

    I'm primarily interested in dressage, but I would like to jump (just to learn how) and also to do some trail riding (to get out of the arena once in a while.) With that in mind, I'd be looking for:

    A horse with previous dressage training to maybe 2nd level or so - maybe 1st, but I wouldn't want to be having to teach the horse while learning myself right from the start. Likewise, previous jumping experience and willingness to go out on the trails. (I know some horses freak out if you leave the safety of the arena. ) Personality-wise, not a dead-head, but also not so sensitive that I'll completely mess the horse up when I make mistakes with a cue or whatever.

    Clearly defined access to said horse, with some flexibility so that as my college class schedule changes things could be shifted as necessary. (I.e. sometimes I have classes on Monday evenings, and sometimes not. So it wouldn't do me much good to be locked into Monday evenings without some option to switch for the length of the term.)

    The horse would have to be stabled somewhere that had an arena of some type and either an in-house trainer that I got along with, or the ability to bring a trainer in. I wouldn't want to be hauling a part-leased horse someplace every week for lessons. (Plus I don't have access to a trailer, so I'd have to pay for hauling... would be very pricey.) Ideally someplace that also had access to some trail area.

    Option to take horse to schooling shows/clinics with approval from owner. I don't plan to show actively, but it might be nice to do it a few times for the experience.

    Good communication with the owner regarding scheduling, care, etc. Also, a clearly indicated 'emergency' contact who I could turn to if I thought there was a problem and couldn't get in touch with the owner. (Possibly just the barn manager, but some people can be picky about these things, so I'd want to know who had permission to make decisions about the horse/calling the vet/etc.)

    Clearly worked out guidelines as to who pays for which expenses, including any issues that might come up over the time of the lease. (If the horse is accidentally injured while I'm riding him, for example, am I responsible for the full cost/part cost? What about the care/therapy he might need to recover? Would I be expected to come out on my 'riding' days to handwalk him?)

    ETA: This is all 'in an ideal world' type thinking; obviously actually finding a suitable horse generally involves compromising based on what's available. (Though I wouldn't compromise on the good communication aspect - the owner wouldn't have to be willing to chat for hours on end, but if I could never get in touch at all with any questions or concerns, that would bother me - what if I had a query about something involving the horse's health?)
    Last edited by kdow; May. 8, 2009 at 08:36 AM. Reason: added ETA.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov. 22, 2003
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    7,136

    Default

    When *I* did, I was just looking for affordable riding. Answered ads, but found one through word-of-mouth. Fixer-upper horse; I paid for training and physical therapy.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr. 29, 2006
    Posts
    3,450

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    Then what am I doing wrong?

    The pony would be incredible for virtually anyone looking to either further their riding or show competitively. She is a large 13.3 and I have won lots against some fancy, fancy horses. My kids have won lots at schooling shows. No vices, jumps 3' with style, jumps cross country, auto leads, good on trails, does water and gates, and just plain fun.

    The TB is more of an intermediate horse (although she is a wonderful w/t horse for my very novice 13 year old son) because she is greener but a lovely, lovely mover, huge scope over fences, and in your pocket on the ground. She has the potential to be a spectacular show horse with some work. My plan was to get her out on our circuit this year but I just don't have the time. The young lady who was part-boarding her has gone to Europe to work.

    They are at a beautiful facility with an indoor arena, outdoor dressage ring with great footing, lots of other riding areas, full cross country course, miles of groomed trails, adult oriented so no riding school to compete for time. Fabulous certified, actively competing h/j/eventing/dressage coach who gives lessons at a very reasonable cost. Coach teaches excellent fundamentals in a very positive manner. Options to show and go to clinics. The facility is under a 10 minute drive from town.

    I am completely flexible about riding times - as much and whenever the rider can get out. Basically when my kids ride, they groom, tack up and w/t for a half hour. Neither horse needs to be ridden every day, I just would prefer they have more of a job to do. They both have custom fit tack. The part-board is all inclusive and I cover all expenses (vet, farrier, etc.). The fee is $180 a month, which is way below what boarding a horse would cost in our area.

    The only things I ask of the riders is that they have a provincial membership which provides some liability coverage (costs $35 a year), boots with a heel and a helmet.

    What am I doing wrong?



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov. 7, 2008
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
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    2,216

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Come Shine View Post
    Then what am I doing wrong?

    The pony would be incredible for virtually anyone looking to either further their riding or show competitively. She is a large 13.3 and I have won lots against some fancy, fancy horses. My kids have won lots at schooling shows. No vices, jumps 3' with style, jumps cross country, auto leads, good on trails, does water and gates, and just plain fun.

    The TB is more of an intermediate horse (although she is a wonderful w/t horse for my very novice 13 year old son) because she is greener but a lovely, lovely mover, huge scope over fences, and in your pocket on the ground. She has the potential to be a spectacular show horse with some work. My plan was to get her out on our circuit this year but I just don't have the time. The young lady who was part-boarding her has gone to Europe to work.

    They are at a beautiful facility with an indoor arena, outdoor dressage ring with great footing, lots of other riding areas, full cross country course, miles of groomed trails, adult oriented so no riding school to compete for time. Fabulous certified, actively competing h/j/eventing/dressage coach who gives lessons at a very reasonable cost. Coach teaches excellent fundamentals in a very positive manner. Options to show and go to clinics. The facility is under a 10 minute drive from town.

    I am completely flexible about riding times - as much and whenever the rider can get out. Basically when my kids ride, they groom, tack up and w/t for a half hour. Neither horse needs to be ridden every day, I just would prefer they have more of a job to do. They both have custom fit tack. The part-board is all inclusive and I cover all expenses (vet, farrier, etc.). The fee is $180 a month, which is way below what boarding a horse would cost in our area.

    The only things I ask of the riders is that they have a provincial membership which provides some liability coverage (costs $35 a year), boots with a heel and a helmet.

    What am I doing wrong?
    You don't live near me?

    Where/how are you advertising?



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov. 18, 2004
    Location
    Catonsville, MD
    Posts
    6,902

    Default

    You're in Canada, I'm figuring ('provincial membership')?

    Ditto the advertising question. In MD we have a horse newspaper called the Equiery which is the perfect place to advertise such opportunities.

    Do you have such a paper? Is there a local pony club / pony club website? Do you have any contacts w/ a trainer who might direct appropriate part-lessors your way? A trainer can be a great contact, because then you can establish some reference regarding the skill / reliability of the candidates.
    I tolerate all kinds of animal idiosyncrasies.
    I've found that I don't tolerate people idiosyncrasies as well. - Casey09




  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb. 14, 2009
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    622

    Default

    Yes - affordable riding was also my primary concern, but other factors trumped that.

    I had a lease earlier this year - for a mere $125 a month I had unlimited use of a 5 yr. old, 15.2h paint gelding. He was green-broke - pretty much a clean slate that I could write what I wanted on. I had a green-light to haul him out to events, and I had a trainer willing to come out and work with us. The horse was ideal. The only restriction was that he had to stay at his current barn.

    I gave up the lease after only two months. There was no bathroom and squatting in a stall was not going to work for me. The riding arena was used as turn-out for an aggressive gelding. There was a dressage ring - but the footing was unlevel and bumpy with low boggy areas, and I had to pick up trash in the ring before each ride.

    After that experience, I learned that it is just as important to evaluate the barn and check out areas where I'll be riding. Access to trails are a major plus. As is a bathroom.

    As for the horse - breed and color are not primary factors, but I would be slightly biased in favor of a dark bay/brown or liver chestnut with no or minamal chrome, or (go figure) appaloosa coloring. I prefer smaller horses, between 14.2 -15.2, but would go up to 16hh. I prefer a green or uneducated horse, but don't want to deal with vices. Good temperament very important.

    I like some flexibility in the days that would be available to ride. Rather than designated days, designated hours sometimes work out. I once had a share arrangement where I had the horse during the morning hours. I took the horse out on the trail for an hour or two about 3 or 4 times a week, and the other rider had dressage lessons or rode in the evenings 3 or 4 times a week. We agreed that the horse had Mondays off. So, if I were to share-lease a horse, the other rider and I would have to be fairly compatible in our use.

    I'm not really interested in showing, but it would be nice to include in the lease the possibility of hauling locally to shows or clinics, and especially to trail rides.

    I prefer to use my own tack as much as possible. If my current saddle doesn't fit, I'll use yours, but I'd probably be on the hunt for one that does if it looks like it would be a long-term lease. Same with bits - I'd prefer to use my own bridles and will buy whatever bit your horse is most comfortable with. I just prefer it this way because it avoids any issues with wear and tear, lost or broken gear. On the same note, I would expect to buy any fly sprays, hoof dressings, shampoos, conditioners, etc that I would use in the care and grooming of the horse.

    Definately would like written contract outlining what is expected from both lessor and lessee.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan. 11, 2007
    Location
    Central VA
    Posts
    1,406

    Default

    ComeShine-- that sounds like an awesome deal.

    What I'm looking for is something quiet, at a nice facility nearby with a nice arena (good fencing and footing and maintenance), to ride 3x/week and lesson once a week. I will not look anywhere that doesn't have a resident trainer, because I need the extra confidence of riding with someone consistently right now. I'm willing to pay more for amenities like an indoor, since this means I could ride consistently even in bad weather. I'm not interested in riding anywhere that is overrun with kids, prefer an adult oriented facility because I like my quiet time at the barn.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2006
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    11,372

    Default

    This is about the time of year people start crawling out of their caves and considering leasing a horse for the summer as the weather improves.....I'd keep advertising. I'd also consider placing different types of ads.

    Most of the people who have leased my horses were just looking for something to hack around on and spend time with. *Maybe* some of your adverts are a little overwhelming for the rerider or novice-y person who just really wants some horsey time figures your critters are "too nice". Ya know?

    Good luck! As soon as I find a more "permanent" place, I'll be advertising again too. It really does help me keep my fatty mc fat fat in work and frees up a little time for me to focus on my younger horse + defrays some of the cost.
    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

    Might be a reason, never an excuse...



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul. 27, 2007
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    Behind the Orange Curtain
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    The pony- I'm thinking you might have better luck if you maybe charged a small fee and then offered a trainer commission so trainers would send their clients your way?

    Maybe way off there, it was just a brainstorm idea

    The other one- I'm going to call economic downturn as the reason for that. A few horses that have been regularly leased at my barn are running into a dearth of part leasers lately as well- a lot of people are out of the market for a part-lease because they just don't have the money.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr. 29, 2006
    Posts
    3,450

    Default

    Thanks for the feedback. It sounds like there would be people interested in what I am offering. I have really only advertised on our local horse board most recently, so other ads may really be needed. I did have luck on equine.com in the past, so I will put something up there again,as well as taking up the other advertising suggestions.

    The part-boarder I had on my jumper recently ended the lease because she bought a house, so economics was a factor there.

    There is a bathroom in the BO's house which is readily accessible at all times. It is awesome to have a real toilet and sink. There are lots of barns here that don't have those facilities. Definitely a consideration.

    BuddyRoo: I have wondered about it being overwhelming as well. Do you have any suggestions?

    BeaSting: The facility is really nice. The footing is well maintained, regularly groomed, and there is no trash anywhere. If your horse poops in the arena, there is a fork and bucket to use. I certainly wouldn't expect a part-boarder to supply tack, equipment or anything that is used on the horse, because I really see that as my responsibility. However, if someone wanted to, that would be fine. I figure if I am trusting someone to take care of my horse, then they should also be trustworthy with the tack.

    Ambrey: What do you mean by charging a small fee? I would be interested in hearing more about your line of thought.

    Thanks!



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jul. 27, 2007
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    Behind the Orange Curtain
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    I meant something like a trainer commission- since trainers usually want to make money on the horses they find for their clients, if you're charging just part of board, you could increase that and kick some of it back to a trainer who brought you a leaser.

    I'm not sure if that would work, though, for a part lease. It was just a thought, for what you describe as a pretty decent show pony. A lot of people who might want a pony like that might already be working with a trainer and having the trainer shopping for them, and I've read here that trainers tend to ignore the ponies that don't involve any income for them.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2006
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    11,372

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    Well...not knowing your TB personally, it's hard to say what would be appropriate. For my been there done that do anything mare, I usually have an ad that says something to the effect of:

    "horse name" is an 18YO 14 3 QH/Morab cross with miles of trail experience, low level dressage and low level jumping. (2' 9" max) She is a perfect re-rider or novice horse. Bomb proof and loves to go do something already. Forward. Safe safe safe. No buck. No vices. Have penned and roped off of her as well. On site half lease, 3 rides per week. Nice indoor and outdoor and trails. Tack provided. Adults only please. Outside trainers welcome.
    But I'm looking for someone who wants to do trails, low level jumping, etc. I'm looking for the laid back re rider who wants to just get out and spend some time w/ horses.

    I don't know what would be more appropriate for your TB...but if she's quiet and can do more than arena work, I'd mention it. IF you want someone like that. IF you're looking for someone who is going to help bring the horse along jumping wise then it would be better to focus on intermediate to advanced riders...but with this market right now, a lot of the more advanced folks have horses being thrown at them left right and center. The market for leasing (to adults) in my area seems to be mostly middle aged women who got out of horses for awhile to start a family, don't really have the time or $$ to buy a horse of their own, and just want to get back into horses with minimal commitment. OR the college kid who can't afford to bring their horse to school and want to ride. That's MY market...and I have a horse that works for that. I would have a much more difficult time trying to lease my greener mare. Needs too much from the rider.
    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

    Might be a reason, never an excuse...



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jul. 7, 2005
    Location
    SFO Penninsula (As of April 2013!)
    Posts
    572

    Default network!

    Wow, sounds like you have 2 great deals!

    Here is my two cents - word-of-mouth networking and advertising. Do you expect/want them to be taking lessons with the "h/j/eventing/dressage coach" at your barn? That might be what is holding you back, it would be hard to network this opportunity to other trainers because it is likely they are not going to want to lose their clients to this barn/coach.

    It might be beneficial to ask this coach to get involved. Maybe they know of a kid or adult re-rider who would be an appropriate match. Since that coach will have the added benefit of more income from lessons, they would hopefully be willing to get the word out.

    Again, I would say word of mouth. You're going to need to catch someone who is not tied to staying at a particular barn/trainer and is willing to take lessons and ride at your facility. (Someone like me!) I would suggest as you are actively competing your #1 horse, just start chatting up people are horse shows, you'll never know who you end up meeting. Be sure to talk to all the staff too - the whipper-ins, show secretary's, braiders, they often know of ammy’s and kids who do things "on their own" and are more flexible about trying new trainers and facilities.

    Best of luck!
    Last edited by CFiona; May. 8, 2009 at 11:46 AM. Reason: funny HTML



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Feb. 23, 2007
    Location
    Cleveland, OH
    Posts
    466

    Default

    I second the word of mouth advertising, and also if there is a resident trainer at your barn (sounds like there is) and there are lesson riders there, this would be a great step up from a schoolie. See if your trainer has anyone interested in doing the half-lease.

    I went from weekly lessons up to a half-lease, and the trainer found the horse for me. It has worked out perfectly, and we are a great match. Perhaps your trainer, or one at your farm, would be able to find a perfect match for one of your horses!

    As a half-leaser, a green-broke horse would be fine (the one I am half-leasing is now 3, but was 2 when I started the lease) as long as he was safe and sane.

    I am sure there are tons of people around who would love the opportunity to ride more often, and with a half-lease, the fees are minimal, compared to owning.

    Good luck!



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Apr. 29, 2006
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    3,450

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ambrey View Post
    A lot of people who might want a pony like that might already be working with a trainer and having the trainer shopping for them, and I've read here that trainers tend to ignore the ponies that don't involve any income for them.
    That is a good thought Ambrey. And, yes, I do think people are hesitant to switch coaches and I guess I can see why trainers aren't keen to send their kids to another barn. We have a lot of good coaches in our area, so I think people, especially with the juniours, tend to stick to who they know. I can understand that.

    I have networked with other coaches but I never thought of it as potentially turning into losing some of their income, so that probably explains why I haven't had people breaking down the doors through this. I thought people would snap up the show pony because she has pages of championships to her credit, however, this makes sense why they haven't.

    That's a good point, too, about the market right now. Perhaps my target audience needs to shift away from people who want a show horse and emphasize other points - like the trails, learning to jump, doing some dressage - more of a pleasure aspect.

    My coach doesn't run a huge lesson program, so doesn't have a large client base to send my way. Trust me, I have mentioned it a few times.

    I guess I do need to be more proactive in getting the word out about these two. I'll try and make up a flyer to take with me to some shows to hand out. Plus the other suggestions people had.

    I think the situation would be perfect for a mother re-rider and her daughter who want to learn and enjoy horses without the expense and time committment of owning two.

    Trail riding at sunset with the kids, seeing the deer, crossing the creek is just an absolutely wonderful family time.

    Thanks for all the help. Wish me luck.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jul. 7, 2005
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    SFO Penninsula (As of April 2013!)
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    572

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    out of curiosity - where ARE you located?



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