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  1. #1
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    Default Help my poor car-sick dog

    My good farm doggie Jolene has always gotten car-sick. I feel like I'm missing out on some good dog/owner time by not being able to take her with me on errands, horse hauling, fun outings, etc.

    Has anyone conquered car-sickness and if so, what did you do? Desensitization? Drugs? Holistic remedies? HELP!
    Arrange whatever pieces come your way. - Virginia Woolf

    Did you know that if you say the word "GULLIBLE" really softly, it sounds like "ORANGES"?



  2. #2
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    I had one that the first year of her life got car sick every single time she got in the car. You could set your watch by it.
    The vet gave me some doggie dramamine (I don't remember exactly what the med was, I"m sorry) that we gave her, and we started taking her to fun stuff, like the beach and the barn, the feed store, stuff like that.
    As she matured she got better and now she's fine. it was very strange how she outgrew it all of a sudden.
    "Perhaps the final test of anybody's love of dogs is their willingness to permit them to make a camping ground of the bed" -Henry T. Merwin



  3. #3
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    Ginger works well for motion sickness. See if you can find an extract at the health food store.



  4. #4
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    How old is the dog? Just asking because I've never had a puppy that didn't get carsick. They've all outgrown it around their first birthday... although my turbomutt will still make herself sick if I don't buckle her in. If your dog moves around a lot in the car, a doggie seatbelt might help.

    I wish I could find a carsickness remedy for me - the adult human, who can get motion sick in a rocking chair. Unfortunately, dremamine knocks me out, and a mere whiff of ginger it nauseating to me even when I'm not feeling bad.
    Jer 29: 11-13



  5. #5
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    Default Dramamine

    I gave my Rottie Dramamine - regular, human, Dramamine. It worked great and he outgrew it by his first birthday (as many people have said). Ask your vet for dosage.

    Nothing worse than a car sick dog. ICK!!!!

    Good Luck!
    ******
    Shadow Dancer 2/17/91-12/23/10 - My Horse, My Heart <3



  6. #6
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    Feb. 21, 2004
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    My rottie used to get people dramamine. They have dog dramamine now--my vet raves about it.

    Fortunately, my girl grew out of her carsickness around 1.5 years, and it hasn't been a problem since.

    Before that, sometimes even with the dramamine, we had to keep the windows open otherwise---BLLLLAAAAAHHHH all over the car.



  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aggie4Bar View Post
    How old is the dog?
    She is four. While most of her (ill-fated and messy) car/truck trips were before she was a year old, she does go to the vet yearly and maybe one other trip. While she looks and acts normal longer, we still haven't made it the whole way without her getting that "sorry mom I'm turning green" look and tossing her cookies. Oh and I use "tossing cookies" metaphorically; I make sure she hasn't eaten shortly before embarking. That lessens the mess but she still gags and drools.

    Quote Originally Posted by Aggie4Bar View Post
    I wish I could find a carsickness remedy for me - the adult human, who can get motion sick in a rocking chair.
    I assume you have tried the wrist bands? A friend of mine had tried all sorts of things without success but was helped tremendously by the bands. And I have used them on a ferry, the only thing that gets me sick.
    Arrange whatever pieces come your way. - Virginia Woolf

    Did you know that if you say the word "GULLIBLE" really softly, it sounds like "ORANGES"?



  8. #8
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    Try stem ginger. Now dogs don't normally like it as it comes but you can buy real stem ginger jelly sweets and ginger nut biscuits made with stem ginger.



  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Liscar View Post
    Nothing worse than a car sick dog. ICK!!!!
    I disagree. At least a carsick dog is inclined (sometimes) to clean up its own mess. I had one pup that could leave you wondering if she'd really puked since a two more miles down the road, the vomit puddle would be reingested and the seat licked shiny clean. Sometimes she'd do it more than once in the same trip. Kids don't do that.
    Jer 29: 11-13



  10. #10
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    Dec. 26, 2002
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    When I started taking my German Shepard to obedience classes, they suggested a few ginger snap cookies for the car ride. Worked like a charm and she eventually outgrew the issue.
    1. Bozone (n.): The substance surrounding stupid people that stops bright ideas from penetrating. The bozone layer, unfortunately, shows little sign of breaking down in the near future.



  11. #11
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    Try giving her homeopathic "Ipecac" 30c right before you get into the car. Take just a short ride, like to the grocery store, and see how she does. Ipecac is a great remedy for nausea and vomiting and I've used it with car sick dogs with moderate success.



  12. #12
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    The first year or so of Ozzies life was terrible for being carsick. I used to have him in the seat next to me and when he started salivating, I grabbed his paw and massaged the acupoint for nausea (Think the spot on your wrist slightly below the base of your thumb, same place on the dog..) It seemed to help quite a bit and eventually he outgrew it.....

    otherwise, there are anti-nausea medications you can get from your vet
    Turn off the computer and go ride!



  13. #13
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    I was watching one of those dog shows...either Victoria or Ceasar...your dog may not be carsick. It may be stress/fear - related. I can't recall completely, but they started out putting the dog in the car for five minutes (not going anywhere) with all the doors open, then starting the engine for five minutes, backing out of the driveway, etc., you get the drift. Small, baby steps. It worked with no drugs.



  14. #14
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    The late princess would throw up every car ride, like clock work, then we had to move, across the country, with no chance to stop every 2 miles to let the dog puke. Vet game us a tranquilizer to give to her, I *think* it was Azebromathine, but I could be wrong.

    The day we intended to leave we gave her the pill, nothing doing all the farewell commotion....Pup was a live wire. So we gave her another pill....after a while we decided it was too late and to get a fresh start in the morning...by now everything had calmed down and low and behold, the tranqs started to work... poor pup was staggering about the house like a drunken sailor! And that was on 2 of the 3 pills the vet told us we could give her!

    Anyhow, by the second day we skipped the morning pill and saved it for the evening...when she was bouncing off the wall from sleeping all day in the truck...
    Quote Originally Posted by Bristol Bay View Post
    Try setting your broomstick to fly at a lower altitude.
    GNU Terry Prachett



  15. #15
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    We got an Rx from the vet -- sorry, I can't remember the name. But we had to experiment with the dose. The full dose caused him to drool like crazy; but he didn't throw up. Half dose -- still drooling, still not throwing up. One quarter dose -- no drooling, no throwing up. Go figure.

    But you have to give him the pill at least an hour before the trip, so you can't just decide to jump in the car at the last minute. On the plus side, the pill is good for 24 hours.

    I'm sure you could work through this as a behavioral issue just like Go Fish described. But, frankly, I have enough projects in my life, and I haven't done this.



  16. #16
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    the meds certainly help working through the issue...
    Quote Originally Posted by Bristol Bay View Post
    Try setting your broomstick to fly at a lower altitude.
    GNU Terry Prachett



  17. #17
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    I taught my dog to throw up into a barf bag

    She eventually outgrew the sickness but was never a fan of riding in the car. She loved riding loose inside the shell of the pickup truck (with a mat to stand on) and never got sick so I partially blame the way I drove the car. The truck didn't go very fast and certainly didn't corner as neatly and the dog appreciated the slower pace.

    Overall I've found that most dogs do better towards the back of the vehicle: ideally in the bed of a truck or back of a station wagon- the exact opposite of small children.



  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by silver2 View Post
    Overall I've found that most dogs do better towards the back of the vehicle: ideally in the bed of a truck or back of a station wagon- the exact opposite of small children.
    Ha ha! This makes me think of my two Corgis. They go everywhere with me, riding in the back seat of my SUV. They fight just like two human children and I'm tooling down the road, with my arm over the seat, whacking at them and screaming at them to shut up, just like a mother with the human kids in the back seat...



  19. #19
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    I fostered a puppy that would stare out the back hatch of the Tahoe. You could see his little head following the dashed lines in the road then.....HWARF! He'd commence his clean-up.

    As others have said, there is doggie dramamine as some human motion sickness medication is dangerous to dogs (I don't think it's dramamine though).



  20. #20
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    This may seem obvious, but don't feed for a few hours before a car ride. Also, I have had some luck with positive car experience like was mentioned previously. Let the dog hang out in the parked car with treats, petting, attaboys, etc. There is a fear/stress correlation to the puking. I had one dog that never got over it, most grow out of it with some simple positive training.
    "Right is right if nobody is right, and wrong is wrong if everybody is wrong."

    -Archbishop Fulton Sheen



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