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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May. 8, 2004
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    4,291

    Default ideas on treating chronic Thrush?

    Our mare has recently been diagnosed with Cushing's as well as a bad case of thrush. She has underrun heels anyway, and the cleft between the bulbs of her heel is deep, so treating the thrush has been difficult. The farrier told me it looks like she has had this problem off and on for a very long time because of the way she is built.

    She is on Pergolide for her Cushing's and we are treating the Thrush with White Lightning, but does anyone have any other suggestions for options for deep thrush? I am very worried about this. We have taken off her padded shoes and we are temporarily using thick pads taped on her feet per Vet's orders until we have a better handle on whether her discomfort and somewhat elevated digital pulse is caused by the thrush or laminitis. There was concern that she was having a Cushing's related laminitis, but she is on dry lot t/o and x rays look normal, thank goodness. We have also been icing her feet as a precaution, and she is on bute just in case this is what's going on.

    I wish they could tell us exactly where it hurts, and if our treatment is helping. Thanks for any suggestions from anyone who has successfully treated a thrush like this.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2006
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    11,372

    Default

    Well, until I got to the part about the vet recommending the padding...i would've said get that stuff off. Anything that's going to trap moisture in there is working against you.

    Other thing I would wonder is can the frog be cleaned up at all so as to eliminate some of the hidey places? IE: are there loose frog flappy pieces that can be removed?

    Next....I'd consider CleanTrax. I haven't personally used it because I've not had reason to. But I know several who have and it has worked beautifully for them.
    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

    Might be a reason, never an excuse...



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct. 19, 2005
    Posts
    7,320

    Default

    The farrier told me it looks like she has had this problem off and on for a very long time because of the way she is built.
    No, most likely your mare has had this problem for a long time because she's been metabolically affected for some time.

    Once you have the Cushings and her diet under control (as in low starch and sugar), she should improve. Also make sure she gets enough copper and zinc in her diet. Lack of that can also promote chronic thrush issues.

    Also read this: http://www.hoofrehab.com/diet.htm

    And check out the Yahoo Equine Cushings group: http://pets.groups.yahoo.com/group/EquineCushings/

    I forgot to add - deep seated sulcus frog infections are usually more common in upright and more contracted hooves because the hooves are not trimmed correctly (as in toes and heels left too long, creating incorrect toe loading). It is imperative that those hooves are trimmed properly (heels and toes shorter as needed) to create correct heel loading which will help to open the back of the hoof up and support healing.
    Last edited by BornToRide; May. 3, 2009 at 11:57 AM.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr. 16, 2003
    Posts
    438

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BornToRide View Post

    I forgot to add - deep seated sulcus frog infections are usually more common in upright and more contracted hooves because the hooves are not trimmed correctly (as in toes and heels left too long, creating incorrect toe loading). It is imperative that those hooves are trimmed properly (heels and toes shorter as needed) to create correct heel loading which will help to open the back of the hoof up and support healing.
    I am not an expert, but this is exactly what my new farrier told me about my horse's foot. In addition to changing the shoeing (he is my new farrier), he recommended that I treat the cleft with oxytetracycline every day for a month. I bought a bottle at Southern States and use a syringe to pull about about 2 cc's. I soak a cotton ball with that and push that cotton ball into the cleft.

    It has REALLY helped.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct. 19, 2005
    Posts
    7,320

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ToolTime View Post
    I am not an expert, but this is exactly what my new farrier told me about my horse's foot. In addition to changing the shoeing (he is my new farrier), he recommended that I treat the cleft with oxytetracycline every day for a month. I bought a bottle at Southern States and use a syringe to pull about about 2 cc's. I soak a cotton ball with that and push that cotton ball into the cleft.

    It has REALLY helped.
    Good farrier - sounds like a keeper



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb. 24, 2009
    Location
    SE Pennsylvania
    Posts
    204

    Default

    Try using a product called Today or Tomorrow. It's for cow mastitis - one's for milking cows one for dry, not sure which, but both work great. My friend was using a farrier that was only so so and when I finally convinced her to switch to my gal the horse had a hole in his frog that was almost an inch deep. I treated him almost every day for a couple of weeks and his frog now looks great.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar. 10, 2003
    Location
    Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    3,503

    Default

    I'm copying here a post that I just posted on another Thrush topic. Maybe some of it will be helpful to you:

    ----------COPY-------------
    Be very judicious if using Sugardyne and be SURE that your horse does not have any Candida in his hooves, as well as Thrush. Candida is YEAST and yeast THRIVES off dead bacteria and sugars! Yeast is fungus so you need both anti-bacterial AND anti-fungal.

    Yeast presents with a white, cheesy exudate in the back of the hoof and if there are any cracks between the heel bulbs (indicating contracted hooves, btw) then it takes up residence there, too. It has a distinct "cheesy" odor as well as exudate. Like Thrush, Candida is an anaerobic and a good flushing of Hydrogen Peroxide for both the Thrush and Yeast will help prior to any other treatment. The HP will administer OXYGEN and Thrush and Yeast don't like that!

    I also will add (edited to do so!) ... that if your horse has Yeast then he must be treated systemically .. get rid of the sugars in his diet as much as you can!! Sugar FEEDS YEAST. I would also pump up his immune system with herbs and vitamins. 4000 mg. Vit C daily along with 1 oz. Echinacea ... and Milk Thistle to strengthen his liver.

    The BEST preventative and cure is to ensure that the hooves are in optimal form and function. That means, barefoot or shod, the hooves MUST be correctly trimmed to the hoof-in-hand.

    ---------END OF COPY---------
    --Gwen <><
    "Treat others as you want to be treated and be the change you want to see in the world."
    http://www.thepenzancehorse.com



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar. 19, 2008
    Posts
    1,661

    Default

    The mastitis cream is great stuff.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2001
    Posts
    15,232

    Default

    I have yet to see thrush in a hoof that has healthy hoof form.

    I would learn everything I could about correct hoof shape and see if anything needs improving.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr. 5, 2003
    Location
    Houston, Texas
    Posts
    1,224

    Default

    Love the today/tomorrow cow mastitis treatment. It comes in a syringe type applicator that allows you to inject the cream up in to the clefts.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr. 11, 2007
    Location
    Middle Tennessee
    Posts
    956

    Default

    Due to an injury that kept me from taking care of my horses for a couple months during the muddy season two years ago (hubby is really great at feeding but not picking hooves or checking for health issues, I ended up with three horses that had a fungal infection deep in the sulci.

    After picking I:

    1. soaked each hoof in warm water/povidine/clorox. I used enough povidine to make the water dark brown and only a capful of clorox. Clorox is too invasive to use too much.

    I soaked for three songs or two commercials so grab a stool to sit on, if you choose to do this. After they were grained I put each horse in front of a tub full of hay so they'd stay quiet.

    2. After soaking pat as dry as possible with a paper towel.

    3. I used ToMorrow and pushed a little bit of diaper rash cream (10% zinc oxide) on top of the ToMorrow to help keep it in.

    4. In the mornings before turning everyone out, I would wipe off any excess sawdust and put some more ToMorrow in the crack and top it off with diaper rash cream.

    I did that every day for two weeks. That was two years ago and I haven't had any issues since, but I keep a close vigil on everyone's hooves.

    As a matter of record, one of those horses does have Equine Metabolic Syndrome and had it then. He is not on Pergolide but is on a diet that does not include oat & corn based grain.

    I gave that lengthy comment to say "yes, the ToMorrow works"



  12. #12
    Join Date
    May. 8, 2004
    Posts
    4,291

    Default

    Thank you, everyone, for great suggestions.



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