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  1. #1
    horserehab Guest

    Cool Do you believe in sending your horse to a rehabilitation center for ligament injuries

    Do you think it is better to rehab yourself, with handwalking, and ACE, or do you believe in the long term benefits of an equine rehabilitation center, with an underwater treadmill, and eurowalker?



  2. #2
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    Default

    A lot of that depends upon one's budget.



  3. #3
    horserehab Guest

    Default Rehab

    That is a misconception....at the end of the day - when the injury has completely healed - just compare the costs of ultrasounds, rechecks, reinjuries with the cost of a rehab center - I bet you will be surprised - if it means getting your horse back 6 months earlier - can you put a price on that?



  4. #4
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    Well, considering you seem to be from LLERC - a horse rehab place - I'm pretty sure your answer is quite obvious. Are you advertising your services?

    I mean, sure, if one had the budget for such things, it would be great. But a lot of people don't have such funds to send their horses to a fancy rehab place so they do what they can.

    I guess I don't understand what you're fishing for...
    My Mustang Adventures - Mac, my mustang | Annwylid D'Lite - my Cob filly

    "A horse's face always conveys clearly whether it is loved by its owner or simply used." - Anja Beran



  5. #5
    horserehab Guest

    Talking No, I want to know the public's opinion

    Yes, obviously, my passion is rehabilitating horses, just wanted to know the public's opinion on this - it is fascinating to me to understand how horse people think about rehab. - I am looking for information - that is all. I am always trying to educate people about equine rehabilitation.



  6. #6
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    I did mine at home. With a lot of help. As they say, it takes a village. He stayed in full training so I had that plus the cost of board. The days I was at the barn I did what needed to be done (hand walking, cold hosing, tack walking when we got that far) myself and then generally got a lesson or at least a ride on another horse. So the cost, aside from vet work that we would have had where ever he was, was the same.

    He didn't escape so we didn't have any delays due to self turnouts. We did have weather issues that lost us a total of two months, give or take.

    Not to say that it was all fun. Like the day I tried to walk him around the property and he kept spinning and trying to take off. I think that was the only day I threatened to take him to a rehab center. Not so say that I didn't think about it a few other times. That was also the day my trainer uttered the oh-so-true words "rehab isn't fun!"

    I felt that as long as we could manage it at home he would be happier among his "staff" and surroundings that he knows. Plus I was able to work with the vet I know and trust. Said vet also had the needed expertise and equipment. I also liked being a part of his rehab (at least most days) and being there for the vet appointments. But I am more hands on than some people.

    I was lucky in a lot of respects. Star is pretty easy to deal with. I have wonderful trainers who went along with the months of timed rides. And are now putting in extra time with getting him back to jumping and giving me the time with him alone in the ring that he sometimes needs. At our last vet check the vet commended us on a job well done.
    The Evil Chem Prof



  7. #7
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    Nov. 9, 2005
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    ligaments take a long time to heal and not just in 6 mths
    i have done a few myself and brought them back to full fitness but time and patience
    and not to rush things be it in a re hab center or not

    and none can say wether its a garanteed to work as it depends on the horse and the injury



  8. #8
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    Sep. 14, 2002
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    Oh please.

    A rehab center is not going to put anything back together faster than you can yourself.
    It's a great tool to use in conjunction with your healing protocol though!

    For instance:
    Shock Wave
    PRP or Stem Cell
    Lazer Therapy


    and then when they are ready, start taking them to the aqua tred NOT THE EUROSIZER!!
    For pete's sakes walk them in a straight line.

    And re injury can happen anywhere.

    I'm rehabbing my horse right now and I'm feeding/mucking stall/walking him myself. When he's ready to go back to work he'll go to the aquatred just to help me out a little bit with his fitness.
    Why do I need to send my horse somewhere so that someone else can feed him?

    Just because he's at a rehab facility does not mean you can pass go and forget to use any of the above soft tissue therapies.
    http://kaboomeventing.com/
    http://kaboomeventing.blogspot.com/
    Horses are amazing athletes and make no mistake -- they are the stars of the show!



  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by horserehab View Post
    Do you think it is better to rehab yourself, with handwalking, and ACE, or do you believe in the long term benefits of an equine rehabilitation center, with an underwater treadmill, and eurowalker?
    And why may I ask would an owner need to use ACE and the rehab facility not?
    Another stupid comment by the OP.
    http://kaboomeventing.com/
    http://kaboomeventing.blogspot.com/
    Horses are amazing athletes and make no mistake -- they are the stars of the show!



  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by horserehab View Post
    Yes, obviously, my passion is rehabilitating horses, just wanted to know the public's opinion on this - it is fascinating to me to understand how horse people think about rehab. - I am looking for information - that is all. I am always trying to educate people about equine rehabilitation.
    I'll give you a good honest answer.
    I can't stand looking at my horse right now. I would pay to have someone else do the walks if I could. I would love to send him away and have him come home ready to go.
    But that is childish and laziness on my part...as a sport horse owner.

    Also, my insurance does not pay for a rehab facility but it does pay for all the other goodies from my vet clinic. ; )
    http://kaboomeventing.com/
    http://kaboomeventing.blogspot.com/
    Horses are amazing athletes and make no mistake -- they are the stars of the show!



  11. #11
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    Default here I am again!

    sorry, I'm not trying to gang up on you. I have an aqua tred that I use often (when my horse was sound) so I do have some feed back.

    The website states here: (I bolded two phrases)

    Benefits:
    • Reduce recovery time b 50 - 60%
    • Strengthens musculature - especially back and neck.
    • Balances musculature between front end and back end
    • Great mental benefits for horses which otherwise cannot work.
    • Improved performance
    • Accelerated conditioning
    • Encourages muscle development
    • Increases cardiovascular fitness
    • Improves flexibility - increases stride
    • Promotes correct posture and balanced gait
    • Minimizes performance injuries

    Your facility cannot heal a suspensory ligament 50% faster. Sorry can't happen. Just because my horse steps foot onto a rehab facility does not magically add blood flow to the area.
    And my horse has taught himself to 'gait' when he trots on the tred. Therefore we can only walk him. So his posture and gait were not improved or promoted.
    http://kaboomeventing.com/
    http://kaboomeventing.blogspot.com/
    Horses are amazing athletes and make no mistake -- they are the stars of the show!



  12. #12
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    Nov. 10, 2003
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    I would rather have my horse at his regular home where there is a vet, barn staff, and caretakers that I trust and where I know my horse gets along with her neighbors and will not spend the day fighting with a new one.



  13. #13
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    It really depends on where my horse is and if the place would be a good place to rehab. Where my horse is now, I do not think I would do rehab there, no good place to hand walk without tight turns or hills. Too many kids there (it is a lesson barn) and while I think my horse would not go crazy with stall rest I would worry there. Do I have the money for a rehab place? No, but it would be cool if I did. If I had the money then I would because they know what to do! If it was your own leg would you do it on your own or have PT? Their place is going to be set up for horses on stall rest and people who can handle horses on stall rest.



  14. #14
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    It would depend on the cost and the experience of the facilities and their communication expectations with the owner, the distance of the facility and their experience dealing with the injuries in question. If you were talking $1500-$2000/month, I would consider it so long as it included daily swimming etc.

    When Rubs was hurt I looked for a TB rehab facility knowing it would be at least a year. Let's face it, a horse that has been in a stall for 6 months is a handful and those TB people are used and skilled enough at handling big money horses without them getting hurt again. Much more than your average amateur rider. Sorry. There is no way my horse respects me as much as one of the grooms especially when she is on the muscle and looking at everything. I am also a certified veterinary technician and my husband is a veterinarian. We have a small breeding farm and I am not your "normal" amateur. There are sometimes when you need to let go to a professional, in my personal opinion, this may be one.



  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by horserehab View Post
    That is a misconception....at the end of the day - when the injury has completely healed - just compare the costs of ultrasounds, rechecks, reinjuries with the cost of a rehab center - I bet you will be surprised - if it means getting your horse back 6 months earlier - can you put a price on that?
    Well truthfully you just lost my respect because I have probably been rehabing horses from all sorts of injuries longer than you have been alive and anyone that thinks they can heal a ligament up six months faster than the norm is either clueless or a liar or both.



  16. #16
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    Jun. 12, 2005
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    Default Timely

    This is near and dear to my heart, having just brought home one of my mares from eight months of rehab at a small, private facility about an hour and 45 minutes from me. My reasons for sending her, as opposed to doing it myself? She was boarded at a friend's small barn here (just her and me), and there was no one there during the day. There was also not a firm, flat surface for riding once we progressed to under saddle work. And... I travel frequently for work, so I would have had to find folks to come handwalk her, and get her under saddle work in on a regular, consistent basis--and that would have meant paying someone per ride or walk (adds up quickly).

    I couldn't have asked for better care than where she was, as the woman running it was a vet tech and a dressage trainer, and a truly compassionate lady; she also came highly recommended by the treating vet (they send her a lot of post-surgical cases). She wasn't high tech, though (no fancy exercise equipment), just consistent and regimented in her routine, and followed the vet's instructions to the letter. She rode on a firm, flat, abandoned turf airstrip once she was under saddle, and it was perfect (drained very well). If it rained, she hand-walked her with a rain sheet for the same amount of time she would have ridden her, up and down her driveway. Seven days a week, no matter what--unless there was lightning. While she had some help with stalls, feeding, etc., she was the one who was the primary caretaker, and she kept her operation small by design. She was also within a 15-minute trailer ride to the treating vet clinic that did the shockwave and stem cell treatment, along with followup ultrasounds. I can honestly say, from day one, I slept very well, knowing my girl was in such good hands. Given the distance, I was able to visit, and ride, only once a week (became my Sunday routine). Now I have a horse that's healed, very fit and sane--for about the price of training board around here. That, to me, was worth every penny.
    "We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give." - Churchill



  17. #17
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    A rehab center canNOT heal an injury an faster/better than a well-educated, dedicated owner...PERIOD. I have access to all the modalities they do and my vets trust me 100% to use them. The last time I left mine at a "rehab center" because I went on vacation, I came back to find out they didn't even bother to take her out of the stall for 4 days. Wanna know how I found out?? Said horsie was severely stocked up behind and had never been stocked up before (or since). Apparently, they had a family emergency and thought that was a good enough excuse to not do their job. I was ticked, to say the least. Also, although the Aquatred has plenty of fans on this board, I have to say that I'm not thrilled with the idea of the horse's feet being submerged in water that often or for long periods of time. Also, depending on the horse's movement, it can accentuate any deviations. For example, we had one that would continually hit himself in front while using the machine...so it's not an answer for every horse.



  18. #18
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    Dear rehabber:

    I think we can do it ourselves, w/ proper professional support. And the cost that you don't seem to understand is the following:

    My horse is at a great, wonderful facility. I love it. She loves it. There is a waiting list. It's LONG. If I sent Katy to a rehab facility to recover from her suspensory injury (we are at 2 months, probably have another month of stall rest to go...), I would have to pay my board while she was gone in order to keep her stall. There is no freakin' way I can pay what would amount to double board for the length of a suspensory rehab. Instead, we have done ESWT, hand grazing, Ace, walking in the indoor, and I have hired a junior rider to give me a hand a couple days a week, since 7 days a week is hard for actual employed people with families.
    I tolerate all kinds of animal idiosyncrasies.
    I've found that I don't tolerate people idiosyncrasies as well. - Casey09




  19. #19
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    I would consider it simply because of the time commitment. If I'm paying someone to do what it takes me hours a day (which I don't have) to do, it might be money well spent. Depends on one's budget, as others have said.

    I wouldn't expect miracles--tissue heals at its own pace and there are no miracles--but if a horse needs 2 hours of handwalking, daily shockwave, etc. and I don't have time to do it, well, I wouldn't expect the horse I kept at home to do as well.
    Click here before you buy.



  20. #20
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    I think it really depends on the details of the situation. But my preference in most cases is to rehab the horse myself.

    I know the horse is happy, stable and well taken care of at his current home, I trust the staff and I have access to my preferred vet/PT team. I can monitor his daily progress, feed him carrots and groom him. And, time permitting, I like the ability to do my part of the rehab work myself.

    But never say never. If I was at a less wonderful facility with less supportive staff, or I had an unmanageable animal, or I was super-busy and the price was competitive, or my vets were strongly recommending a therapy that I could not provide myself, then I'd think about a rehab place.

    If you're asking advice about how to make a rehab facility more attractive to owners, I think you really need to sell them on the idea that you have highly trained staff and provide excellent care beyond the PT modalities. Owners want to know that their horses are receiving the same level of care they would get at home. I think you also need to be willing to collaborate with owners' vets. And your price needs to be reasonable.

    Edited to add: I would not choose a rehab facility because it claimed that an underwater treadmill was better than handwalking, or promised me six months off of my recovery time for a suspensory. I know that's bunk. My decision would be based convenience, cost and quality of care.


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