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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May. 23, 2006
    Location
    Polk City, Florida
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    153

    Default "Closed herd" vaccination schedule ?

    If you have a "closed herd," meaning in this case:

    -No horses were on the property for at least one year before these horses arrived
    -No horses have entered or left the property in the past year
    -Neighbor's horses are at a minimum distance of six feet and cannot touch
    -Neighbor's horses meet above criteria

    How often might you vaccinate? Would you consider dropping from semiannual to annual?
    -Natalie
    Union Square Stables LLC
    Thoroughbreds



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep. 11, 2003
    Location
    Nuevo Mexico
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    4,253

    Default

    At the very least I'd vaccinate for West Nile and Tetanus yearly. Probably wouldn't bother with anything else.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct. 2, 1999
    Location
    Mendocino County, CA: Turkey Vulture HQ
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    14,833

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    I think it has as much to do with your area as whether your horses travel. Here in remote Northern California, my vet is recommending annual vaccinations - but we have hard freezes in the fall and not a lot of nasty insect related diseases.

    In Florida, you're facing a quite different environment.
    If you are allergic to a thing, it is best not to put that thing in your mouth, particularly if the thing is cats. - Lemony Snicket



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    36,072

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    EEE, WEE, WNV, tetanus, rabies.

    That's also assuming that you don't go to other barns and other barn people don't come to you.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  5. #5
    Join Date
    May. 30, 2006
    Location
    Little Rhody
    Posts
    3,740

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JB View Post
    That's also assuming that you don't go to other barns and other barn people don't come to you.
    That's also assuming no barn cats or other critters come on to your property to checkout the water supply. And you don't visit tack shops or have feed dealers and farriers out, etc...

    BTW, 6 feet isn't that far away. Droplets from good sneeze will travel a lot farther than that.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct. 18, 2000
    Location
    Connecticut
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    8,072

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    Quote Originally Posted by JB View Post
    EEE, WEE, WNV, tetanus, rabies.

    That's also assuming that you don't go to other barns and other barn people don't come to you.
    Ditto for trainers and instructors coming onto the property from other barns.
    If you truly do have a closed herd (no showing, no one out for training, no trail riding with off-premesis horses, no boarders in or out, and no people in/out of barns, feed stores, tack stores, etc), then vaccinate as above. Check with your vet to see if you will need to vaccinate twice yearly due to your location, and ask about Potomac as well if you are near a fresh water source or wetlands.

    When we went to a closed herd barn, our vet didn't believe they were really closed herd, so he insisted we vaccinate for everything (E/W/T, Flu/Rhino, Potomac, Rabies, Tetanus and Strangles. There was no WNV at the time). BO brought in two horses from down south, thought they looked ok so waived the quarantine rule, and ended up with a barn full of horses sick with strangles, including one with bastard strangles two weeks before we were set to move in. I have also known of one barn that was infected by a trainer coming in from a previous barn with Strangles-infected snot on her sleeve and working with a young horse. I have never considered letting the vaccs slip after that. It's easier to stay safe than ramp it all up again later on with vaccs and boosters.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2008
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    1,833

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    Quote Originally Posted by rcloisonne View Post
    And you don't visit tack shops or have feed dealers and farriers out, etc...

    .
    other than strangles, or maybe hoof and mouth, what are you referring to?



  8. #8
    Join Date
    May. 30, 2006
    Location
    Little Rhody
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    Quote Originally Posted by Androcles View Post
    other than strangles, or maybe hoof and mouth, what are you referring to?
    I believe the outbreak of equine influenza that shutdown racing in Australia a couple of years ago was possibly spread by a farrier who had had contact with an infected horse from Japan.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug. 26, 2001
    Location
    Oxford PA
    Posts
    10,337

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    Quote Originally Posted by Androcles View Post
    other than strangles, or maybe hoof and mouth, what are you referring to?
    Possibly rhino (herpes).



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct. 3, 2002
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    it's not the edge of the earth, but you can see it from here
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    Obviously FL is going to differ from ME, where I am.

    I have worked with my vet on 'minimal' vaccinations after a couple of issues with dogs and horses... Obviously your *local* vet is the one to work with.

    For horses that got proper foal innoculations, I do every other to every third year of EEE/WEE/Tetanus. Studies have shown that adults who were properly immunized as youngsters have much longer immunities than previously thought. OTOH, I DO them every 2 years because we have recently had horses die from EEE not to far from here. Tetanus is a no-brainer too--but again, does last longer than previously thought...

    I don't do WNV because my risk is so very, very low. The stage of skeeter that transmits gets here right around the time of the first frost. I am in a very breezy location with low mosquito problems. We discussed risk vs. risk from vaccine (I had two have adverse reactions) and that's my choice.

    This was not always my plan, nor will it stay my plan should things change. Potomac is something for me to think about. WNV will come up again if it comes up in the area.

    Rabies did cross the Penobscot a few years ago, and I evaluate that year-to-year. Dogs and cats get rabies at recommended intervals.

    I don't do strangles or flu. Many of my horses have been exposed to or had strangles. For the rest, the odds of it being the same strain are slim to none.

    Rhino is something I'm CONSTANTLY re-evaluating. Had a partner farm with abortion storms following pg rhino shots about 8 years ago. I stopped giving them at that time. As I have ZERO exposure for pg mares. Should the exposure change, I will give them again. As far as the other type of Rhino, I probably will have to do it if the stallion starts showing again this year.

    It is not a matter of cost. It's probably just as cheap for me to do everything in a 5-1 or such as I do them myself. I *know* vaccines save lives, but I think we also over-vaccinate without asking why. I truly, fervently wish there were better statistics on incidences of founder following multi-vaccintations, particularly 4 & 5 ways *plus* rabies in the same day. You hear the anecdotes--and I've heard too many FIRST HAND to not have noticed--but I haven't seen any studies yet. I think it's too many to be mere coincidence, in the small circle of horses I personally know... <shrugs>

    In the end, I think you research, and do the *best you think you can.* Sometimes that's less, sometimes it's more. I'm TRULY blessed to have a vet who is very open, and VERY into ongoing education, who doesn't think I'm a *total* whackjob. HE administered the WNV that caused the issues... so I have more clout there.

    Just a long rambly answer that proabably is irrelevant to your geography, but at least it gives an idea how I arrived at what/when I do.
    InnisFailte Pinto Sporthorses & Coloured Cobs
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Bits are like cats, what's one more? (Petstorejunkie)



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb. 11, 2007
    Location
    Spring Grove, PA
    Posts
    850

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    My 2 that are 'permanently home', get everything everyone else gets with the exception of strangles. They are at a different barn, and have no contact with the others that do leave the farm.

    It just isn't worth skipping vax, IMO, much cheaper to attempt to PREVENT the disease, rather than attempt to treat it. JMO.

    I also only vaccinate once per year. I give my bug shots (WN,PHF) as late as possible. I am actually probably going to give them this week, given the 90 degree day we had today!



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2008
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    1,833

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    Quote Originally Posted by pintopiaffe View Post
    For horses that got proper foal innoculations, I do every other to every third year of EEE/WEE/Tetanus. Studies have shown that adults who were properly immunized as youngsters have much longer immunities than previously thought. OTOH, I DO them every 2 years because we have recently had horses die from EEE not to far from here. Tetanus is a no-brainer too--but again, does last longer than previously thought...


    will have to do it if the stallion starts showing again this year.

    It is not a matter of cost. It's probably just as cheap for me to do everything in a 5-1 or such as I do them myself. I *know* vaccines save lives, but I think we also over-vaccinate without asking why. I truly, fervently wish there were better statistics on incidences of founder following multi-vaccintations, particularly 4 & 5 ways *plus* rabies in the same day. You hear the anecdotes--and I've heard too many FIRST HAND to not have noticed--but I haven't seen any studies yet. I think it's too many to be mere coincidence, in the small circle of horses I personally know... <shrugs>
    What has been previously the duration of immunity? what studies can you point to, I have thought this was a question no one was addressing. what did they find the doi to be?



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct. 3, 2002
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    I'm sorry, my cite was a couple of computers ago...I will try to dig it up again later tonight.

    But basically for EEE/WEE they were saying a horse properly innoculated in it's first two years of life basically showed lifetime immunity. Now, since we have had EEE up here, I won't go quite that far... but it's food for thought.

    Rabies has gone from yearly to five years in dogs *on the state law level!* I don't think anyone is/has studied it in horses, but it leads me to believe that every-other-year might be reasonable. (And my vet agrees...) *Though I currently don't give Rabies to the horses...
    InnisFailte Pinto Sporthorses & Coloured Cobs
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Bits are like cats, what's one more? (Petstorejunkie)



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by pintopiaffe View Post
    Rabies has gone from yearly to five years in dogs *on the state law level!* I don't think anyone is/has studied it in horses, but it leads me to believe that every-other-year might be reasonable. (And my vet agrees...) *Though I currently don't give Rabies to the horses...
    Yes, the recommended interval has increased. But to my knowledge, not based on any actual studies but mostly a response to owners questioning it.



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