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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct. 1, 2007
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    16

    Default New farm--Need advice from those with no climb fence

    Hi everyone,
    To those who have installed and are maintaining no climb horse fence with a top board--what do I need to know before installing and about maintaining? Will a handy brother-in-law with a semi-handy lackie (DH) and I (not all that handy pharmacist/horse owner who will do the research to make sure its done properly) be able to install it ourselves? (we have access to a post hole digger etc.). It looks to be slightly...complicated We'll be fencing an area that's between 2 and 3 acres (winter sacrifice paddock).
    I've watched the videos on the Redbrand website and learned a lot by searching this forum (e.g. going with a 5 ft fence )...but im looking for insider tips and advice--what not to do etc. I know that gates & corners need to be braced but that's about it.
    I've read that they need to be tightened...how does one go about doing that? Please excuse the dumb questions...such things are not intuative to me
    Any help greatly appreciated!!!



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul. 11, 2002
    Location
    NW
    Posts
    438

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by higgs View Post
    I've read that they need to be tightened...how does one go about doing that?
    You will want to get a tool like this one: http://www.tractorsupply.com/webapp/...&Special=false

    My husband did install our woven wire fencing himself. We hired someone to put the posts in and had them driven in. But my husband did the wire and top board himself. He used a small tractor and that tool to stretch the wire. Mostly, I just stayed out of the way

    We have had our fence up for probably 4 years and have done minimal maintenance on it - I think he may have re-tightened a section or two of the fence after the first year and that is it.

    We used the Red Brand wire in the 4' height. Added a top rail with a small gap between it and the wire and then put hot wire (Electrobraid) a few inches above the top rail. Our fence is approx 4' 6" tall.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec. 6, 2000
    Location
    SE Mass
    Posts
    4,177

    Default

    Love, love, love our 5' non-climb. We live in rocky MA. We dug three post holes ourselves, then hired a backhoe to come and do the rest. It was expensive but worth it. Don't hesitate to call Red Brand. They were very helpful. Once you get the hang of running the fence on the outside of the posts at the corners and on the inside of the posts on the lines, it goes pretty easy. You need a fence tightener, and you need somethings to attach to the fence and to attach the fence tightener to. My farrier had made a tool that he loaned us, but others have said that they made a bracket of wood. The problem is that the fence tightener has one hook, and you have to distribute the pull along the entire fence. You can build something with two pieces of wood and wing nuts that fasten through the mesh. Then when you attach the fence tighener, the pull is distributed along the wood.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun. 21, 2004
    Location
    Cairo, Georgia
    Posts
    2,431

    Default

    Absolutely don't use any other brand of fence other than Red Brand. The others might be the same gauge but I've found them all to be brittle instead of Red Brand. RB actually does what it says & stretches before breaking. The others just take a small hit & then they expose sharp wires. Also the bottoms of the others aren't wrapped as well & are literally just sharp wires at each wrap pointing down. Really will cut up a horse that gets it's leg under it. RB is well wrapped. This sounds dumb but be sure to put the smooth side against the horse & on the horse side of the posts. A friend just had a "professional" fencing job done & the entire 20 acres is done with the sharp part next to the horses & on the outside of the posts.
    I found that the bigger fence posts are of course the best, a true 5-6" round post with bigger at every gate. Also I wish I'd measured every gate I was installing so the fit would be tighter. Less chance of leg getting caught between gate & post. First fence we pounded in sand at every post. NEVER AGAIN!!! What a pain. Now, just dump in powdered concrete. Also fence post 8 feet with 3 feet in the ground.
    I like to wrap all the joined areas & areas at posts, etc instead of using the quick connect brackets as it's smother without the sharp edges.
    One guy who built one of my fences placed the pull posts then put the fence on the INSIDE. What a mess. Saggy!
    Have fun & buy some gatoraid!! That's hard work!
    Producing horses with gentle minds & brilliant movement!
    www.whitfieldfarm.shutterfly.com



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug. 26, 2001
    Location
    Oxford PA
    Posts
    10,337

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Whitfield Farm Hanoverians View Post
    Absolutely don't use any other brand of fence other than Red Brand. The others might be the same gauge but I've found them all to be brittle instead of Red Brand. RB actually does what it says & stretches before breaking. The others just take a small hit & then they expose sharp wires. Also the bottoms of the others aren't wrapped as well & are literally just sharp wires at each wrap pointing down. . . .
    Ok, I'm going to disagree. We have Baekert (not sure of the spelling) & I have compared it to Red Brand & I think the brand we have is much better. I'm pretty sure Poltroon (who posted about their 5' high fence with the black vinyl rail top) also has Baekert.

    We had our fence professionally installed (with the posts driven, NOT put in post holes). It has been over 4 years now & it is beautiful - no maintenance at all. Before we had our fence installed, our installer brought samples of Red Brand & Baekert & gave us a choice of either one at the same price - it was so obvious with the two side by side that the Baekert was much better, much heavier gauge wire for one thing.

    Anyway, I love no climb. By the way, we have about 3,600 linear feet of no climb on the perimeter of our property so we have quite a lot of it.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug. 26, 2001
    Location
    Oxford PA
    Posts
    10,337

    Default

    Yeah, I spelled it wrong. I believe this is the fencing we have:

    http://www.bekaert.com/en/Product%20...b%20Fence.aspx

    It's spelled BEKAERT!



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov. 26, 2003
    Location
    NE FL
    Posts
    6,479

    Default

    We have that Red brand too and I am very happy with it. You must pull it very tight.
    It's helpful to set a separate pulling post in concrete but you don't have to, but it is a very good idea to set at least your corner posts in concrete, and definitly brace them well.

    If you can borrow, rent or hire someone with a post driver it will make your life much easier.

    The fence stretcher thing someone else posted was a pain in the a#$. That lasted about a half a day when we did our fence and we got sick of it.

    We pulled ours with a tractor, I have seen people pull it with a truck.

    Roll out the whole roll along the posts. Make sure that it is set the right way (the smooth side of the knots to the inside, the red wire toward the top) and we put the fence on the inside of the posts to make it harder for the horses to push it. Some folks put it on the outside for aesthetics but IMHO safety and practicality are more important.
    Anyway, at the end of the fence roll, take two 2x4s and lay them parallel to the edge of the fence about 2 or 3" in from it. Nail them together (we used a nail gun, but you can use a hammer, they just need to be nailed well) then take your pull strap and tie one end to what you are pulling with, then wrap it around the 2x4s several times going through the fence, then wrap the other end of the pull strap to whatever you are pulling with (tractor, truck bumper whatever). The key is to tie evenly so you get even tension on the fence.
    Also plan what fence line you will put up when. We cross fenced and found it was easier to do one particular fence before another due to how we had to pull it, etc.

    Go to the beginning of the fence line, and secure that end. Many people use fencing staples, we nailed them in with a pneumatic nailer. We just put the generator in the truck bed with the compressor and went at it.
    One person gets in the pulling vehicle and then begins pulling forward SLOWLY while the other person starts the beginning of the fence and sets it up onto the posts, making sure the bottom is where it needs to be etc.
    Once the fence is pulled tight and is where you need it, go to the beginning and start tacking it down.

    It was much faster, and tighter than trying to go down the fence line pulling it with a hand stretcher. We did five acres.
    "Perhaps the final test of anybody's love of dogs is their willingness to permit them to make a camping ground of the bed" -Henry T. Merwin



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    40,865

    Default

    We have some diamond mesh that is a good 60 years old and still looks like new.

    For a wire stretching fence tool, we use two 2x4's, that we drilled two holes in and bolt together, the wire sandwiched in the middle and then stretch it with a chain on two points on the boards and a simple cable comealong.

    Still have the original, half century boards, so it works, no one broke them.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct. 1, 2007
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    16

    Default

    thanks for the advice so far everyone, definately useful
    I haven't been able to find info on post spacing...is 12 ft OK or does it need to be 8? We are going to have to go with 9 or 10 foot posts since we must go down 4 feet to get below the frost line here so would like to save money where we can (without sacrificing durability or safety).

    Do you find the fence needs to be re-tightened over time? If so how is that done, do you need to undo one end and re-stretch or is there an easier way?
    Thanks again!



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov. 26, 2003
    Location
    NE FL
    Posts
    6,479

    Default

    The closer your posts are the stronger your fence will be. Just make sure to put them at a distance where you can easily get the top rail. (12' or less) and remember to measure the posts so the measuring point is in the middle of the post so the boards will fit.

    Our fence has been up for 6 years so far, and we haven't had to tighten it or anything. I don't know how you could without really effin up the whole thing.
    A couple of the first sections we did have a couple of saggy places, but that was only due to our inexperience in putting it up. The rest of it that we put up after we figured out what was what are doing great and stayed nice and tight.
    Reiterating that you definitely need a post driver.
    "Perhaps the final test of anybody's love of dogs is their willingness to permit them to make a camping ground of the bed" -Henry T. Merwin



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov. 6, 2002
    Location
    Henrico, NC 36 30'50.49" N 77 50'17.47" W
    Posts
    5,810

    Default

    Baekert (spellling might not be right) is first choice for me. It's hot dipped galvanized as opposed to electrocoated.

    One of the most important things is not to kink it when you roll it out. Roll it out in place beside the posts with the top away from the fence. Get as many hands as possible to roll it up into place without letting it fold enough to kink. It's not hard but you have to make everyone pay attention to what they are doing.

    You need some kind of puller. I use a "rope puller" which looks like a "comealong" that normally has a cable but it will clamp onto 1/2" twisted rope which can go as far as necessary to tie to something secure to tighten the fence. Drill 3 or 4 holes through 2 2x4s and bolt that to the fence to do the pulling. If you have two really big helpers who can bench press over 400lbs., like I do-have such helpers not bench press 400, then you don't need the above.

    The night before, or sometime before you start to work on the fence itself, take a hammer and a hard block of wood or metal-like an anvil-and tap the legs of the staples straight. They come all sorts of ways in the box and usually the legs point away from each other and splay in all sorts of odd ways as you drive them. Anything shorter than 1 1/4" makes it easy to hit your fingers and you probably should use at least 1 1/2" anyway. Don't drive them into the post as hard as you can to include denting in the wire. It makes it very hard to get them back out if you ever, or whenever, you need to do a repair. Just tight enough to hold snuggly.

    Set your corner posts STRONGLY.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep. 27, 2006
    Location
    kentucky
    Posts
    459

    Default

    Bekeart!
    We put up Red Brand fence 13 years ago and have had to replace ALL of it because it rusted and stretched out. It looked awful after only 5 years.
    We replaced it with Bekeart, which still looks great after 5 years. You should NOT have to tighten your fence unless something runs into it. I will buy no other brand.
    The corners are the key. Make sure they are properly braced and use big posts.
    Consider having the posts driven. We have augered holes and it is a no brainer that it is worth EVERY PENNY to have the posts driven instead!



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr. 1, 2003
    Location
    Cocoa, Fla
    Posts
    4,124

    Default

    1. Post should be in ground around 3 feet? Deep
    2. Water at base of post while adding dirt back in and tamp down to eliminate air pockets and make post solid in ground (like concrete).
    3. Corners should be thicker posts - 3 post in an "L" shape with cross beams nailed in - use LARGE Nails - around 4 - 6 inches long and thick. Pre-drill hole in end of the post that's going sideways in the "L".
    l----l----l (Like this with center "l" the middle of the corner and the thickest post - we use telephone poles or marine - dock - poles).

    For gates (NOT in corners) just use l-----l GATE l-----l
    Why do you need these? Because when you adhere one side of the fencing to the first post you'll be pulling it with a tractor (til tractor stalls out) OR a pickup truck. Idea is to pull it taunt then tack it to fence post, wrapping fence wire around post.

    4. Distance between fence posts is no more than 12 feet - we usually do 10 feet. If you're putting a board on top it'll be shorter than that.

    And always pull a line before starting to put poles in - you want it straight.
    Sandy in Fla.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct. 6, 2004
    Location
    NASCAR HELL
    Posts
    1,752

    Default

    If at all possible you should definately use locust posts and don't forget to string hotwire over the top or the beavers will eat your boards and lean over you fence!
    The rider casts his heart over the fence,
    the horse jumps in pursuit of it.

    –Hans-Heinrich Isenbart


    1 members found this post helpful.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct. 4, 2008
    Posts
    745

    Default

    After installing 1000's 1000's of bf of both 4 board, and no climb with my extended family on our farm; I will encourage you to pay the man to drive the posts. ( I will never operate an auger again, the man is worth it, and he can do hundreds in a day.)



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Oct. 1, 2007
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    16

    Default

    if posts are driven do corners/braces still require cementing?

    I've emailed Bekaert about suppliers in Ontario. It seems the local Home Hardware (national chain in Canada) sells "Rangemaster" no climb fence--it has the EXACT same description, specs & picture as the Redbrand--anyone know if the two companies are affiliated?

    Thanks again!



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Aug. 26, 2001
    Location
    Oxford PA
    Posts
    10,337

    Default

    Well, the professional fence installer who did our no-climb DID drive the posts & did NOT put corner posts in concrete. I can tell you that 4-1/2 years later the fence is still perfect. I think driving the posts is the very best way, at least in this area.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Dec. 6, 2000
    Location
    SE Mass
    Posts
    4,177

    Default

    Our corner posts are not in concrete. The guy dug the holes with a backhoe. Our rocky New England soil, though, may be like concrete.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Dec. 1, 2007
    Location
    Gettysburg, PA
    Posts
    2,632

    Default

    We have 1 no climb field. Although I love it, asking my SO to do another would probably leave me single Its the only job on the farm he I saw him really grumpy from. The rest of our fields are flexi vinyl and/or coated wire - he doesn't mind doing those.
    Epona Farm
    Irish Draughts and Irish Sport horses

    Join us on Facebook


    1 members found this post helpful.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Oct. 4, 2008
    Posts
    745

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by higgs View Post
    if posts are driven do corners/braces still require cementing?
    I am not cemented or braced, and we have a mix of clay and loam soil. The corners are fine, I tried to not make a square corner wherever possible though. The angled corner is nice because horses can't squash each other in a corner this way.



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