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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov. 19, 2006
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    1,019

    Default Dog agression, inadvertantly encouraging?

    Red is dog aggressive, not im going to kill them on sight aggressive, but if she even remotely thinks they looked at her wrong she will go after them. But will stop once they go "OH Living crap run!"*panic panic panic*"are we safe yet?!"

    While thi has taught my horse idiot dog manners around horses (FINALLY after MANY years) I cant help but worry about the dog that just happens to walk a milimeter too close to her.

    Now my question is, am I inadvertantly encouraging this? When i work with the horses, like longing and such or trying to do something in general and the dogs get in the way, i go after them to get them out of my hair so to speak, either smacking the ground next to them with the longe whip or going after them myself stomping my foot to get my point across. I have noticed on occasion that Red will watch with extream intrest, not the Im paying attention during longing work or ground work, or riding, but alot more intrest and attention than normal teaching activities.

    So am i doing it on accident, if i is she likely to get worse, stay the same, or get more tolerant?

    Does this look like a horse out to get dogs to you?
    http://i61.photobucket.com/albums/h4...hoto1012-1.jpg
    Did you know, today is yesterdays tomorrow and what you would leave for tomorrow you should do today?
    I am pro-Slaughter



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr. 8, 2005
    Location
    WA state
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    1,045

    Default

    Personally I wouldn't worry about it, my youngest likes to chase dogs a little and I'd much rather have him do that than run from them. This is a horse farm, dogs have to learn to get out of the way!



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2000
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    24,408

    Default

    Actually the picture shows a dog that looks VERY aggressive. It's focusing on the horse in a very unsettling way. It's not biting and chasing at that moment, but I would NEVER let a dog focus on a horse that way. You are, in fact, encouraging aggression when you say, 'yes, you are allowed to stare at that dog as if it's a pair of lamb chops' (or horse, or whatever).

    ALL dogs can chase horses. You have to punish them very, very dramatically, consistently and forcefully, and slapping a whip on the ground is NOT what I am talking about. That's weak a**, and the dog knows it. Aside from that, training a dog with loud noises doesn't work. Eventually he gets used to the loud noise and he goes back to doing as he pleases.

    AND...he knows you can't always get at him because he is loose and running around, and he's seen this happen again and again and he knows when he's loose he can do whatever he wants.

    Stop letting your dog run around loose. Control him. Sure it's more convenient to let him run around loose, but frankly, it doesn't work. They know they are loose and you can't get to them. They are not stupid. Tie the dog up.

    And if you still have a problem, that's proof the punishment is not effective deterrent. If you deal with a problem correctly, you correct it ONCE, and that's it. Done. End of story.

    MOST dogs will be aggressive to other dogs. It is a question of whether you allow it or not. Your dog should be looking at YOU and listening to YOU, not staring at a dog or horse. YOU are the leader, you give PERMISSION for what he does, or like any pack leader, you show him that he cannot do it, and he doesn't do it.

    There is no middle ground. You are either encouraging behavior or you are stopping it. You are either the leader or you are not.

    In a pack, only one dog is allowed to initiate anything against any other dog or animal. IF a subordinate tries, the leader will rush over and take him by the neck. If he's smart, he'll lie down himself and stick his belly up in the air, 'sorry sir'. If he doesn't he will have the leader and the rest of the pack on him in a split second. In the pack, there is no tolerance for subordinates screwing around. What the leader says goes and the rest of the pack knows it.

    If you can't or won't train him to behave in a consistently safe manner, get help from a professional or put the dog to sleep. If you let him chew up other people's dogs, eventually you are going to have some pushback from someone or one of those dogs is going to rip the sh** out of your dog or kill him. If someone's dog doesn't kill yours, someone is going to shoot your dog, or leave out poison for it. You can't get away with stuff like that. You will piss someone off eventually.

    And having the other dog run off and your dog stop, isn't a solution.

    You can consider a shock collar, but if you get it, LEAVE IT ON, and use it with determination and consistency.

    A dog can learn to do ANYTHING if you are willing to be consistent and firm. When allowed to choose, he chases things that move. He's a predator. Be realistic.



  4. #4
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    Nov. 19, 2006
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    Default

    slc: actually that dog shot up and ran away, he is scared of horses (especially Red) and if she blinks wrong at him he books it, in the picture previously before this one he was dozing off until she took interest in him.

    He is currently being taught to tie, lead, and commands other than sit, he is a recent acquirement (showed up literally one day and just stayed) It is a very long process and is looking to be that way since he panics when he realizes he is tied. First time he was tied was not a fun day, its a wonder he didn't break his neck with his reaction to it.

    I would LOVE absolutely LOVE to get an e-collar for both dogs, my horse idiot dog would be the first one it would go on, because my family is apparently unable to keep him contained when Im not home, I get calls at work "Sirrus got out again, no we aren't going to get him"

    When we first got Red (Note this made my blood boil when i found out) I was at work, mom decided to take Sirrus for a walk *knowing* he wasn't good with horses, took him to see the "pretty ponies" and he bit Red on the nose, Red being the sweet mare she was double barreled him through the fence.

    Not only did mom endanger my dog, she endangered my new horse! The resulting conflict when i heard that, was memorable. he no longer has those issues (alot of work and punishment for so much as thinking about looking at the horses)

    But yea, I would love the e-collar for him, Ive brought it up and continue to bring it up.
    Did you know, today is yesterdays tomorrow and what you would leave for tomorrow you should do today?
    I am pro-Slaughter



  5. #5
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    Apr. 14, 2007
    Location
    Pen Argyl PA
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    Default

    please try to stop this behavior. these are the types of dogs that end up killing small dogs or mini horses.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr. 30, 2008
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    17

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kitari View Post
    I would LOVE absolutely LOVE to get an e-collar for both dogs, my horse idiot dog would be the first one it would go on, because my family is apparently unable to keep him contained when Im not home, I get calls at work "Sirrus got out again, no we aren't going to get him"
    I guess I'm confused: how do you propose an e collar will work when your family is too lazy to close gates or doors? They'll be in the house watching TV or whatever, and zap the dog if they see him running?

    I've trained retrievers with e collars, and they are an excellent tool. But in the hands of the inept or uncaring they are abusive. If your family can't be bothered to keep a dog locked up they should not have access to a controller for a collar. The timing needed for a correction so the dog can learn to control the collar (which is what proper e collar conditioning is about) is not something that can be learned by people who can't even learn to close a gate.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2001
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    Default

    I think Red is the horse? Chasing dogs....
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  8. #8
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    Apr. 14, 2003
    Location
    Shenandoah Valley, VA
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    Default

    I had to read the OP a few times to figure it out. It is the (red) horse, named Red, that is being aggressive towards dogs. Not a dog being aggressive. But it sounds like the family needs some work too! To answer the original question, no, I don't think the horse is smart enough to imitate your behavior towards the dogs. So I don't think you are encouraging it. JMHO.



  9. #9
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    Nov. 19, 2006
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    Default

    Yes Red is the horse. Im having horse to dog aggression not dog to horse aggression issues

    I didn't mean e-collar like the one you push the button, I meant the one used for invisible fencing, then i dont have to worry about the phone calls "Sirrus got out again!"

    when he gets out its their fault for not making him get back away from the door when they open it. Its an issue i stress over and over to them about.
    Did you know, today is yesterdays tomorrow and what you would leave for tomorrow you should do today?
    I am pro-Slaughter



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug. 21, 2007
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    650

    Default

    We got a radio collar for our dog. It is a wireless system(no wires in the ground), is portable, easy to set-up and fairly inexensive. I think we paid about $250 for ours. It has worked like a charm and my bratty aussie no longer takes tours of the neighborhood with me chasing him. It is made by petsafe and it is a viable alternative to putting a wire in the ground. Check into it, it was some of the best money we have spent.



  11. #11
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    Nov. 2, 2001
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cheval convert View Post
    We got a radio collar for our dog. It is a wireless system(no wires in the ground), is portable, easy to set-up and fairly inexensive. I think we paid about $250 for ours. It has worked like a charm and my bratty aussie no longer takes tours of the neighborhood with me chasing him. It is made by petsafe and it is a viable alternative to putting a wire in the ground. Check into it, it was some of the best money we have spent.
    Think it works on Red, the Horse as well?
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2005
    Location
    Northeast
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    10,467

    Talking

    Some posters seem to lacking in the reading comprehension department.

    OP was that not a horse agressively chasing dog? I have one that will chase one specific dog,who thought it was fun to play with said horse when he was two. Doggie found out rapidly that horses have not only teeth, but front feet, even when they are two.
    Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.



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