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  1. #1
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    Nov. 22, 2007
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    Default Artificial hoof care beats natural hoof care

    Once in a while hoof care professionals are faced with "natural problems" that are best met with artificial "solutions."

    If you ever run into one of "these" and decide to chop it all off in one trim, I recommend DURASOLE as the "solution" to dealing with the soft laminar wedge.

    Check out the album here:
    http://horseshoes.com/forums/album.php?albumid=119

    .



  2. #2
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    Apr. 7, 2005
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    With a dog named Rockstar
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    Default

    ah, we had one of those.
    (at the auction)
    http://s72.photobucket.com/albums/i1...nt=Pony020.jpg
    http://s72.photobucket.com/albums/i1...nt=Pony021.jpg

    Just after the first trim:
    http://s72.photobucket.com/albums/i1...=73.07001a.jpg

    Pony's sole's hadn't seen the light of day in years. We didn't use durasole or any other products... our time under the pony was very limited, even with enough sedation to bring down a baby rhino. Oh, did I mention she is tough as nails and 10 hands of fire? Didn't take a lame step after.

    My farrier said afterward: "It takes a very hard to kill a pony!" She recently (only 2 years after we first rescued her) got an adoptive home, with other vertically challenged equines.



  3. #3
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    Nov. 22, 2007
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    Default

    Once that soft laminar wedge is exposed it can suck up a lot of moisture, trap anaerobic pathogens, and then begin to rot the hoof from the inside out. The Durasole soaks into the laminar wedge and hardens it up enough that it is almost like having a hoof wall to protect the toe.

    Also in a day or two the laminar wedge shrinks a little because the Durasole continues to work as a desiccant. Thus you get a little more "breakover" relief in the toe while at the same time increasing the hardness of the laminar horn.

    IME, leaving the laminar wedge exposed without some kind of "chemical insurance" creates a ready made place to get an abcess started.



  4. #4
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    Oct. 19, 2005
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    Default

    What made you think you needed to pour Durasole on the stretched WL? My mine had that after foundering last year in March . He came around quickly with just trimming better diet and being removed from the place where they kept feeding him tons of after dinner mints, among other things.



  5. #5
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    Nov. 22, 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by BornToRide View Post
    What made you think you needed to pour Durasole on the stretched WL? My mine had that after foundering last year in March . He came around quickly with just trimming better diet and being removed from the place where they kept feeding him tons of after dinner mints, among other things.
    What I "think" is based on my experience with many situations like this over years and what I have learned from making mistakes and figuring out how to avoid them.

    If you haven't had the experience of MANY FAILURES in dealing with founder, then you really don't know what [edit] you are doing or what you are talking about.
    Last edited by Moderator 1; Apr. 11, 2009 at 08:23 PM. Reason: language



  6. #6
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    Nov. 5, 2007
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    Pennsylvania
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BornToRide View Post
    What made you think you needed to pour Durasole on the stretched WL? My mine had that after foundering last year in March . He came around quickly with just trimming better diet and being removed from the place where they kept feeding him tons of after dinner mints, among other things.
    So, with all your expertise on every subject you foundered your horse In addition you blame everybody else for your own equine mismanagement. Excellent post, love it

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Bloomer, CF, RJF View Post
    What I "think" is based on my experience with many situations like this over years and what I have learned from making mistakes and figuring out how to avoid them.

    If you haven't had the experience of MANY FAILURES in dealing with founder, then you really don't know what [edit] you are doing or what you are talking about.
    Well said Tom
    George
    Last edited by Moderator 1; Apr. 11, 2009 at 08:23 PM.



  7. #7
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    May. 3, 2006
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    Default

    Well said Tom.

    BTR the fact a horse in your ownership got laminitis disqualifies, rather than qualifies you as having experience of caring for such creatures.
    Last edited by Thomas_1; Apr. 11, 2009 at 01:37 PM.



  8. #8
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    Feb. 17, 2004
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    NY
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Bloomer, CF, RJF View Post
    Once in a while hoof care professionals are faced with "natural problems" that are best met with artificial "solutions."

    If you ever run into one of "these" and decide to chop it all off in one trim, I recommend DURASOLE as the "solution" to dealing with the soft laminar wedge.

    Check out the album here:
    http://horseshoes.com/forums/album.php?albumid=119

    .
    Yaaaawwwwwnnnnnn....

    What is your point here Tom? Nothing natural about the poor hoofcare this horse was receiving before you arrived. I'd say it was getting un-natural care by some A**Hat as my FUGLY hero likes to call people

    Any hoofcare professional that knows anything about anatomy could have done the same thing.

    I just did a pony like this 2 weeks ago, I didn't use up a bottle of Durasole, went back yesterday and horses feet were doing well, laminae hardened all on it's own. Maybe this is a good idea, I'll keep it mind on the next one.

    BTW, good job

    Kim



  9. #9
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    Feb. 17, 2004
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    NY
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas_1 View Post
    Well said Tom.

    BTR the fact a horse in your ownership got laminitis disqualifies, rather than qualifies you as having experience of caring for such creatures.
    Well far be it from me to stick up for BTR, but you've never had a lamintic horse Tom? Thats impressive. Good job.

    Kim



  10. #10
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    Oct. 19, 2005
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    Default

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Thomas_1

    BTR the fact a horse in your ownership got laminitis disqualifies, rather than qualifies you as having experience of caring for such creatures.[/i]
    Your life is obviously based primarily on continuous assumptions you make with little real facts.

    My mini is a prime example of what happens when people are willfully IGNORANT. He was given to me because the previous owners did not want to deal with his diet issues - he's prone to developing IR.

    After that he stayed with "friends" of mine who consistently ignored my feeding guidelines for an IR prone horse. THEY are the ones who caused his laminitis issues no matter how much I talked to them about NOT feeding him grains, molasses, alfalfa and after dinner mints. After all, a little here and there can't be that bad right?! TOTALLY WRONG! They just would not get it. They still don't.

    I finally had to get him our of there when he had another episode last March, which was also confirmed by blood testing and x-rays - he's been fine ever since now that he's away from ignorant people who don't want to get that there's a connection between diet and laminitis and founder.

    I think that the fact that he's been very healthy for over a year now very much qualifies me for caring for a laminitis/founder prone horse.
    Last edited by BornToRide; Apr. 11, 2009 at 01:45 PM.



  11. #11
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    Nov. 30, 2008
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    Washington
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    Default

    I've never had any trouble with abscessing in exposed laminar wedge and it is wetter than wet here. Here are some pics of my donkey when I first trimmed him, this is the reason I own a donkey, I couldn't leave him there.
    http://picasaweb.google.com/decorum1/5_22_2008#

    This week I trimmed another donkey that was not quite this bad, she only had 2 feet where the soles pointed straight forward.

    Ann Szolas



  12. #12
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    May. 3, 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by irishcas View Post
    Well far be it from me to stick up for BTR, but you've never had a lamintic horse Tom? Thats impressive. Good job.

    Kim
    No I've never had one of my own or one I'm responsible for that developed it. I don't consider it impressive though. I consider it basic animal husbandry and decent basic management and perhaps a little bit of good luck.

    I've had plenty brought to me that have it and to look after and currently have a highland pony that I'm managing back to good health.



  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by decorum View Post
    I've never had any trouble with abscessing in exposed laminar wedge and it is wetter than wet here. Here are some pics of my donkey when I first trimmed him, this is the reason I own a donkey, I couldn't leave him there.
    http://picasaweb.google.com/decorum1/5_22_2008#

    This week I trimmed another donkey that was not quite this bad, she only had 2 feet where the soles pointed straight forward.

    Ann Szolas
    Ditto that



  14. #14
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    Nov. 22, 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by decorum View Post
    I've never had any trouble with abscessing in exposed laminar wedge and it is wetter than wet here. Here are some pics of my donkey when I first trimmed him, this is the reason I own a donkey, I couldn't leave him there.
    http://picasaweb.google.com/decorum1/5_22_2008#

    This week I trimmed another donkey that was not quite this bad, she only had 2 feet where the soles pointed straight forward.

    Ann Szolas
    You didn't take off the toe flare or relieve the wedge on that one. Why not?



  15. #15
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    Nov. 22, 2007
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by irishcas View Post
    Nothing natural about the poor hoofcare this horse was receiving before you arrived.
    On the contrary, it was the result of what NATURE does to a domestic pony's hooves without ARTIFICIAL hoof care. There is nothing natural about any interaction between humans and equids unless it involves us being hunter gatherers and them being a food source.



  16. #16
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    May. 30, 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Bloomer, CF, RJF View Post
    If you ever run into one of "these" and decide to chop it all off in one trim, I recommend DURASOLE as the "solution" to dealing with the soft laminar wedge.
    I discovered this about 2 years ago only we used Keratex Hoof Hardener. The crosslinking qualities of these products transform all of that "rotted wood" looking stuff of a laminar wedge into a solid mass. The effect is almost magical.



  17. #17
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    Jan. 19, 2009
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    Pacific NW
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    Default In 40 years

    Quote Originally Posted by irishcas View Post
    Well far be it from me to stick up for BTR, but you've never had a lamintic horse Tom? Thats impressive. Good job.

    Kim
    In 40 years of horse experience, I never had one either....until the day I got cocky and decided the old boy that was just given to me with the instructions that he must wear shoes didn't really need them. Yes, he had a host of other complicating factors, but the sad truth was he did need those shoes.... lesson learned.....
    Turn off the computer and go ride!



  18. #18
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    Nov. 22, 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by rcloisonne View Post
    I discovered this about 2 years ago only we used Keratex Hoof Hardener. The crosslinking qualities of these products transform all of that "rotted wood" looking stuff of a laminar wedge into a solid mass. The effect is almost magical.
    Durasole is much more concentrated, works in 5 or10 minutes instead of 45 minutes, and costs about 70% less than Kertatex. Durasole comes in a spill proof bottle. If you knock over an open bottle of Keratex, you just lost $40 worth of product.

    I find the slower crosslinking action of Keratex to be beneficial on the hoof wall, but not very useful on the sole or liminar/white line areas where I want the horn to crosslink immediately while I am working on the horse.

    Keratex seems to work on a wet foot to harden the walls. Durasole seems to work better if you can dry the foot out first. I use several cases of Durasole each year. I use less than a single bottle of Keratex in a year . . . except when somebody knocks the bottle over - which has happened to me and several of my clients. Sho'nuff if you put the bottle on the floor and dip the brush into it, you will bump the brush into the bottle and knock it over. I think they designed the product to spill that way so they can sell more of it.



  19. #19
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    Nov. 30, 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Bloomer, CF, RJF View Post
    You didn't take off the toe flare or relieve the wedge on that one. Why not?
    I took him back all the way to the sole, what looks like flare is where his wall was so compressed from the curve of his toe. It just smashed the tubules until they were about 1/8" thick on the dorsal aspect of the wall. As that grew down he still did not have any toe wall until he got to the upper inch that you can see in that photo.

    I wish I had more pics of that first trim, I didn't take a single one of his lateral walls completely covering his soles.

    Here are pics 1 month later
    http://picasaweb.google.com/decorum1/6_26_2008#
    Notice the thin toe wall.

    Here he is 5 1/2 months after first trim, his heels opened up but his feet are still wonky.
    http://picasaweb.google.com/decorum1/EeTrimNov5#

    Ann Szolas



  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by decorum View Post
    I took him back all the way to the sole, what looks like flare is where his wall was so compressed from the curve of his toe. It just smashed the tubules until they were about 1/8" thick on the dorsal aspect of the wall. As that grew down he still did not have any toe wall until he got to the upper inch that you can see in that photo.

    I wish I had more pics of that first trim, I didn't take a single one of his lateral walls completely covering his soles.

    Here are pics 1 month later
    http://picasaweb.google.com/decorum1/6_26_2008#
    Notice the thin toe wall.

    Here he is 5 1/2 months after first trim, his heels opened up but his feet are still wonky.
    http://picasaweb.google.com/decorum1/EeTrimNov5#

    Ann Szolas
    Cool! Donkeys seem to be a lot more prone to whiteline rot. This one escaped it.



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