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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar. 14, 2007
    Posts
    2,332

    Default electrifying Ramm / Centaur

    Ok...fencing estimates are in, and I know for sure we're going with:
    3 rail flex for exterior, one strand vinyl hot coat on top.

    (Most likely for interior/cross fencing it will be combo fence...one rail at top for visibility if I have enough, and vinyl covered strands below....(still one rail electrified, though)

    Now. My guy hasn't even been behind elec. fence...but, some years back, when he was boarded at a farm that the owners didn't get home from work and bring horses in sometimes until around 9 pm, he began the habit of hanging at the gate, waiting, and would often chew on a rail, or a post.
    ugh. So....I've of course decided on the electrifying, to protect the flex rail investment, and hopefully keep him from chewing on the posts as well.

    Now. Fence manufacturer tells me if I wanted an additional hot coat strand between bottom and middle board as well, that it really would not add much cost at all.

    For those of you that have done this type fencing, do you find they 'pushed' through the bottom rails if there isn't (?) another strand of electrified? Any reason you would or wouldn't add it in my shoes?

    TIA

    ayrabz
    "Indecision may or may not be my problem"
    --Jimmy Buffett



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec. 29, 2006
    Posts
    51

    Default

    My horses have a similar setup. They do great, but the small pony limbos through it.
    You may want to look at kencove fencing too.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep. 9, 2008
    Posts
    372

    Default Electric Top Fence Rail

    I know that Ramm makes this and I think Centaur does, too ..... a 5" wide rail that is electrified at the top. You can tell the difference when you look at the white rail because it has a black top edge.

    Maybe you should just use the electrified rail at the top and the regular rails below (or the coated wire below depending on location). Then you would not have to have 3 rails of flex fence PLUS a coated electrified wire at the top.

    We are also in the planning mode for more fencing. We have no-climb horse wire right now and we need to put something along the top to keep my horse from leaning over and bending the wire. We have tried wooden rails, but if the wood is not really thick, it snaps. Plus it is so darned expensive. I have been wondering about using the electrified 5" rail. We need to put in some other fencing and I think we will use the electrified 5" rail on top and coated wire below.

    SCM1959



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun. 4, 2002
    Location
    Suffolk, VA
    Posts
    16,684

    Default

    I had three rails of Spur, a similar flexible rail, and I had major problems with horses pushing through it. I had foals pop out of it also. I hated it. I added electric tape between the rails (both top-middle and bottom-middle) and that solved my problems more or less. Now I just use Horseguard Electric tape...I saved a bundle and no more horses messing with the fence!



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep. 9, 2008
    Posts
    372

    Default

    Was the "Spur" flexible rail electrified?

    SCM1959



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov. 4, 2003
    Location
    Sanger, TX, USA
    Posts
    4,975

    Default

    Nope, the 4-inch Spur is non-electric although Centaur is thinking about.

    Ramm does not have an electrified 5-inch rail--only Centaur and it is called HotRail. We have customers who use it as a top rail, some use it as a top and bottom rail (with the
    electric edge closes to the ground to deter critters) and some use it for all four rails. The
    majority use it just for a top rail, though.

    How much the flex rail flexes depends somewhat on the post spacing and number of
    rails. 4 Rails and 8 foot post spacing makes a "tighter" fence than 3 rails and 12 foot post spacing. But the latter requires less work, less posts, less money for the rail due to fewer
    brackets required. Mine are on 3-rail in one area but they are teenage OTTB's and only occasionally stick a neck through. Horses do this on board fencingalso, especially 3 rail, but the board isn't as forgiving as the flexible rail.

    Some horses seem to respect a fence with just one strand of hot wire or White Lightning--
    others seem to figure out that the lower parts of the fence are "safe." We usually recommend to customers to go with four rail if they breed or use three rail with a strand
    of the electric coated wire or the non-electric in between the top and middle rail and the
    middle and bottom rail. Costwise, it is usually cheaper than adding a fourth rail. If they aren't sure if they need to electrify the "in-between" wires, we suggest choosing the electric and then if it is needed, all they have to do is add a charger.

    There's a ton of variables--how many horses, what kind, breeding or not, horses on other side of the fence lines, amount of space, how much grass, etc.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep. 9, 2008
    Posts
    372

    Default

    Whoops, sorry about confusing Centaur Hot Rail with Ramm. I have been looking at both sites so much lately that I am obviously all mixed up.

    We live in upstate SC and I really wish I could actually see some of this fencing rather than having to look at pictures. We are also a little leery of the installation process.

    I do think the flex fencing looks so nice in the photographs on the website.

    DOES the hotrail work to keep the horses from bothering the top rail if it is used across the top (in place of a separate flex rail plus a hot wire) ?

    SCM1959



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov. 4, 2003
    Location
    Sanger, TX, USA
    Posts
    4,975

    Default

    PM me with your address if you like and with any questions and will be happy to send you an installation DVD. And perhaps I can find an installation or two in your area as we have sold a lot in the Carolinas. Both brands are installed similiarly--the bracing of the corners and end/gate posts are critical and must be done according to the directions, lather, rinse and repeat. Can't emphasize that enough--line posts can be dug, driven or concreted in.

    The top rail of HotRail seems to work fine as we have customers reorder it when doing
    additional fencing.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct. 2, 1999
    Location
    Mendocino County, CA: Turkey Vulture HQ
    Posts
    14,850

    Default

    Just FYI, I have the plain flex rail, with no electric. I had horses try to chew it, but it bounced right out of their mouths, and they gave up after only a few tries. My top rail is at 5' (on posts 8' apart) and it has held up beautifully. I use it as the top rail for a no-climb fence and it has worked really well, though it was a bit challenging to figure out how to install it layered with the no-climb (ie, the top 3" of the no-climb is under or over the flex rail). I have pictures and tips for anyone else who wants to try that.

    I really love this fence. It looks good and I've done nothing to it since we installed it 5 years ago. But I would take BasqueMom's point about concreting in the corner posts very seriously - the fence won't be low maintenance if the posts won't stand up to the tension.

    I personally dislike electric fence, but if you're going to use it, the Centaur HotRail seems to be a good way to go. One thing to consider about adding a lower strand of electric is that it will also prevent you from slipping between the rails for easy access into pastures, and a lower strand is more likely to get touched by tall grasses and the like and short out the whole fence. It took me a while to realize that grass grows taller under the fences not just to be perverse but because dew collects on the fence and waters the ground directly under it. If it's an all-electric fence, that's just how it is, but for your example, you may want to wait and see. Once the posts are in place, to add in another electric strand later of some sort would be pretty easy.
    If you are allergic to a thing, it is best not to put that thing in your mouth, particularly if the thing is cats. - Lemony Snicket



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar. 14, 2007
    Posts
    2,332

    Default

    Thanks everyone.

    Julie is always such a help (!!) with the flex fence systems!

    Yes, I had originally only (!) considered Centaur...installer that I really was impressed with and appreciated, and the fact that they had the hot rail and Ramm didn't. However, it was a lot more expensive, and another bid from a well respected Ramm fence installer (for the past 15 years) was very competitive and he also will be helping convert an existing out building to stalls at the same time, so that won out.

    I agree with these fence systems, its the installation thats most important!

    Poltroon: never thought about the 'then you can't duck through' scenario with the added electrified coated wire midway....hmmmm...it would (!) always be a long walk back to where the gate will be.

    But I do know I'll at LEAST have the top elec. wire....its just too expensive for me not to 'protect' it from my mouthy pony.

    I think I'll be talking with installer about the costs to add it later if needed!

    Ok...while we're on the subject....
    for those who have electric....how do you place the water locations/offerings? I've been to a few farms where, at a cross fence area, they'll position the trough that can access both sides....But (!) I've also had a friend who's mare almost colicked on her when the water source was 'too close' to the fence for her to trust. (Other two horses drank fine but this mare was too leery of the electrified fence to approach the water)

    Have you found water placement to be an issue?
    ayrabz
    "Indecision may or may not be my problem"
    --Jimmy Buffett



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan. 15, 2004
    Location
    Lancaster, PA, USA
    Posts
    7,638

    Default

    I have one filly that learned early on to do the Ramm flexfence limbo. The bugger is still at it too as a 14.2H yearling. In the past I have had the occasional foal that has fallen/reached through it by accident. This is the first one that it is an intentional and ongoing thing ...except for a mini we had. I DID hotwire low for him and the bugger did not care. He would go past is as fast as possible. Hubby thought hte hotwire must not be working since putting the low wire on did not stop him....so he touched it to check it....HA HA HA. It worked...........bzzzzttt.....pony just did not care. After that the pony had to find a new home. I was not re-fencing the farm for a mini!



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct. 2, 1999
    Location
    Mendocino County, CA: Turkey Vulture HQ
    Posts
    14,850

    Default

    Pictures of my flex rail/no climb combo:
    http://www.ponydom.com/farm/farm8.html

    I have a place where a water trough is divided under some Horseguard fence. It works in that particular location because it is only minimal fencing, two strands. I have not had a problem with the horses being afraid of the water, but your mileage may vary. It is a BIG tank, 300 gallons IIRC, with fish.

    It was a tank that we just had on the property, and that was what we had available. If I was buying tanks and money not a problem, or if I had a horse that was worried, it would be simple enough to put two tanks back to back. Indeed, if I had a decent fence there, with a low enough lowest strand, it would not be possible to slide a tank under the fence.

    ayrabz, if you're back-and-forth on the lower electric strand, another option might be to put it in, but ask them to put a switch in at both ends, so that you can leave it off when convenient while still electrifying the top. Then, if problem horse arrives, you can power it on as needed.
    If you are allergic to a thing, it is best not to put that thing in your mouth, particularly if the thing is cats. - Lemony Snicket



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