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  1. #1
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    Default 2 Case Studies of Chronic Laminitis from Auburn U

    Links to AAEP manuscript and very good photos of radigraphs :
    Actually it's 4 studies, my mistake.

    http://www.hoofrehab.com/AuburnUvetschool.htm



  2. #2
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    Very cool - hopefully this will open many eyes and we will get away faster from traditional laminitis management via shoeing and wedging that tends to have a rather poor prognosis.



  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by BornToRide View Post
    Very cool - hopefully this will open many eyes and we will get away faster from traditional laminitis management via shoeing and wedging that tends to have a rather poor prognosis.
    So, how many shod and wedged horses are they using for comparison?



  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by BornToRide View Post
    Very cool - hopefully this will open many eyes and we will get away faster from traditional laminitis management via shoeing and wedging that tends to have a rather poor prognosis.
    Like I said before," if Pete were to stop quickly, the lights would go out for you"



  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Katy Watts View Post
    So, how many shod and wedged horses are they using for comparison?
    it's a 4 horse study



  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Katy Watts View Post
    So, how many shod and wedged horses are they using for comparison?
    All they have to do is research vet files that contain such information.

    Like I said before," if Pete were to stop quickly, the lights would go out for you"
    Of course you would not have anything contructive to say if something obviously is working and then so against your grain in addition to that. At least you'll be forever blissful



  7. #7
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    BornToRide...
    Of course you would not have anything contructive to say if something obviously is working and then so against your grain in addition to that. At least you'll be forever blissful
    ain't i cute!!



  8. #8
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    Thanks for posting the article. It's very interesting. Having worked on a few horses laying down under anesthesia now I can say it's a lot harder than it looks!



  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daydream Believer View Post
    Thanks for posting the article. It's very interesting. Having worked on a few horses laying down under anesthesia now I can say it's a lot harder than it looks!
    Zebras are harder!



  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.D. View Post
    ain't i cute!!
    Oh yes you are!! You can stop by my farm anytime and..... read my xrays.

    Clever and smart too

    Kim



  11. #11
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    Default ::Gasp::

    The link the OP referenced says:
    "it would be the first time a successful method of reversing chronic laminitis has been published".

    Whoops.

    For comparison, a published paper in a peer-reviewed journal, with a control group of 133 feet, fresh out of UPenn:

    Journal of Equine Veterinary Science
    Volume 29, Issue 2, February 2009, Pages 115-117

    The Long-Term Results of Glue-on Shoes on Dorsal Hoof Wall Distortion


    "The study group consisted of front feet of horses shod exclusively in the Sigafoos glue-on shoe for a period of 1 year, and the control group consisted of 133 front feet from horses using nailed on shoes for a similar period and with a musculoskeletal complaint. The results indicate a 48% reduction in dorsal wall deviation for the study group. This finding supports the use of this glue-on shoe as beneficial with the goal to reduce capsular distortion of the dorsal wall."

    http://www.sciencedirect.com/science...021c50316a2c5a



    Then there's that whole other thread I posted, about an article from 1997 which is still one of the most emailed articles from The Horse.... that still holds a lot more data, information and value than some pictures of a horse on a horse is lateral recumbency with it's legs roped...

    but maybe it's just me
    Last edited by FatPalomino; Mar. 31, 2009 at 08:47 PM.



  12. #12
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    The rads are undeniable. And rotation and sinking are very different than "flares, dished toes, under-run heels, and cracks." That study had nothing to do at all w/laminitic horses. It was all about distortion in the hoof wall - not the same thing, not even close, except for that they are all horses hooves.
    "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
    ---
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.



  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.D. View Post
    Zebras are harder!
    The worst yet I've done is a mini donk. He just lays down if he gets ticked off at me! My unconscious horse client was a Corolla Banker Stallion who was pulled off the island for a deformed and lame hoof. He was way too wild to handle any other way.



  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.D. View Post
    Zebras are harder!
    But aren't jackasses the worst?



  15. #15
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    Theres' something odd about the two cases compared to each other. For some reason they extend the line along the coffin bone up past the pastern but don't make any comments on it. I know they're using it to measure lamellar horn zone but they extend it way past that. The first one remains parallel to the pastern but in case #2 it cuts into the pastern into a meaningless fashion, indicating a sort of broken angled coffin joint. I wonder which one they think is correct since they make no remark on it.



  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by EqTrainer View Post
    It was all about distortion in the hoof wall - not the same thing, not even close, except for that they are all horses hooves.
    Laminitis has nothing to do with the dorsal hoof wall?? or lameness? or problems with maintaining the proper structure of the hoof?

    Here's another peer reviewed paper worth looking at, in the same month's publication:
    http://www.j-evs.com/article/S0737-0...435-8/abstract
    Laminitis in Horses: Through the Lens of Systems Theory

    or
    Correlation of Plasma Insulin Concentration with Laminitis Score in a Field Study of Equine Cushing's Disease and Equine Metabolic Syndrome
    http://www.j-evs.com/article/S0737-0...432-2/abstract

    Ok, want to stay with the "4 horse study". Here you go, just a bit more scientific :
    Short-Term Effects of Duodenocecostomy on Body Weight, Glucose Absorption, Serum Components, and Intestinal Histopathology in Four Normal Horses
    http://www.j-evs.com/article/S0737-0...015-X/abstract

    Much better 'reads', IMHO.

    Can you argue that these links could not be a reference for comparison, for example, to show the difference between a blog entry and a peer reviewed paper??

    Androcles makes a good point, which I hope is elaborated on, about the angles on #2.
    Last edited by FatPalomino; Mar. 31, 2009 at 09:09 PM.



  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by FatPalomino View Post
    Laminitis has nothing to do with the dorsal hoof wall?? or lameness? or problems with maintaining the proper structure of the hoof?

    Here's another peer reviewed paper worth looking at, in the same month's publication:
    http://www.j-evs.com/article/S0737-0...435-8/abstract
    Laminitis in Horses: Through the Lens of Systems Theory

    or
    Correlation of Plasma Insulin Concentration with Laminitis Score in a Field Study of Equine Cushing's Disease and Equine Metabolic Syndrome
    http://www.j-evs.com/article/S0737-0...432-2/abstract

    Ok, want to stay with the "4 horse study". Here you go, just a bit more scientific :
    Short-Term Effects of Duodenocecostomy on Body Weight, Glucose Absorption, Serum Components, and Intestinal Histopathology in Four Normal Horses
    http://www.j-evs.com/article/S0737-0...015-X/abstract

    Much better 'reads', IMHO.

    Can you argue that these links could not be a reference for comparison, for example, to show the difference between a blog entry and a peer reviewed paper??

    Androcles makes a good point, which I hope is elaborated on, about the angles on #2.
    Perhaps Dr. Taylor would appreciate and benefit from your insight regarding laminitis and navilcular issues. She is evidently out of the loop.I think her contact info is readily available.



  18. #18
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    I think this is an interesting study, and look forward to continued updates. I have no dog in the fight in regards to barefoot vs shod. I currently have horses in both types. I think that given the number of horses that succumb to laminitic issues any progress regardless of an individuals particular fondness for barefoot vs shod should be looked at carefully and potentially learned from. Thanks to the OP for sharing, it is certainly food for thought.



  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by AZ Native View Post
    Perhaps Dr. Taylor would appreciate and benefit from your insight regarding laminitis and navilcular issues. She is evidently out of the loop.

    I could have sworn someone once told me that nearly all vet's, esp. the ones in university settings, don't have a clue about hoof care and get no training in school for it, are are oh so naive.



  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Androcles View Post
    Theres' something odd about the two cases compared to each other. For some reason they extend the line along the coffin bone up past the pastern but don't make any comments on it. I know they're using it to measure lamellar horn zone but they extend it way past that. The first one remains parallel to the pastern but in case #2 it cuts into the pastern into a meaningless fashion, indicating a sort of broken angled coffin joint. I wonder which one they think is correct since they make no remark on it.
    These lines are typically drawn by vets to measure a degree of rotation. The point of intersection of the two lines allows them to measure the angle of the coffin bone relative to the angle of the dorsal hoof wall. It's not relevant to the pastern in this context. You'll notice in the "after" rads the lines are parallel, so would never intersect and thus are measured at zero degrees.



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