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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr. 17, 2008
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    879

    Default Reasonable offer?

    I am looking at a horse offered for sale at 5k but also open to offers. Of course I would like to pay the lowest I can but I don't want to offend his owner by too low of an offer. Of course we can also counter offer until we come up with something agreeable though. Would offering 3k at first be way too low? My trainer said to go with 3k at first but is that really reasonable?

    Here is a little background on this horse: I have ridden him a few times and he has a lot going for him. He is rusty though. He probably has had the past year or so off. He was just worked here and there, but not on a regular work routine. He knows his stuff but it will take some work to get him back into shape and going again. His owner has her own business that has given her hardly any time for any of her horses, so she is selling him and her other horses. He is sound to my eyes but of course my vet will be giving him a full PPE to confirm everything is ok. He has great bloodlines, registered warmblood and does have some show experience in the past. I believe his last show was in 2007. I don't believe his owner is in desperate need of money, in fact she is pretty well off. She just wants to find him a home where he will have a job and be loved. I can do just that! Do you think 3k is an ok offer to start out with without offending his owner or what would be more reasonable?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan. 14, 2003
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    6,009

    Default

    What do you think he's worth? Do you feel 5k is a reasonable price but want to nickle and dime the owner down as much as possible or do you feel he isn't quite worth the asking price in the current economy? 5k is not much for a nice horse.

    If you are determined to mpay as little as possible, then just make the offer and see what happens. The worst she can do is say no. If she outright refuses and you really want him then offer her more. I would say that you do take the risk of offending the owner with that type of offer but so what? Of course her level of offense might be different depending on if you are a 17 y.o. who has been saving for her first horse as opposed to pulling up in a 60k car. If she is most concerned with sending him to a good home then she may not care so much about the price, especially if she has been trying to sell him for a while. I have to say, if it were me though, and I was concerned about a good home and thought I'd priced the horse at a very reasonable price then I might wonder how good of a home my horse was going to.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb. 8, 2004
    Location
    Rolling hills of Virginny
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    5,967

    Default

    I think only offering the seller 60% of her asking price might very well offend her.

    If you really, really like the horse and he's as nice as you say, why not offer her 80-85% of her price? That would be $4,000-$4,250.

    As you said, the seller isn't hurting for money, so why would she accept your lowball offer?

    You can offer any price you like, but don't be surprised if she turns you down flat. $5,000 for a really nice horse isn't that expensive.
    The plural of anecdote is not data.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug. 2, 2000
    Location
    Chesterland, OH USA
    Posts
    2,775

    Default

    I just offered about 70% of the list price and they accepted it.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov. 20, 2003
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    578

    Default

    Why not just ask the seller what is the lowest she will go?
    Things Take Time



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec. 26, 2004
    Location
    Suburbs of Cleveland, OH
    Posts
    522

    Default

    How old is he? What kind of training/showing did he have in the past? What price range are horses like him going for in your area? Look at comparable horses in the area and figure out what you think is fair for him and offer it.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug. 2, 2000
    Location
    Chesterland, OH USA
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    2,775

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kmp2707 View Post
    Why not just ask the seller what is the lowest she will go?
    When I was selling a horse, I absolutely HATED when people asked me this question!!! I have made the first step in the negotiation by setting a list price. It is the potential buyer's turn to give a number.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr. 17, 2008
    Posts
    879

    Default

    I think he is worth the 5k bloodlines and his breed alone to be honest, so anything under 5k or even 5k will be a deal to me. My husband however isn't a horsey person. This will be our first horse purchase together, even though he will be my horse. To him each horse is the same. He wants me to offer the lowest possible and after hearing my trainer say to offer 3k, then he wants me to go with that. Maybe my trainer forgot that fact that at his asking price he is a steal already. He isn't like one of her 20k+ warmbloods she is trying to unload, so getting an offer 2k off isn't as huge of deal. Of course it doesn't hurt to ask but I don't want to offend his owner and if she counter offers hopefully we can strike a deal.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec. 26, 2004
    Location
    Suburbs of Cleveland, OH
    Posts
    522

    Default

    Wow, would love to hear trainer's reaction when somebody offers 12k for one of her 20k horses... geesh.

    You've said what the horse is worth to you and what you're already planning on offering, which is way less - so what is the actual question?

    If someone offered me close to 1/2 my asking price on a horse that was already priced low I would be offended and not want to deal with that person at all unless I was completely desperate to sell said horse.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr. 18, 2000
    Location
    ~~~Virginia Horse Country~~~
    Posts
    6,855

    Default

    If you offered her the 3K and it offended her and at whatever price you agreed upon I would think a vetting would be another insult on such an inexpensive horse. Your vetting could cost you another 1K.
    http://www.talloaksfarm.net ---"Success is not final, failure is not fatal; it is the courage to continue that counts." --- Winston Churchill



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr. 17, 2008
    Posts
    879

    Default

    I haven't made any offers yet. I just wanted to get some opinions because I feel weird offering only 3k and I guess my gut instinct was right after reading most of these comments.

    Maybe I should offer 5k for one of my trainers horses.

    BTW I am completely clueless about horse purchasing. I have owned 3 horses before but I was lucky enough to have my parents buy them for me. I just had to ride them and see if I like them back then. Now that I am all grown up and on my own, this will be my first purchase on my own. I think I am overanalyzing it too much and it's freaking me out.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    May. 1, 2006
    Location
    Tampa, FL
    Posts
    567

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by talloaks View Post
    If you offered her the 3K and it offended her and at whatever price you agreed upon I would think a vetting would be another insult on such an inexpensive horse. Your vetting could cost you another 1K.
    an additional 1k spent on a pre-purchase exam on a "cheap" horse could have saved me the $3k I ended up spending in vet bills after the fact
    I won't buy another one no matter what the price without a PPE
    Last edited by RomeosGirl; Mar. 31, 2009 at 05:04 PM. Reason: spelling



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct. 30, 2006
    Posts
    3,381

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Paddys Mom View Post
    When I was selling a horse, I absolutely HATED when people asked me this question!!! I have made the first step in the negotiation by setting a list price. It is the potential buyer's turn to give a number.
    Me too. Cars for that matter. Why would I even bother putting a price down at all if you call and I give you a completely different price just because you asked how low I'd go?

    Anyway, OP. I kind of agree $3,000 might be a little insulting. It's kind of a delicate matter, and I don't think there is any 'right' way to go about it. I don't think I would offer less than $3500. Like some people say you will never know what price they will take unless you ask, but still, you don't want to totally offend that person or make them think you are financially unable to buy/care for the horse...

    If you do a full PPE on the horse, you're going to be looking at probably $1k-$1500. So here's how I would approach this...I would first tell the woman your intentions with the horse...where you're going to keep him, what you'll be doing with him, etc, paint a nice picture about how this horse will be best off with you. Then I would mention that you have several references that can vouch for that (trainer, vet, friends). Then perhaps bring up the price, and say you were hoping she might be negotiable, so that after the PPE, hauling, trainer commission, you could come in under $5k total...then make your offer.
    Quote Originally Posted by barka.lounger View Post
    u get big old crop and bust that nags ass the next time it even slow down.

    we see u in gp ring in no time.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan. 23, 2007
    Location
    Hampshire, IL
    Posts
    778

    Default

    I never worry about offending the seller. I offer what the horse is worth.

    my horse was listed for $10K I got him for a little over $3.5K

    ... results not typical - breeder is a crazy old horse trader and over-lists everything on the farm



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Sep. 14, 1999
    Location
    Just Enough Farm, GA
    Posts
    2,228

    Default

    I think if you're just trying to make sure you're not leaving money on the table by paying more than the owner would take, then you may be starting the dance a little too low. If it's a matter of $3K is all you've got to spend, then say that and ask if they're interested in talking further.
    If you believe everything you read, better not read. -- Japanese Proverb




  16. #16
    Join Date
    Aug. 21, 2004
    Location
    looking for roadsigns
    Posts
    435

    Default Depends on the situation

    Do the owners really just want a token payment? And do you really want/need the horse?
    Be up front. Say you really like him, you think he may be worth more, but that's what you have to spend right now -- and then be able to afford to put him into training, or move him to a good facility, or whatever the reason is you don't want to spend the money. And tell them you're not trying to be insulting, he's a nice horse, and you understand if they want to keep looking.
    I purchased the 10k, then 7,500, then please make us an offer horse for $500. No missing zero. That's exactly what he would have brought at auction... and the owners agreed he may have been worth more to someone, but they didn't have time or interest in showing him to a bunch of people to find that person. Selling a horse is time consuming and frustrating. Just read all the threads here grumping about tire kickers, no-shows, and crazies.
    Last edited by actcasual; Mar. 31, 2009 at 11:55 PM.
    "I never panic when I get lost. I just change where I want to go."
    -Rita Rudner



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Aug. 1, 2003
    Location
    Georgia.
    Posts
    2,370

    Default

    The way I see it is offering only 60% of the asking price and potentially offending the seller may hurt future negotiations. If you offer 3k then the seller may think you are just tire kicking and not serious. The seller then might counter back at 5k. So how would you counter then???

    If you think the horse is fairly priced, I would offer 80-85% of the asking price. Of course I guess it also depends on how much you like the horse.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Oct. 31, 2001
    Location
    West of insanity, east of apathy, deep in the heart of Texas.
    Posts
    15,797

    Thumbs down

    As a seller with a home and two horses on the market (one "expensive", one not), I can tell you that I would be totally offended if offered 60% of the asking price. And, I'd not be inclined to come down one penny.

    IME, if you want something and you think it's priced fairly, make a reasonable offer - like 10% off the asking price. It expresses legitimate interest, but gives the seller room to be generous and come down a bit. In short, it makes negotiation more possible, and much more pleasant. If someone were to offer me $3K for a very fairly priced $5K horse, I'd assume they weren't really interested in the horse, but in a "deal", and I'd tell them to go jump in the nearest lake. If, as you say, the seller doesn't really NEED the money, she's interested in getting the best possible home for her horse. If you present yourself as a cheapskate, she's not going to think you're the proper home for her horse, and probably turn you down flat.

    JMO.
    In loving memory of Laura Jahnke.
    A life lived by example, done too soon.
    www.caringbridge.org/page/laurajahnke/



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Apr. 18, 2000
    Location
    ~~~Virginia Horse Country~~~
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    6,855

    Default

    Just remember that a seller doesn't have to accept your low offer, nor does she have to counter offer, she can just say no deal. That is the chance you take with a low ball offer, or any offer really.
    http://www.talloaksfarm.net ---"Success is not final, failure is not fatal; it is the courage to continue that counts." --- Winston Churchill



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Oct. 31, 2001
    Location
    West of insanity, east of apathy, deep in the heart of Texas.
    Posts
    15,797

    Cool

    I just re-read your original post. Let's see if I got the gist of it this time.

    You've ridden this horse a few times, and like him. He's a warmblood, not too old, who "knows his stuff", has a show record, but is a bit rusty. He's apparently sound, and he's priced at $5K, and you want to offer less.

    You're kidding, right?
    In loving memory of Laura Jahnke.
    A life lived by example, done too soon.
    www.caringbridge.org/page/laurajahnke/



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