The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 39
  1. #1
    Join Date
    May. 10, 2003
    Location
    central CA
    Posts
    1,503

    Question How much ace for dogs

    I rarely need to, but have reason to ace my dog this weekend and I can't find the paper where I wrote down the dosage. She's 60#, I'm thinking it was 1/4 cc, but actual knowledge would help.
    Don't toy with the dragon, for you are crunchy and good with ketchup!



  2. #2
    Join Date
    May. 24, 2006
    Posts
    2,896

    Default

    You should ask your vet...ace is a completely different dosage on dogs, I always use oral ace for my dogs.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2007
    Location
    Pen Argyl PA
    Posts
    4,030

    Default

    Don't ever use Ace on Sighthounds or Chinese Cresteds. They have a difficult time metabolizing some Anesthesia, and Ace can kill them. It's b/c they have less body fat than most other dogs.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb. 13, 2007
    Location
    Down on the Farm
    Posts
    3,056

    Default

    Funny, I was wondering this same thing last night... I have a Westie that needs to go to the groomers, he is going to be awful (I do clip him myself but thought he deserved a good haircut )... I was thinking around a quarter, but he is only 15 pounds... I'm going to to call my vet.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec. 28, 2007
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    87

    Default

    I was reading the bottle the other day...it's 0.05 mg per kg for horses, and I think 0.10 mg per kg for dogs? Don't quote me on that though.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec. 22, 2008
    Location
    MA
    Posts
    688

    Default

    Ace should NEVER be used on Boxers or Boxer mixes either.

    The bottle I have says 0.25-1mg per lb of body weight...so the max dose you would give a 60lb dog would be 60mg.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    May. 24, 2006
    Posts
    2,896

    Default

    Ace is a very cheap drug from your small animal vet, so why mess around with the injectable which is very difficult to properly dose in dogs, particularly smaller ones. I am not a spendthrift, but there are some things that you just should not mess with.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar. 20, 2007
    Posts
    427

    Default

    CHECK WITH YOUR VET!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Ace affects different dogs differently (even members of the same breed), and even can affect the SAME dog differently from one dose to another. And some dogs react VERY badly to ace -- sometimes on the initial introduction, sometimes after having used it previously with no problem.

    Please don't take a chance on it, ace is not one of the meds that you can take a short-cut with and prescribe yourself, at least, not unless that particular dog has been monitored in previous applications of the identical dosage prescribed by a vet.

    Benedryl might be a better choice for mild sedation, but again, please check with your vet.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr. 7, 2005
    Location
    With a dog named Rockstar
    Posts
    2,990

    Default

    Don't trust what's on the bottle. It's not the same dose that's used in practice. Ace has some serious hypotensive effects.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct. 1, 2002
    Location
    Cow County, MD
    Posts
    7,106

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Riley0522 View Post
    Ace should NEVER be used on Boxers or Boxer mixes either.


    I've been in practice for 14 years and used Ace on just about every breed of dog under the sun, sighthounds and Boxers included. I've worked in emergency and speciality practices and have never heard anything like this.

    Now, a seizure dog, that's a different animal. Ace lowers the seizure threshold.

    I've seen a dog get three ccs of Ace and live. I've seen the same size dog get overdosed on oral Ace. There's a reason it's a prescription item. Consult your vet.
    Life would be infinitely better if pinatas suddenly appeared throughout the day.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    May. 10, 2003
    Location
    central CA
    Posts
    1,503

    Default

    Don't know what breeds, etc. I use it on my lab every year for fireworks, just couldn't remember the dosage. Talked w/the vet this am and the horse im, given orally to a dog would be at the rate of 1/2cc per 100#. Thanks though.
    Don't toy with the dragon, for you are crunchy and good with ketchup!



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep. 17, 2003
    Location
    Fort Myers, Florida
    Posts
    2,667

    Default Found this:

    http://www.vetinfo.com/dogace.html

    it does mention Boxers. Interesting info as I have used Benadryl with no results on a tightly wound GSD.
    I will get it from my Vet though for sure.
    "My treasures do not sparkle or glitter, they shine in the sunlight and nicker to me in the night"



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep. 22, 2008
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    1,930

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Riley0522 View Post
    Ace should NEVER be used on Boxers or Boxer mixes either.

    The bottle I have says 0.25-1mg per lb of body weight...so the max dose you would give a 60lb dog would be 60mg.
    THIS IS ORAL ACE!!!!! PLEASE PLEASE if we're oing to discuss dosages of perscription drugs (which is ILLEGAL for a reason!) please be very very clear about oral versus injectable.

    Ace can be used in every breed under the sun, and can be used with seizure dogs, but as someone else said this is only under a vet's supervision, as any dog can have a fatal reaction to any sedative or anesthetic on any given day.

    A lot of dogs can overpower ace as well, and if they do it makes them even more hypersensitive and freaked out than they would have been without it. Hence why it's always good to check with your vet before using it, and knowing how your dog will react.

    Also, here's an article form a site I know and trust, which addresses the Boxer issue at the bottom.
    http://www.veterinarypartner.com/Con...&S=0&C=0&A=570

    Katherine
    Vet Tech
    Last edited by Horsegal984; Mar. 19, 2009 at 10:41 PM. Reason: add link



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan. 9, 2006
    Location
    the land of sky-blue waters
    Posts
    622

    Default

    It's not illegal to discuss dosages of prescription drugs. It's illegal to prescribe and dispense without a license.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Sep. 22, 2008
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    1,930

    Default

    Some of the posters here are getting into a grey area, at least as far as the NC veterinary medical board laws go.

    Either way some of this info is potentially very dangerous, since noone has actually been clear on oral versus injectable dosages, and in dogs at least there is a HUGE difference.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2007
    Location
    Pen Argyl PA
    Posts
    4,030

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Sing Mia Song View Post


    I've been in practice for 14 years and used Ace on just about every breed of dog under the sun, sighthounds and Boxers included. I've worked in emergency and speciality practices and have never heard anything like this.

    Now, a seizure dog, that's a different animal. Ace lowers the seizure threshold.

    I've seen a dog get three ccs of Ace and live. I've seen the same size dog get overdosed on oral Ace. There's a reason it's a prescription item. Consult your vet.
    Well, Maybe no one ever told you before. I have been on Chinese Crested forums and Most of the people told me to warn my vet when my dog got spayed, so when i called my Vet, He already knew not to use it on Sighthounds or Chinese Cresteds. . Just b/c you never had a problem, does not mean it won't happen. IMO, if you are a vet it's better to be safe than sorry. there are alternatives out there.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Dec. 22, 2008
    Location
    MA
    Posts
    688

    Default

    Sorry! Didn't see the "cc" in her original post. But yes, obviously there is a difference between oral and injectable meds in anything, humans, dogs horses. Drugs are metabolized differently in the gut versus the tissue, and more often they can be more dangerous in the injectable form and you should check with your vet before giving anything you're not sure of!

    I don't even use the Ace on my dogs, just have it leftover from my horse when I tranq'd him for his first turnout after 6 months of stall rest.

    And as for the Boxer thing, I've had more than a couple vets/shelter staff/etc tell me that it is unsafe to use it in Boxers. Maybe under a vet's supervision is fine, but I was just passing on some info I knew if it were to be given at home.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Apr. 7, 2005
    Location
    With a dog named Rockstar
    Posts
    2,990

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Sing Mia Song View Post


    I've been in practice for 14 years and used Ace on just about every breed of dog under the sun, sighthounds and Boxers included. I've worked in emergency and speciality practices and have never heard anything like this.

    Now, a seizure dog, that's a different animal. Ace lowers the seizure threshold.
    There is some debate about this, however, we stay on the safe side and don't use it in Boxers. The story goes that it lowers the seizure threshold particularly in Boxers. Every clinic I have worked in has agreed: No Ace in Boxers. Why risk it?

    There was a big discussion about this on VIN maybe a year or two ago.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2000
    Location
    MA
    Posts
    12,819

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Nezzy View Post
    Don't ever use Ace on Sighthounds or Chinese Cresteds. They have a difficult time metabolizing some Anesthesia, and Ace can kill them. It's b/c they have less body fat than most other dogs.

    Acepromazine is perfectly safe to use in sighthounds, if being administered by a licensed veterinarian. It is commonly used in anesthesia premed protocols, and I have seen it recommended in the treatment of malignant hyperthermia in greyhounds.

    I have checked with veterinary anesthesiologists on this issue. I do think they have more credibility than a Chinese crested mailing list.

    It is metabolized in the liver, and eliminated in the urine, so body fat isn't a player here.

    The lack of body fat and anesthesia issues seem to be a sort of "telephone game" rationale for all sorts of things.

    Older anesthetic gases (halothane) are redistributed in adipose tissue during anesthesia.

    Therefore metabolism of these gases differed significantly in dogs with minimal body fat.
    So sight hounds, young animals with little body fat, or thin dogs of any breed required lower levels/closer monitoring when halothane was used.

    I'm not sure halothane is even readily available now. there are much newer and safer anesthetic gases out there, though.
    "It's like a Russian nesting doll of train wrecks."--CaitlinandTheBay

    ...just settin' on the Group W bench.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2007
    Location
    Pen Argyl PA
    Posts
    4,030

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ghazzu View Post
    Acepromazine is perfectly safe to use in sighthounds, if being administered by a licensed veterinarian. It is commonly used in anesthesia premed protocols, and I have seen it recommended in the treatment of malignant hyperthermia in greyhounds.

    I have checked with veterinary anesthesiologists on this issue. I do think they have more credibility than a Chinese crested mailing list.

    It is metabolized in the liver, and eliminated in the urine, so body fat isn't a player here.

    The lack of body fat and anesthesia issues seem to be a sort of "telephone game" rationale for all sorts of things.

    Older anesthetic gases (halothane) are redistributed in adipose tissue during anesthesia.

    Therefore metabolism of these gases differed significantly in dogs with minimal body fat.
    So sight hounds, young animals with little body fat, or thin dogs of any breed required lower levels/closer monitoring when halothane was used.

    I'm not sure halothane is even readily available now. there are much newer and safer anesthetic gases out there, though.
    Why take the chance? WHY?

    This is not a 'mailing list" it is a forum of Chinese Crested owners who either LOST a dog to this or have been warned by their OWN vets about this. YES, vets have warned the owners so they know for future surgeries. These people have dealt with this personally. That is why Ace and Ketamine are not allowed when i have my dog in surgery. Gee, if my vet already KNEW about it, then YES it is true. ANd My groomer is involved big time with Greyhound rescue and she knew all about it too. Oh, i guess we must be all making it up for no good reason.



Similar Threads

  1. The Lost Dogs, Michael Vick's dogs by Jim Gorant
    By threedogpack in forum Off Topic
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: Oct. 14, 2013, 11:19 AM
  2. Replies: 19
    Last Post: Aug. 30, 2011, 03:46 PM
  3. Replies: 17
    Last Post: Jan. 17, 2011, 04:22 PM
  4. Bloodhounds as farm dogs? Hardy enough to be outdoor dogs?
    By asb_own_me in forum Around The Farm
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: Oct. 9, 2009, 04:14 PM
  5. Men with dogs vs. Women with dogs: A dilemma
    By Haalter in forum Around The Farm
    Replies: 28
    Last Post: Jul. 22, 2009, 03:58 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness