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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Apr. 1, 2008
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    4,690

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    I taught the dogs to walk through a foot bath. That really helped to cut down on the dirt and mud.

    Then I ripped up the carpeting to find hardwood under. That also helped.



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Aug. 28, 2006
    Posts
    10,989

    Default

    You need a bucket of Oxyclean for stains if you have carpet. Put a scoop of Oxyclean in a plastic bottle, add water, shake, scrub, cover with towel and let sit. It may take more than 1 application and 1 day but Oxyclean will get stains out of carpet, thank goodness.



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Oct. 2, 2007
    Location
    Mirabel, QC
    Posts
    2,656

    Default

    Give up and strip the carpet.

    Those of us with pets *know* that carpet is a PIA.
    www.EquusMagnificus.ca
    Breeding & Sales - Currently: Eventing & Derby prospects
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  4. #24
    Join Date
    Aug. 20, 2007
    Posts
    165

    Default

    Yes to oxyclean! BUT do not leave it too long as it will make part of the carpet lighter if not rinsed out. I'm wondering what would happen if i just poured a giant tup of oxyclean mixed over the whole carpet



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2005
    Location
    Mass.
    Posts
    6,749

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    Good luck. I have a mud pit for a back yard and "lovely" beige Berber carpet on my second floor with hardwood on the first floor. It's amazing how much mud makes it to the second floor on the feet of two dogs! If you go with a commercial cleaning company, I recommend one that uses the "Chem-Dry" process instead of steam cleaning. It sounds icky ("Chem" dry???) but it does work a lot better than regular steam cleaning, and your carpets dry MUCH faster afterwards.
    I realize that I'm generalizing here, but as is often the case when I generalize, I don't care. ~ Dave Barry



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Apr. 7, 2005
    Location
    With a dog named Rockstar
    Posts
    2,997

    Default

    Has anyone mentioned how easy it is to remove carpet and install Pergo? We'll probably never have anything else. It's wonderful!



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jan. 8, 2009
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    23

    Default

    we too had the pro steamer, it didn't work that well. ( well it worked better till my 70 year old mum thought it was a vacuum and vacuumed the floors with it one day) looked good for a couple of days, the rest is history....We have 3500 square feet, all bottom floor is wood. We have 6 dogs all live in the house and because we also foster we have had up to 8 dogs in the house. Question to lady with pergo floors: are they as robust as they claim? our down stairs floors with 6 dogs chasing, playin ect!? they are torched !!! the rest of the house is cream carpet which includes a third floor. Although we, now, keeps the dogs from the second and third floors they manage to bash the stair gates down periodically, or we forget to shut them, and they have left calling cards, which includes everything they can produce from every oriffice.

    I never realised that there was a company that took up carpet, took it away and cleaned it ! WOW! I will look into that one....

    However, what I have found that works, pretty well on bad stains and the smell too is:- and this will only work on light ie white or cream coloured carpet, is a Hydrogen peroxide solution. I put it in a sprayer, spray it on leave long enough to soak in and then use thick wads of kitchen roll to take out the excess liquid along with the stain....

    If I didn't have such a large area of space versus stain this would work well for me.... although I have sprayed most patches with the solution and the house really doesn't smell of dogs...it's cheap and well worth a try....



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Oct. 2, 2007
    Location
    Beyond the pale.
    Posts
    2,957

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    The only reason we found out that a restoration company can take the wall to wall out and clean it is because we had a flood the first year we were here, and of course, being on septic field...I won't spell it out, but I figured the carpets would need replacing. The insurance company sent over the restoration guys and that is how we got our old carpet back good as new. Well, I would've preferred new, ços the colour sucks, but that is not the flood or the company's fault. It sucked worse before they cleaned it.
    "The Threat of Internet Ignorance: ... we are witnessing the rise of an age of equestrian disinformation, one where a trusting public can graze on nonsense packaged to look like fact."-LRG-AF



  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jun. 4, 2001
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    4,245

    Default

    I have a Bissel pro heat select steam cleaner. It works really well at getting up dirt. I have light beige carpets and they still look new but I clean often. I do not use any of the cleaners as they cause build up. A professional carpet cleaning service told me this. For stains such as cat vomit I was told to boil water in the microwave, add a drop of dish washing soap and pour on the stain. Use a towel to take up the excess water. It works amazingly well. When the carpets finally go, we will put down hardwood. We have carpet only in the bedrooms and the living room. The rest of the house is tile.

    For tile floors I use my Bissel with a water/vinegar mixture. Again, this is what I was told to use and it does clean without doing damage to the grout.
    "Sometimes you just have to shut up and color."



  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jan. 9, 2003
    Location
    IN
    Posts
    4,226

    Default Hmmm...

    This may be a stupid question but, how is pergo for a bathroom?
    Whatever you can do, or dream you can, begin it. Boldness has genius, power, and magic in it. Goethe



  11. #31
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2001
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    18,539

    Default Installing hardwood floors

    Has anyone install their own hardwood? I ripped out my carpet--just too gross with dogs and cats and the dirt I bring home from the barn--and bought the wood. Quote to JUST install 2100 sq ft was 19k!!

    Checked out a bunch of sites online, watched several videos on youtube, and it doesn't look THAT hard--just takes some precision and a good set of tools? I'm fairly handy, but haven't attempted anything on THIS scale before!

    Am I crazy for thinking I can do this? Wood is prefinished 3/4" hickory. Would probably have the pros out to do the two sets of stairs (have unfinished hickory treads.)



  12. #32
    Join Date
    Jun. 22, 2008
    Location
    Outside Ocala FL - Horse Capital of the World
    Posts
    6,193

    Default

    Not sure about true hardwood, my husband just installed wood laminate flooring in parts of our house, it was a big job, first he had to rip out all the baseboards, and there has been a lot of measuring and cutting to get it down right. And yes, he had to get all the tools required to get them to lock together to eliminate gaps, etc.

    It looks great, but I find that my dogs are slipping and sliding a lot more than they did on the tiles, and this is starting to be an issue for our oldest dog.



  13. #33
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2001
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    18,539

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    Carpet and base is already up and out in most of the house--I pulled it all out myself, and it wasn't troublesome.

    I know my dogs will slide a bit on the wood. I ran across this product: Paw Pads and figured I'd give it a try if the dogs are having troubles.

    I also plan on putting down www.flor.com in a couple rooms. Carpet that you can pick up and wash in the sink! Sounds perfect!!



  14. #34
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2000
    Location
    El Paso, TX
    Posts
    14,261

    Default

    Real hardwood floors aren't really a first timers DIY project. I do a lot of remodeling on houses that my DH and I flip. Tiling, sheetrock, texture, concrete staining and minor electrical and plumbing. I won't do hardwood myself. The floor prep needs to be done well and it is too hard to fix mistakes. Now, wood Laminate, with a click/lock system is easy for a DIY project.



  15. #35
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2001
    Location
    Out for Lent
    Posts
    34,594

    Default

    tongue and groove?

    rent the best power equipment you can get, or invest in some pneumatic tools and compressor (handy around the farm anyhow) Hubby helped our neighbor to instal tonue and groove hardwood floor, had on of the cheapo nailer things, you had to strike with a big hammer. didn't work too well they ended up pre drilling each hole.


    it was a good size job, but very doable.
    Quote Originally Posted by Bristol Bay View Post
    Try setting your broomstick to fly at a lower altitude.
    GNU Terry Prachett



  16. #36
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2001
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    18,539

    Default

    Yes, tongue and groove.

    Was planning on buying air compressor, Bostich pneumatic nailer and a good miter saw. Will probably rent a brad nailer (to install baseboards), paint sprayer (to paint base) and tile saw (also planning on tiling a few small areas--probably less than 100 sq ft of tile work.)

    Jetsmom, what's so hard about leveling the floor and applying the underlayment? Doesn't seem like it would be that difficult. This house was built in 2000 and the subfloor is in good shape and it won't take much to prep it. The people I've spoken with in CO don't even feel a vapor barrier is necessary, due to our dry climate. I was thinking about using cork underneath.



  17. #37
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2001
    Location
    Out for Lent
    Posts
    34,594

    Default

    well, the neighbor put the wood down on the existing pine floor it had a 'nice' layer of something black on it, residue from the carpet that was on there.

    just don't start in the living room or dining room, work your way from a back room to the main part of the house. Oh, you will also need a saber saw/scroll saw to cut corners, and leave a good bit of space around the perimiter...I thin 1/2 of an inch?

    I am not an avid DIYer, but I have seen pretty much everything done to a house you can do. Wood flooring is really a matter of precision.

    Oh, and get GOOD knee pads, you'll spend a lot of times on the floor!
    Quote Originally Posted by Bristol Bay View Post
    Try setting your broomstick to fly at a lower altitude.
    GNU Terry Prachett



  18. #38
    Join Date
    Sep. 6, 2003
    Location
    WA, Land of the damp Thongpend
    Posts
    2,451

    Default

    Prefinished hardwood is easy, although not easy on the body if you are using a manual floor nailer. I did the dining room and living room in my house by myself. I did Bellawood which is prefinished oak (hard to nail through). I bought 10% extra for boo boos. I have 4 boxes left to start the kitchen with because I didn't make that many mistakes.

    First I painted the floor with Killz, then put down roofing felt as an underlayment, then had at it.

    If it is unfinshed wood I wouldn't attempt it. The finishing process is the big deal with that and you might have an issue getting someone to come finish what you put in.

    If you are going to do it all in one go or a relatively short period of time, rent a power floor nailer. I bought a manual one since I knew it was going to take me forever to get it done in my spare time.

    A couple of people I have known with no hardwood installtion experience, although good woodworking skills, have done intricate marketry with different flooring and patterns. It's not rocket science.

    My flooring is straight, and correct and looks lovely. Now to get the trim done. The biggest thing is to keep it square to the floor not the walls, walls tend to be wonky. I actually have one that has a pretty good bow in it but that is in the room I did a travertine floor in, not wood. That is also causing me to have issues hanging the new door. So it is not finished.

    I have three more rooms to do with hardwood downstairs, the kitchen, breakfast room and family room. The issue is I need to buy more flooring. I probably need another $5k worth. Which is not going to happen right now.



  19. #39
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2001
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    18,539

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    Yes, it's all prefinished. Yes, I'm planning on purchasing pneumatic nailer. Figure I can sell it after I'm done for a good amount. Compared to renting, purchasing is cheaper.

    I have read that hickory is a little tricky to install due to it's hardness. It is considerably harder than oak, for example.

    I'm not planning anything fancy. No changes of direction or patterns. Just want to get it in and not spend $19k on the install.



  20. #40
    Join Date
    Aug. 21, 2002
    Location
    WV
    Posts
    137

    Default

    My husband installed about 1600 sq. ft of hardwood floor in our home by himself. Looks great and is very easy to keep clean. He bought a pneumatic (sp?) hammer for less than $200 and it worked fine. Good luck!



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