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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May. 27, 2008
    Posts
    617

    Default Is Succeed really that wonderful?

    I have a horse who is prone to ulcers, and is treated w/ UG when the flare ups happen. He gets really spooky, can't focus, and is tense when the flare ups happen. The UG makes a huge difference-calm, ready to work, etc. I bag my supplements because liquids can be inconsistently given. Is Succeed all hype and enticing because BNRs use it, or is really worth the $$$ because it really works? Would U-Gard work as well? Horse hates powders. Pellets, granules are better choice. Let me hear from everyone, thanks.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2001
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    16,904

    Default

    I used the Succeed paste on Blush for a month and I'm not sure it did anything at all. It was palatable and she was happy to take it, though. IIRC, it was a little over $3/day.

    Were I in your shoes, I would look at ranitadine rather than OTC supplements.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb. 26, 2009
    Location
    Horse Capitol of the World
    Posts
    63

    Default Succeed

    We've used Suceed on a couple of horses in the barn and it made a huge difference in their management. They were both anxious and nervous, stall walker worry-warts. with the Succeed and some stall management both are now relaxed and happy, putting on weight. I think it's great on horses that need it. the Supplement obviously worked on them, but took about 5-6 weeks to show a difference.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2002
    Location
    West Coast of Michigan
    Posts
    36,321

    Default

    At the price they charge, I'd want a guarantee that it would make them poop gold nuggets and fart perfume. In my non-scientific recollection, I'd say about 3/5 of people say it's the Second Coming and 2/5 say they didn't notice a difference and wished they hadn't drank the Kool-Aid. That's sufficiently iffy for me to be well able to resist buying it.
    Click here before you buy.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    May. 27, 2008
    Posts
    617

    Default

    Thanks Deltawave, that's what I've heard from several people. I'd still like to hear from others if it's the second coming as far as supplements go! Does anyone know exactly what makes it so great?



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun. 28, 2003
    Location
    KY, USA
    Posts
    1,939

    Default

    We've had very good results with it on nervous, OTTB's.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2002
    Location
    West Coast of Michigan
    Posts
    36,321

    Default

    I'm not sure it actually IS "that great". Endorsement from a BNR means nothing to me as they are getting paid to use AND tout the stuff. It can't possibly cost that much to make, so my cynical self is forced to wonder if anyone would even try it (much less swear by it) if it cost $0.15 per day.
    Click here before you buy.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug. 28, 2004
    Posts
    1,806

    Default

    I know someone who looked into the ingredients in Succeed, and has pretty much made her own. She uses oat flour, chamomile flour, and slippery elm bark. The vet says it does the exact same thing, and it seems to have worked well for her.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2003
    Location
    VT
    Posts
    641

    Default

    Here's my Succeed story:
    My mare has always had a dull coat; loose, watery manure; stress about being ridden; was prone to pooping up to 10 times while being tacked up; and was also prone to complete meltdowns under saddle when asked to collect (balking, rearing, bucking, grabbing the bit and running, jumping up and down in place, etc...). I addressed all other possible pain issues and had also done the whole GG routine and did not notice any difference what-so-ever in her behavior. A few months later, I had her scoped because nothing had changed and I was at my wits end. She did not have any gastric ulcers, but my vet did the fecal blood test and she tested strongly positive for hind gut ulcers. We put her on Misoprostal and Succeed. Night and day difference!! I stopped the Misoprostal after about a month and have kept her on the Succeed. Her manure is now firmer, her coat is beautiful, she only poops 1 time during tack up and has not had one single meltdown since going on the Succeed. She can still be resistant at times, but no more of the "nobody's home" meltdowns that she used to do on a regular basis. She has been on the Succeed for about 1 1/2 years now and I don't dare to take her off it. I do believe that it has made enough of a difference that I am spending the money to keep her on it.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan. 20, 2004
    Location
    La Habra Heights, CA
    Posts
    1,476

    Default

    Didn't do anything for my horse. Had better luck with yogurt!
    --o0o--



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr. 1, 2005
    Location
    Georgetown, KY
    Posts
    2,597

    Default

    It worked beautifully for my ulcer-prone OTTB (after having treated him with omeprazole) in getting bloom on his coat and keeping the weight on. It also helped firm up his stools. After I weaned him off it (after 3 months), the poop got icky again. I've now got him on Smart Digest Ultra and LOVE it! The price is much, much more reasonable with many of the same ingredients.
    Proud supporter of SprotHorseRiders.com



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan. 10, 2006
    Location
    Clemson, SC
    Posts
    867

    Default

    I asked my vet about trying it for my VERY ulcer-prone horse who has been on stall rest/small paddock turnout since August. We suspect he has colonic ulcers (he's been on UG since the beginning and still showing ulcer symptoms). Vet had previously said to put him on a pound of psyllium a day (not fun to feed that!). When my horse stopped eating the metamucil I tried SandClear, and he stopped eating that as well. So I asked if Succeed would be worth a try. He said that it hasn't been shown to be as effective. Some people say it works, for others it doesn't. He told me that I could try it if I want, but he felt that I would be much better off if I could find a way to encourage my horse to eat the psyllium. So I am sticking with the psyllium, I have finally developed a concotion that my horse seems to eat.
    A lovely horse is always an experience.... It is an emotional experience of the kind that is spoiled by words. ~Beryl Markham



  13. #13
    Join Date
    May. 2, 2001
    Posts
    1,059

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KristiKGC View Post
    I asked my vet about trying it for my VERY ulcer-prone horse who has been on stall rest/small paddock turnout since August. We suspect he has colonic ulcers (he's been on UG since the beginning and still showing ulcer symptoms). Vet had previously said to put him on a pound of psyllium a day (not fun to feed that!). When my horse stopped eating the metamucil I tried SandClear, and he stopped eating that as well. So I asked if Succeed would be worth a try. He said that it hasn't been shown to be as effective. Some people say it works, for others it doesn't. He told me that I could try it if I want, but he felt that I would be much better off if I could find a way to encourage my horse to eat the psyllium. So I am sticking with the psyllium, I have finally developed a concotion that my horse seems to eat.
    What's the theory behind feeding psyllium to an ulcer-prone horse? Someone recently recommended this to me for our ulcery guy, and I couldn't quite figure out why.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2002
    Location
    Azle, Teh-has
    Posts
    7,773

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Coppers mom View Post
    I know someone who looked into the ingredients in Succeed, and has pretty much made her own. She uses oat flour, chamomile flour, and slippery elm bark. The vet says it does the exact same thing, and it seems to have worked well for her.
    I use Slippery Elm Bark by itself. It's 25 dollars a baggie (that's the price with shipping) which lasts me over a month.
    http://kaboomeventing.com/
    http://kaboomeventing.blogspot.com/
    Horses are amazing athletes and make no mistake -- they are the stars of the show!



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2002
    Location
    Azle, Teh-has
    Posts
    7,773

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FoxChaser View Post
    It worked beautifully for my ulcer-prone OTTB (after having treated him with omeprazole) in getting bloom on his coat and keeping the weight on. It also helped firm up his stools. After I weaned him off it (after 3 months), the poop got icky again. I've now got him on Smart Digest Ultra and LOVE it! The price is much, much more reasonable with many of the same ingredients.

    This is what I find with the Slippery Elm. Without it mine gets mooshy.
    http://kaboomeventing.com/
    http://kaboomeventing.blogspot.com/
    Horses are amazing athletes and make no mistake -- they are the stars of the show!



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jun. 28, 2003
    Location
    KY, USA
    Posts
    1,939

    Default

    These are very different problems. Succeed will not help sand colic (psyllium). Succeed will not cure all ills, INCLUDING ulcers; ulcers require very specific medical intervention. What Succeed will do, for many but not all horses, is facilitate digestion and weight gain when the rest of the program is correct for the specific horse.

    Is it a universal ameliorative?? Hell, no. Can it help in an overall program? Hell yes.

    And no, I don't work with nor am I in any way associated with Succeed.



  17. #17

    Default

    I'm using Lecithin as an ulcer preventative and it's been amazing. I have a thread about it on page 2. Not only has my horse been healthy since his ulcer bout, but the lecithin has done wonders for his barefoot hooves (they were always good but not are insanely healthy) and his tail is getting super thick. It's inexpensive, natural, and there are studies about it on the internet. We still do a 1/4 tube of Gastrogard for the shows, but it's nothing but pure Lecithin in his feed as an ulcer preventative.
    www.ZephyrsGarden.com Natural Care For Horses & Their Humans



  18. #18
    Join Date
    May. 27, 2008
    Posts
    617

    Default

    I read your posts on lecithin, I went to San Francisco herbs and saw how cheap it was. I'm beginning to think horse has hindgut ulcers. I just know I don't want to stay on UG forever. Vet is coming on Thursday, and I plan to ask about lecithin, Succeed, etc. I'm going to ask for CBC because the horse won't gain wt. Did your horse put on wt w/ lecithin? I saw he is 17hh also?



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jan. 10, 2006
    Location
    Clemson, SC
    Posts
    867

    Default

    I can't remember why he said the psyllium works on colonic ulcers, but he said that it isn't very effective to clear sand, but has shown to be reasonably effective on colonic ulcers, where the ulcergard can't reach.

    I had to feed a lb. a day for the first 10 days, then a lb. every other day, then 2x a week. He will stay on it twice a week until his stall rest is over; it seems to work pretty well to help him.
    A lovely horse is always an experience.... It is an emotional experience of the kind that is spoiled by words. ~Beryl Markham



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Apr. 4, 2008
    Posts
    301

    Default

    It did nothing for my horse Sunny.
    * Sunny * Ella (2006 filly) * Tank (2008 colt)*



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