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  1. #61
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    Jan. 12, 2004
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    Florida
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    Quote Originally Posted by enjoytheride View Post
    I think part leasing because you can't afford your horse on your own is stupid. You want to lease a horse out to make some extra money, help out a rider without a horse, or put some extra miles on your horse that's fine.

    If you can't afford to own your horse without someone paying half the bills you are in a dangerous position as soon as people stop leasing and you do not need to own a horse. If anything you should be the one doing the leasing.
    I live in a pricey area where many people do part-leases or leaseback their horse to the barn to use for lessons. I half-lease my trainer's horse, which has been working out well for over a year now. Our terms are in writing with a 30 day notice clause.

    That said, *I* personally would never buy a horse that I could only afford to board and keep if it was half-leased /leased back to the trainer for lessons. Too many variables - if you cannot afford to pay full care then you're at risk if bad luck intervenes and the lease ends.

    It's akin to my friends who have recently bought homes that were "great deals" contingent on being able to rent out their current condo or home. You're totally dependent on having a tenant, and if that goes wrong, you're strapped.
    "Horses give us the wings we lack"



  2. #62
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    Apr. 9, 2008
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    Pennsylvania
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    189

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    If I am reading this correctly, it sounds as though not only was the OP riding these horses, but was doing all of the barnwork associated with them too.

    I have no idea what the answer is to this dilemma, but it sounds to me like the woman who owned the horses had a pretty sweet deal going for her and it's a shame that (IMHO) she took (and is trying to further take) advantage of a 17-year-old.



  3. #63
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    Aug. 15, 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ambrey View Post
    Part-leasing out horses to be able to afford them is a very common way to be able to manage horses in expensive areas such as I live in. It might sound weird to you, but totally normal out here.

    As a consequence, the ability to part lease a horse- paying a fee for an agreed-upon right to ride rather than having to take on the responsibility of owning one- is also quite popular around here.

    It's a win-win situation when it works.
    Thanks, Ambrey, I had no idea!

    No matter where you live or what the cost of horse keeping is in a given area, if you can't afford your own animals and the bumps in the road that happen fiscally, then you should as someone else said, be a leaser or put the horse on the market.

    That's something I discuss with the clientele I have interested in buying. And I usually have them lease either one of mine or an appropriate mount for quite a while before we start looking. Especially during these tough times. If you can't afford to do it on your own, or you can't afford an unexpected vet bill or set back or even the basic monthly bills, then it's not a smart time to purchase. Sometimes it takes a stretch of having that monetary burden of a lease for people to realize that YES, it's something they can afford or NO, it's more than they bargained for either to the pocketbook or the hours in a day.

    I don't think that standard of responsibility has anything to do with how expensive your particular area is. Do you?



  4. #64
    Join Date
    Sep. 21, 2001
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    Parker, Colorado
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    2,657

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    Quote Originally Posted by enjoytheride View Post
    I think part leasing because you can't afford your horse on your own is stupid. You want to lease a horse out to make some extra money, help out a rider without a horse, or put some extra miles on your horse that's fine.

    If you can't afford to own your horse without someone paying half the bills you are in a dangerous position as soon as people stop leasing and you do not need to own a horse. If anything you should be the one doing the leasing.


    Seriously?!? HOW MANY posts have we seen here recently, especially with the economy in the toilet, recommending that financially-strapped horse owners consider leasing or part-leasing out their horses to help stretch their money? How many of us have done it? If this is "stupid", count me in the stupid category, but I have no regrets. I half-leased out my horse for 5 YEARS in order to be able to keep him. It was a wonderful situation.

    Sure, in a perfect world, we would all have secure jobs and large savings accounts and no surprises in life that ever affect our bottom line. And then there is reality.

    Imagine the post coming from the horse owner in the case: "I started leasing out my horses to a nice young girl when I lost my job, and now she is hurt and can't/won't pay me. My contract says she has to give me 30 days notice. Can I still enforce this contract while I find another lessee?"

    Obviously I am making some stuff up here, but how many of you would side with the owner in the above post? It's a sucky situation no matter how you look at it.
    where are we going, and why am I in this hand basket?



  5. #65
    Join Date
    Jun. 1, 2002
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    Indiana
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    I understand someone coming down on hard times and leasing out their horse until the world is right again. But selling that horse must always be in the front of their mind because as soon as the lease stops they are out of luck again. You walk the line there and it could go either way very quickly. It can work out as in your situation or you can fail to find someone to lease and end up selling your horse. Yes, I think it is *stupid* to purchase a horse with the intention of leasing it so you can afford it.

    I feel the same way about people that purchase a home they can't afford because they are counting on people to rent a room or the basement. Increasing the money you have each month is a good idea, but being dependent on that to make your mortage is irresponsible. Then they are in forclosure when the people move out.

    If the owner came on this BB and said that? I'd say that I'm real sorry she's having hard times, but you can't make a rock bleed and if she doesn't find a lease real quick she should consider selling or other options. Notice that in this situation it is "can't" pay. Obviously the OP would have ended the lease with a notice under the usual circumstances. Since she has no income of her own then perhaps she can discuss making small payments or an IOU until she gets back on her feet.



  6. #66
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    Apr. 25, 2008
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    To the OP, sorry about your situation. You sound like you had the best of intentions. Am I correct in that the horses reside on her property? She was taking care of all expenses before you came along?

    To those of you lecturing the OP to the tune of "you signed it, so suck it up", did you even read her original post or were you so busy interjecting your own personal stories that you failed to see what she said here:
    I guess I'd just like to warn anyone who is paying to ride someone's horses to not sign a contract until you have taken it away and had it checked out- however nice someone seems!
    Looks like she's warning others to heed her advice, hard learned that it was. So, save the preaching.



  7. #67
    Join Date
    Nov. 9, 2005
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    uk
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    Quote Originally Posted by Long Spot View Post
    Thanks, Ambrey, I had no idea!

    No matter where you live or what the cost of horse keeping is in a given area, if you can't afford your own animals and the bumps in the road that happen fiscally, then you should as someone else said, be a leaser or put the horse on the market.

    That's something I discuss with the clientele I have interested in buying. And I usually have them lease either one of mine or an appropriate mount for quite a while before we start looking. Especially during these tough times. If you can't afford to do it on your own, or you can't afford an unexpected vet bill or set back or even the basic monthly bills, then it's not a smart time to purchase. Sometimes it takes a stretch of having that monetary burden of a lease for people to realize that YES, it's something they can afford or NO, it's more than they bargained for either to the pocketbook or the hours in a day.

    I don't think that standard of responsibility has anything to do with how expensive your particular area is. Do you?






    if they lived in an expensive area round me there horse would be expensive and in full livery and not leased out as one could afford it as they areliving in an expensive area
    or they own there neds and do them there selves as in most joe bloggs in uk
    or they get top notch bods on to ride top notch neds as they ahve to dosh and then go watch them at international events -
    i can say that here near me is an expenisve area and we all own more than 2 neds



  8. #68
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    Mar. 23, 2005
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    Portland, Oregon
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    Quote Originally Posted by enjoytheride View Post
    Yes, I think it is *stupid* to purchase a horse with the intention of leasing it so you can afford it.
    I can agree with that. I'm not even sure why someone would WANT to purchase a horse just so they could lease it out (when I buy a horse it's for ME to enjoy!); I've never known anyone who has done so, but I don't doubt they are out there.
    Proud member of the EDRF



  9. #69
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    Sep. 6, 2007
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    San Diego
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    if they lived in an expensive area round me there horse would be expensive and in full livery and not leased out as one could afford it as they areliving in an expensive area
    GSL I thought I was the only one who noticed this and had a private laugh. I actually live in the same expensive area referenced, Southern California. Expensive, nice horses are rarely leased out. An expensive, nice horse is usually one who is in training for competition. If you plan to compete, considering the huge expense that is, you're definitely not going to have be leasing. The two just don't go together. It's just apples and oranges.

    I can agree with that. I'm not even sure why someone would WANT to purchase a horse just so they could lease it out (when I buy a horse it's for ME to enjoy!); I've never known anyone who has done so, but I don't doubt they are out there.
    They also may be completely new to the whole boarding experience though and get in way over their heads. Maybe they didn't intend to lease, but now they're stuck. Because they're novices, they didn't realize the hidden costs, like vet bills, changes in feeding, horse has to be in training, etc. Maybe horses should come with a warning: May look cute, but is actually hiding many expenses. I can honestly say if my father had a premonition about how much horse would cost him over the years, I think he would have actively steered me to other sports.



  10. #70
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    Sep. 29, 2007
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    585

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kementari View Post
    What happens if your standard, every day owner loses THEIR job? Lemme tell ya, in this economy, that's a real possibility for many of us. Should I get rid of my horses because if I were unemployed I couldn't afford them long-term?
    If you're the owner of the horses, and you're ultimately responsible for living within your means (and it sounds like the OP's owner was living beyond her means), then yes, you have to sell them or find a situation where you can afford them without depending on other people, (i.e. bare bones rough board somewhere), because you really can't depend on other people who are probably in the same boat you are and can hardly afford to support themselves without a job, let alone support your horses.



  11. #71
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    Jul. 27, 2007
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    Behind the Orange Curtain
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    To stick with the OP, my point wasn't the right or wrong of part-leasing horses, but that it's a common and generally accepted way to get help with the costs Like it or no, lots of people do it.

    I see a lot of high horses being pulled out here, and I think it's unfortunate- I've seen some people get hit with some seriously hard times recently and it's hard to see Our barn used to have a lot of empty stalls because of the number of people who could no longer afford to keep their horses there- now a local has started up a rescue and those empty stalls are being filled with horses whose owners weren't able to find a way to care for them. Rather than falling over ourselves to incriminate other horse owners, maybe we should be sticking together in these hard times.

    I hope the OP was able to find some resolution. Her advice to not sign a contract without really understanding the implications was right on- it actually brought a question to mind. OP, are you over 18? I know there are many minors that post here, and I hope they know that they can not be held to a contract (I don't think, the lawyers would know more).



  12. #72
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    Aug. 13, 2008
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    OP, sorry about what happened to you! That's awful for you to lose your job, then be in an accident, and then have the owner be so mean, but....if you signed a contract that says you pay, you basically have to.

    I haven't come across mean people yet! I leased an OTTB(the owner should have been paying me though since I put most of the training on the horse....) and it ended up slipping its stifle and injuring something in its back. Since I only did a month-to-month lease I stopped the lease, even though I still hand walked the horse, groomed her, etc. I always make sure in any lease contracts that I do, that it says I'm not responisble for an vet bills since I know if something did happen, there's no way in heck I could pay for it!

    I was going to pay the owner of the horse I'm training now, to ride him whenever I wanted, but then my dad lost his job and I had to start helping the family pay bills. I told the owner that I was sorry I couldn't end up leasing the horse but if she ever needed me to ride him anyways for free, I would gladly do it. She told me she understood these hard times and now I ride the horse whenever I want, for free, and I can take him to shows later in the year if I want to and she'll haul fo free!

    I'm a horse crazy teen and will ride basically any horse or pony, but I'm not stupid when it comes to contracts and such, since I have to pay for everything and my parents won't. So if I was liable for vet bills of a leased horse, I'd be in deep water!



  13. #73
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    Sep. 6, 2007
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    San Diego
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    Quote Originally Posted by AiryFairy View Post
    If you're the owner of the horses, and you're ultimately responsible for living within your means (and it sounds like the OP's owner was living beyond her means), then yes, you have to sell them or find a situation where you can afford them without depending on other people, (i.e. bare bones rough board somewhere), because you really can't depend on other people who are probably in the same boat you are and can hardly afford to support themselves without a job, let alone support your horses.
    Yes, exactly! When I was fresh out of college, I knew I couldn't totally afford a horse, so I leased, for a long while. The owner had time issues not money issues. It's the irresponsible people that I take issue with. The ones who buy cheap horses, thinking they are getting a deal, but not considering the long term expense. People who need to lease to meet their board really shouldn't own. If you have to depend on another to pay your board, how on earth can you handle the out of the ordinary expenses? It's a situation that's caused so many problems with our country today. I want it now, even though I can't really afford it. Instant gratification.



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