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  1. #81
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    Feb. 23, 2008
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    Can I ask the advice from those who trailer frequently, how can one safely inspect the horses in different kinds of trailers without unloading them?

    I don't trailer often, and don't have my own trailer, but I have witnessed a woman getting her leg broken in 10 places when she got into a trailer with her horse, who was fussing about something.

    When I shipped one of my horses in a four horse slant load last year, you couldn't really get to the horse farthest in without unloading the other three. In a two horse straight load you can usually look in the front and look in the back, and that covers the whole of both horses pretty well.

    Even so, I wouldn't want to step into the stalls with the horses in such cramped conditions, especially if they were fussing or stomping around.

    I'd love to file away a good technique for future reference! What are safe and good ways to check on the horses when they are in various trailers?



  2. #82
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    Oct. 2, 2007
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    I think that is a very good question.
    "What are safe ways to check in various trailers"

    First you have to buy a trailer that facilitates that. My 2 horse straight had full size escape doors with windows on both sides and also a 5 piece tail gate, so that the entire interior could be viewed without actually going into the trailer. My 3 horses slant has feed windows on one side and viewing/ventilation windows on the other, good dividers and a 2 piece rear door that one side can be opened on, so again the entire interior can be viewed without entering the trailer. It also saved us when we had to tranq a horse in the trailer and could easily reach his neck from the escape door.

    Thomas suggested in trailer remote cameras and they are alternately much more boring than expected/a very good thing. Of course, get a trailer equipped with that wonderful new invention, electric interior lights, and make sure they work before you carry passengers...sigh.

    I jump out in stop and go traffic or at red lights to check them- people honk, so what? I am as quick as possible- run back there and do a quick check, and run back to the cab, and travel in the far right hand lane.

    Can I add that I've had two bad wrecks with horses in my straight load. My gelding got stung on his sheath by a wasp in his stall and kicked the sh*t out of the double steel walls-but they held and he was sore, but not hurt after. My mare got frantic one time and tried to climb out the little manger window, jumping over the chest bar and taking out the front widnow and steel manger with her thrashing. This happened just after we had parked, so I was able to quickly release the chest bar from the safety of the escape door. I've also had horses step on each other's coronets in a side by side straight haul, which cannot happen in a slant, at least not easily. At least once I've had a horse just lay down in a straight haul...and got back up when we stopped to see what the noise was. He was just tired! But he couldn't have done in it is a secure stall slant. No design of trailer is fool proof.
    Last edited by CatOnLap; Mar. 16, 2009 at 11:44 AM.
    "The Threat of Internet Ignorance: ... we are witnessing the rise of an age of equestrian disinformation, one where a trusting public can graze on nonsense packaged to look like fact."-LRG-AF



  3. #83
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    Jun. 21, 2008
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    Stuff happens. My area of expertise is software. Even today , on very rare occasion, I will make a rookie/newbie mistake. I just made one a few weeks ago-the statements of all our customers went out with wrong interest rates

    That doesn't make me an absolute good for nothing fool. I am human. Somedays I have a ton of stuff to do, somedays my personal life may be in turmoil. Now me being proffessional involves putting all that aside and focussing on the task at hand and putting everything I have into it 100% . But I may do software, I am not controlled by software. So if once in a blue moon, something happens, my management is ok with it-they account for the fact that it will happen. If I do it often enough-maybe a warning and if I don't shape up, a termination. Too risky to have folks who can't focus.

    What I have found helps when I do such newbie/rookie mistakes is to accept it right away. Yikes! my dumb mistake-sorry and I will work overtime to fix it .Where some of my colleagues have gotten in trouble, is they try to hide their role and blame someonelse. Ultimately it will come out and you will have egg on your face and not to speak of the time wasted trying to figure out where it went wrong and how to fix it.

    Now with horses, it is not just software that can be corrected, it is lives at stake. A horse could be injured or killed and so can a human. So the stakes are higher. But I still think if you are a human being-someday, just someday you might commit a stupid mistake yourself .

    With all the revisions I am not even sure what happened. I don't know the OP or the horses. So I don't know if the trailer was rattling for three hours and they had their ipod on and were listening to music totally oblivious. I don't know what happened. But if she did miss something and it was a mistake on her part-if it were me-I wouldn't post on a BB and I would say sorry my bad-Thank God my mare survived and make sure I never ever do something like that again. If that was the approach taken in the original post, I doubt we would have this much commotion.



  4. #84
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    Sep. 9, 2008
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    323

    Default Camera in Trailer?

    I have a 3 horse slant and have never had any trouble with the horses biting at each other but I did have a horse fall in the trailer.

    I knew immediately because I have a monitor screen in the truck and I saw the horse fall. We pulled over right away, unloaded the horses and tended to the mare. We re-loaded her in the back slot so she would have more room to spread her legs.

    I have had a camera/monitor for several years and I cannot imagine hauling without one.

    They are only about $500 (sometimes less). I have seen them advertised in the Dover Catalogue. I had mine installed by a stereo place. They did a great job and I haul *practically* worry-free because of my camera/monitor.

    Just a thought ...

    SCM1959
    Last edited by SCM1959; Mar. 16, 2009 at 11:46 AM. Reason: grammar!



  5. #85
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    For those of you who haul with cameras, what type of camera do you use and how did you rig it up?



  6. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by grayarabpony View Post
    For those of you who haul with cameras, what type of camera do you use and how did you rig it up?
    My husband bought me one for a birthday. I believe he got the camera from Nothern Tool. I can look later (truck and trailer not here now), but it is a small camera that is mounted up high in my 2 horse. It is about the size of a small tangerine. It is a wired camera and the wire goes from the horse area thru the tack room (husband drilled holes in trailer) and thru the truck bed and into the extended cab window (we shut the window tight and it doesn't affect the wire). The TV screen is mounted on the hump between the driver and passenger and is really easy to visualize without taking your eyes off the road for long.

    I LOVE my camera.



  7. #87
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    Thank you Edgewood.



  8. #88
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    Quote Originally Posted by twofatponies View Post
    Can I ask the advice from those who trailer frequently, how can one safely inspect the horses in different kinds of trailers without unloading them?

    I don't trailer often, and don't have my own trailer, but I have witnessed a woman getting her leg broken in 10 places when she got into a trailer with her horse, who was fussing about something.

    When I shipped one of my horses in a four horse slant load last year, you couldn't really get to the horse farthest in without unloading the other three. In a two horse straight load you can usually look in the front and look in the back, and that covers the whole of both horses pretty well.

    Even so, I wouldn't want to step into the stalls with the horses in such cramped conditions, especially if they were fussing or stomping around.

    I'd love to file away a good technique for future reference! What are safe and good ways to check on the horses when they are in various trailers?
    I did post earlier but much briefer.

    So for those who are genuinely needing to figure out how:

    Good lighting inside.

    Grooms door appropriately positioned. I actually have a groom's door, then a side ramp and then a rear ramp.

    Then I've also got windows I can climb up to by dropping side panels and then see into.

    With mine, if there's absolute chaos happening inside, no matter where it is I just enter the appropriate door or ramp and can see and manage the horse. (My truck is a herringbone load - that's what we call "slant loaders" over here.)

    And then finally cctv. They're dead cheap to buy nowadays and come with instructions to fit. You can just buy ones for household security and with a tiny little tv screen and up to 4 little cameras to site wherever you want them. I have a couple low down looking up and a couple looking up.

    I would emphasise though that transporting a horse starts with purpose designed transportation. And the priority must be the horse. Too often folks are looking for trailers that suit their car or with fancy accommodation. To me it's all about the horse and that means good non slip flooring. Substantial partitions that are moveable and packs them in so they're snug but allows them to balance and use their head and neck to so do. Good ventilation and safe and easy access.

    By coincidence I've posted a little more on herringbone transportation and the sort of design I'd have and why I'd always choose it and showing a photo over on this thread:

    http://www.chronicleforums.com/Forum....php?p=3950930

    Nowadays when transporting you must also always ensure that horses are adequately booted and suited and you just have to take care and manage things whether you're going 3 or 30 or 300 miles. You have to be prepared and with a Plan B in case you break down or get stuck in traffic.

    Last year alone I took charge of 7 memorable horses that had been damaged by their journeys and it's probably that sort of personal experience that makes me more mindful of the consequences of not effectively managing transportation. I've even started mailing out advice to folks that come here for equestrian holidays because sadly for horses, what I always thought was basic knowledge seems to be high level education.

    Seems that common sense isn't so common though.

    If you google cctv security systems you'll find what I mean.
    Last edited by Thomas_1; Mar. 16, 2009 at 02:54 PM.



  9. #89
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    Nov. 9, 2005
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    uk
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    i tow with a trialer so lets start there
    1st you have to have the correct type of vechile if you going to pull a tralier
    here we have rules as to type
    look here http://www.ntta.co.uk/law/

    and also if one past its test after 1997 then one needs to take a trailer test
    if one pasted its test before 1997 then thy can drive upto 3.5ton
    poeple that are older can go to 7.5ton, after that then you have to have hgv licenses
    i can drive up to 7.5ton
    anyways
    to expand on what thomas has said ,
    horse trialers a re designed from pony to full
    double check that the trialer is the right length size and width for your horses

    a horse will not go in if the trialer is to small,
    for exsample rice do all sorts of trialers

    http://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&sou...NSzjAfirL2vCA&
    usg=AFQjCNF8O0SsuExHLxRwDg6BgSTDfiK7hA&sig2=twKcgG ySLktPYygK096Q6w

    for exsample the rice europa is designed fo 2 light weight horses ie up to 16hhs
    its not made for horses above that as the head room isnt there nor is the lenght nor width

    as bigger horses need more head room so you must have 7ft 6inches or more
    and at least afoot or so longer

    www.iforwillaims.co.uk is another well know make and agian 505 is for smaller horses the 510 rnage is for bigger ones

    always check in the garage when buying a tow vechile you tell them you are pulling a horse box not a not a box trialer as they would think you talking about a camping trialer not a horse trialer
    average weight for ours is about 750k, add weight of horses can soon go up to 2.5ton
    your car must be the correct weight and engine to pull and tow too small its dangerous both for you and the horses

    always check the floor brakes light tyres to include the spare tyre and any cables also check underneath check your jockey wheel
    alos the coupling and fittings and fixtures are all in good working order
    most trialers have inside light which can be on when travelling at night
    always park a trialer with a a jockey wheel on something like a block off solid wood
    like scaffoldling board or decent flat stone so its easier to hitch and dont sink into mud
    try to park it up on hard ground like concrete rather than grass etc as damp rises and can destory the floor from underneath so its important you check under it just as much as inside the trialer

    its helpful to have individual front brest bars and breaching straps and that the partition can be moved so its easier and more inviting for a horse to load
    place hay in small haynet so horse can munch helps him to settle easier
    tie the horse to the correct length for size of horse going in
    if a shetland you can tie lower and place a bale of straw in front of him
    to act as breast bar so pony has the room but not enough enough to get him self into trouble with
    having a decent size grooms door is always good as again you can open the door and again more light comes in and again is inviting for the horse to go up and on same to if you have a front unloader can open top of the door above the front ramp
    always have a front unload if you can as thus allows the horses to come off easier via the front and also you have 2 exits rather than one

    grease your coupling or hitich or bull joint its easier to htich and unhitch
    keep a plastic bag over it in bad weather or turn it sideways if you have a trialer lock in the hitch
    then have a pot of axle grease and smear round your bull joint
    every week check if stood still and not going anywhere
    check your drain holes inside arnt bunged up and fitting dont squeak add bit of axle grease
    if they do, ie around where the ramp joins the trailer thus makes for a quiet ramps check the springs of the ramps and the fittings of the doors

    also check when you have a ramp that theres no gap between ramp and box
    if there is then usually 2x4 the width of the ramp has to be carried
    thus saves your horse if he puts his foot in the wrong place you have covered that potential fault of the trialer and save your horse from a nasty injury
    plus dont forget to take it out when you close the ramp up
    this is normal commonsense thing to do for front loading ramps and can keep it
    right at the front of the trialer under the window when in transit or not in use

    check the partitions from top to bottom
    that either bolt in or click or are telescopic that they work and are in good repair
    and keep all holes clean nothing worse than having a moving partition
    when in transit all becuase its bunged up with pooh so clean the holes and hear the click or bolt go in and test it locked in the correct place be fore the off



    check your trialer every time you use it , clean it out everytime you use it
    old pee and pooh rots the floor in trialers or horse boxes so clean them out as soon as you get home
    never ever ever clean them out on a show ground thats dis respectful

    when driivng think----- dont brake so sharp-as you would in a car say on own
    the horse will crash into the brest bar and makes for uncomfy journy so when horse nexts goes in he will only think of pain rather than a nice ride

    if you aprroaching lights corners or round a bouts then slow down and take corners slightly wider and before lights as you know when they are going to change then slow down dont just stop
    always have the bigger horse away from the camber side - here they load if a two striaght up on right and smaller one on left so i assume it would be right for you
    rug up boot up and tail or poll guard your horse
    obvously rugs are either fleece or coolers depending on weather or anti sweet rugs
    protect your horse check partitions are full lenght should have rubber skirts and padded
    walls should be padded and rubber mating

    and never tie directly to the ring fitting inside always use a bit of baling twine and tie the horse to that both inside or out with either a trailer tie or lead rope with a quick release knot
    and thus you add your haynet directly to the ring fitment

    always carry extra haynets for each horse on back of ramp i normally do it in middle asno plate and lights are further down so dit on the middle standing bar at back of trailer
    so he has enough to last him all day plus carry plenty of water i use 5 gallon drums

    also dont rush - rushing makes mistakes so plan your journey well and have a back up route
    if congested make sure your radio is on traffic and that it works each area has a bulliitin newsflash of traffic hold ups make sure you have route c or a map handy or sat nav if in doubt
    plan well and be as safe as you can but dont rush get most ready the night before so when you arrive you give your self time to get settled and the horses and have enough time to collect your no.s
    or whatever
    chekc your vechile before the off for water oil and fuel and keep the pot of axle grease in door or smoewhere handy and remeber to check your air on all tyres plus spares plus a jack for both or at least a scissor jack
    Last edited by goeslikestink; Mar. 16, 2009 at 07:06 PM.



  10. #90
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    Mar. 10, 2006
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    Albany NY
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    Duplicate, sorry
    Airborne? Oh. Yes, he can take a joke. Once. After that, the joke's on you.



  11. #91
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    Quote Originally Posted by fourh mom View Post
    This is a natural phenomenon occurring on all bb's. It's hard to live with, but seems to be just one of those things.


    Yep, yep.
    Although, this does raise a good point... you hear stumping/stamping/stomping coming from the trailer, you get out to check, things quieten... well then. You just stay right there if the traffic situation allows it. I would even go so far as to walk alongside the trailer for as long as I could - taking into consideration the traffic conditions. That way the stu/sta/sto-mping (and its root cause) ceases, at least for the time being. When you are back under way and no longer playing trailer monitor, Mr. Teeth and his counter parts will hopefully be otherwise engaged. sylvia
    That's just silly. There's no reason to be hypervigilent about stomping around if you check on them and everythings is alright. The concern is have their wraps come loose, are they kicking, have they taken down a structural part of the trailers, is a partition loose, is a tie too lose, has someone turned around, if they don't have sheets or blankets, is someone being bitten, are their wounds, if not, they are only stomping around, but there are far too many reasons for stomping which need to be checked on, frequently, to say it went on for three hours and you didn't check, come to find out the mare was dripping sweat, including a drenched tail. Its fine if you check and nothing is amiss. why do you care if they stop when you open the door, when you stop the trailer, what does that little tidbit of info mean, nothing. You only need to ascertain if they injured themselves or took apart their shipping wear or the trailer or are after another horse. YOU DON"T HAVE TO WALK ALONG THE SIDE OF THE TRAILER TO CATCH THEM IN THE ACT!!! You only have to make sure they weren't hurting another horse. In this case, if the OP had entered the trailer (her original post said she never checked) bent down to look at legs, leaned over to look at sides, peered into the rear to look at tales (is one caught on something) shortened the lead ropes, come on, do I have to spell it out? This is my point, can't you people figure this kind of safety check out for yourselves? What do you do when your horses are acting up, cross your fingers and giggle, Gee, I hope they are all in one piece when we get there!!!!

    Sneer if you like, be purposefully obtuse all you want, bash people for objecting the the OP's standards of trailering, it still is apparent that I have higher standards than the folks here who think like the teenager who feels I and the majority of others on this thread are "too harsh".
    Airborne? Oh. Yes, he can take a joke. Once. After that, the joke's on you.



  12. #92
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    Oooh, now here's a thought. I always trailer my horses in at least a sheet for protection against a breez or what ever. what if you included putting a sheet on your horse as a pre-hauling check? The mare wouldn't have been bitten up with a sheet on. In winter. For a long haul. Maybe a blanket would have been nice, depending on the temp. I still wouldn't haul even in sweltering temps without a sheet, because it is protective against sweat, traveling wind, snags on the trailer, falling against the divider, and now, bites.
    Airborne? Oh. Yes, he can take a joke. Once. After that, the joke's on you.



  13. #93
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    Jul. 23, 2008
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    Default CCTV question

    Quick question about the CCTV idea.... I have never used one, but I'm going to assume that the video display is visible to the driver.
    Now that it's illegal to use cell phones in so many cities due to the dangers of distracted driving, wouldnt that affect the use of driver-visible moniters? I'm sure that it's illegal in most, if not all, states to have the dvd-tvs directed to the driver (obviously... how stupid could drivers get?)... how are the CCTVs any different?



  14. #94
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    Gee, I *think* it would have been possible to advise the OP not to blame the slant load, but instead to check the length of tie and the horses without all of the foaming at the mouth.



  15. #95
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    GAP, have you been reading this thread since the beginning, before all the edits? that would explain why so many got so exercised over the incident.



  16. #96
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    A horse can quite easily nip through a sheet. Besides, there is a school of thought that disagrees with trailering with rugs on. GAP - I do agree, there is a lot of foaming at the mouth as you so aptly put it, let alone mean spiritedness going on here! Ah well, some perfect people like to preach.



  17. #97
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    Quote Originally Posted by amm2cd View Post
    Quick question about the CCTV idea.... I have never used one, but I'm going to assume that the video display is visible to the driver.
    Now that it's illegal to use cell phones in so many cities due to the dangers of distracted driving, wouldnt that affect the use of driver-visible moniters? I'm sure that it's illegal in most, if not all, states to have the dvd-tvs directed to the driver (obviously... how stupid could drivers get?)... how are the CCTVs any different?
    OK so I'm in the UK where legislation is going to be different.

    But we have had law preventing use of mobile phones without proper hand free kits for years now.

    Likewise it's an offence to do antying that means you drive without due care and attention.

    However I wasn't (nowone was!) suggesting you stick a blooming great tv set smack in front of you and watch that all the time as you drive along!!!!

    What you actually get is a tiny little itsy bitsy screen that sets on to the dashboard. No different to say a GPS navigation system screen.

    If you're not driving with a passenger and find such stuff distracting because you're the sort of person that can't walk and chew gum at the same time, then just turn it on from time to time or when you hear stomping!!



  18. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by Foxtrot's View Post
    A horse can quite easily nip through a sheet. Besides, there is a school of thought that disagrees with trailering with rugs on.
    I personally don't always transport with rugs on. Rather it depends on the weather and whether it's appropriate according to the condition of the horse.

    Indeed one of the "memorable" horses I posted about earlier that arrived at my place in poor state had been transported in a trailer with it's rug on. It was an overweight big black cob and standing next to a huge 18 hand clydesdale (alias a ton of radiating heat!!) both wearing rugs! In August! And I don't mean sweat rugs! Think quilted duvet! (and I know that isn't what the earlier poster meant when saying about putting rugs on!) This one had no boots though! because the owner thought it would be too hot and they also might slip off!!! It came off the trailer in a state of semi-collapse with sweat pouring from under it's rug which was half rubbed off because it didn't fit properly and as if a running hosepipe had been stuck up there and with cuts to both it's hind legs.

    I do agree, there is a lot of foaming at the mouth as you so aptly put it, let alone mean spiritedness going on here! Ah well, some perfect people like to preach.
    Is it you that's "foaming at the mouth" with your expression of outrage at the postings?

    I'm also clearly not reading studiously enough because neither have I seen any signs of perfect people.

    Rather my opinion is that there's folks who are willing to offer appeasement and placating support for a lack of owner responsibility and those who criticise those types and just point out what I always took to be common sense and basic knowledge.

    I've always said that I don't mind educating the ignorant but I don't particularly enjoy or see it as my role to tangle with the terminally stupid and those set on being irresponsible and ignorant for life.

    I am gob-smacked at some who seem to be in the latter category and their apparent willingness to keep expressing and demonstrating their apparant inability to work out or understand how important it is to effectively and practically manage horse transportation so the horse doesn't arrive at the other end spoilt or ruined!

    I wouldn't say I was frothing at the mouth though more a sort of "rolling eyes, here we go again smiley" just like this

    I'm out of here now though as those who genuinely want to know about transportation have probably got all they need. The OP (with luck) might have learnt a lesson from her mistakes. That's only going to leave those intent on terminally stupidity and defending the right to so be!



  19. #99
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    IMO the "safest" trailer is the head to head design. You can get into the trailer and inspect, feed and water every horse any time you need to without risk to yourself. You can unload any horse at any time as well.

    I've done a lot of long distance hauling in just about every kind of trailer and the head to head is hands down, the best for the horses.

    We had a trailer dealership for years and actually had one of the first slant loads to roll off the assembly line. At first I thought "what a great idea", until I made a few trips with it. The horses consistently became sore behind from "sitting" on the partitions and after two different mares who were both experienced shippers, threw hissy, kicking fits, I knew this design wasn't so good.

    I have never had a horse get in trouble in the head to head design and since we are a breeding farm, much of our hauling is young inexperienced horses. The "kids" learn to load and haul confidently and we've yet to have one not want to get on the trailer.

    Like I said, JMO
    Last edited by NoDQhere; Mar. 17, 2009 at 10:18 AM. Reason: oops....spelling



  20. #100
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    Quote Originally Posted by brightwhitestockings View Post
    [edit]


    I am beginning to feel like this board consists of mainly crabby [peaple] that think they know freaking everything about horses and GOD FORBID a mistake be admitted then the person who made it must be chided and scolded relentlessly. It is a bit riddiculous.

    & you guys complain about us teenagers?!?!?!?! seriously, GROW UP.

    to the OP: jingling for your mare and sorry everyone is being so snotty to you.
    How true -



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