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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug. 14, 2004
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    Default moving my tractor?

    so i need to move my tractor to my new place...... what is the "standard" method of tractor transport?

    can i just throw it in a horse trailer? or?

    eta: it is a compact JD 2320 with removable front loader and a box blade that can be detached too.
    Last edited by mbm; Mar. 13, 2009 at 11:38 AM.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    May. 17, 2003
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    Default

    Depends how big and heavy it is--bear in mind you might wreck the ramp, even if it is a teensy tractor.

    An equipment rental place will have a suitable flatbed trailer they can rent you, which might be less traumatic and cheaper than the potential repairs to the horse trailer.



  3. #3
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    Nov. 16, 2000
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    Concord, NH
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    You must have a small tractor! Mine won't fit in my horse trailer.

    I'd be careful though even if it did - find out out how much it weighs - are your tires loaded?

    We need to move ours this spring and plan to have the car-towing/wrecking company come and use their BIG truck. They say they do it all the time. But our tractor probably weighs 3 tons.



  4. #4
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    May. 12, 2000
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    NE TN, USA
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    How big is your tractor, and how far do you want to move it?

    If it's a big tractor, ask any of the wrecker/transport companies about a "rollback" transporter.
    “There are two ways to conquer and enslave a nation. One is by the sword. The other is by debt.”
    John Adams



  5. #5
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    sorry! it is a compact tractor - so it is small.... i know it is only 4' wide - and probably doenst weight that much.....

    it is a JD 2320



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2006
    Location
    The rocky part of KY
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    Default

    I know a 2320 is pretty small and around here if you could fit it in the horse trailer they would and just tootle on down the road and let the chips fall where they may.
    Equipment hauling trailers, dovetails and flatbeds can be rented from say, A1. Where you are the wineries create a market for equipment to support the crush so if you call around you should be able to find stuff.

    For long distance travel we had our tractor and all the implements moved on a low-boy to the closest EZ tractor trailer turnaround which was the freeway offramp 5 miles from home, drove the tractor home carting one or two implements and borrowed a flatbed equipment hauler from a local contractor, along with his kid who drove the tractor while DH towed the hauler with the rest of the implements. So if you are moving a short enough distance you might consider driving the tractor on the surface streets - just get the "slow moving equipment" sign for the back of it. Also if you have a paving/excavating type contractor you are on good terms with and business is slow for him you might consider paying him to transport with his truck and trailer. Can't hurt to ask.
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
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  7. #7
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    Aug. 14, 2004
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    Default

    i thought about driving it.... it is 7 miles the short, thru town, busy street way and 9 the longer , country road way..... but i would have to drive it on the highway.... and i am not sure what the protocol for that is....

    how long would it take to drive it 9 miles? i am not sure what the top speed is... (going to go look it up)

    eta i cant find the specs for speed, but if it went 20 miles per hr at the transport gear then it would only take a half hour to get to our new home..... how fun! i will truly be a country girl if i am out driving my tractor on the road



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov. 6, 2002
    Location
    Henrico, NC 36 30'50.49" N 77 50'17.47" W
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    It's not very heavy. http://www.deere.com/specsapp/Custom...HO&pNbr=0150LV

    I'd crib up under the ramp for loading and unloading. If you have any worry about damaging the trailer you may be able to get someone with a rollback to move it for 50 or 75 bucks since you don't have to move it very far.



  9. #9
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    Jun. 28, 2003
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    KY, USA
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    Default

    7 miles? Drive the damned thing.



  10. #10
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    May. 12, 2000
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    It's listed as 1700 pounds, so a 2-horse trailer should handle it. You'll probably have to back it against an embankment to load it, though.

    Unless the roads are heavily travelled, high-speed, or lots of blind spots, driving the 9 miles should be no problem -- depending on local laws. Make sure you have the slow-moving vehicle triangle on the back if you take that route.
    “There are two ways to conquer and enslave a nation. One is by the sword. The other is by debt.”
    John Adams



  11. #11
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    Aug. 11, 2003
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    Flatbed trailer and remember to put on the tractor brake - and chain it down....if you don't want to drive it.



  12. #12
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    Jul. 30, 2005
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    England
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    I would drive it. Ditto the warning signs, and pull over when you can to let traffic pass.
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  13. #13
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    Apr. 6, 2006
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    Plainview, MN
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    I vote for renting a flatbed trailer form the rental place. It will have ramps that can handle a vehicle and they should be able to set you up with chains for securing it.



  14. #14
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    k, i am going to drive it

    what are the "standard" tractor driving protocols?

    do i drive on the far right (bike lane) or do i stay in the lane like a regular car?

    there is one major intersection where i will have to make a left turn. this is a 4 lane highway to a 4 lane highway (2 lanes each direction) with a light , so if i am driving on the right shoulder i will have to go across 2 lanes of traffic to get into the left turn lane, make the turn and then toodle off to the right hand shoulder again across 2 lanes....

    that is the only "sticky" part.... do i have it sussed right? is that how to do it like i am a bike?

    (sorry, never driven tractor on the roads before!)



  15. #15
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    Nov. 2, 2001
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    you are a motorized vehicle, you should drive as such. Speed/size matters little. You should stay out of the bike lane, maybe only to let folks pass, and left turns are no different than doing them with a car, yield to oncoming traffic.

    It should take you every bit of an hour to get to your destination.

    Still, using a trailer could help you move other stuff, not just the tractor.
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  16. #16
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    Apr. 8, 2005
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    Kentucky
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    Quote Originally Posted by mbm View Post
    k, i am going to drive it

    what are the "standard" tractor driving protocols?

    do i drive on the far right (bike lane) or do i stay in the lane like a regular car?
    We drive tractors on the road fairly regularly. Pick a time of day that there is as little traffic as possible so you don't annoy too many people. Drive it in the right lane like a car, make sure you have a SMV sign on it and use flashers if you've got them. If you get a line of cars behind you, pull over as soon as you can to let them by.

    If your tractor has a decent "road gear" like ours do, it should only take about a half hour. It's really not a huge deal. Around here it's not unusual to encounter combines on the road- during harvest season if you come upon a pickup coming your way slowly with flashers on, you find the nearest driveway to pull into to let him and the combine following by!
    Last edited by shakeytails; Mar. 14, 2009 at 08:43 PM.



  17. #17
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    Feb. 28, 2006
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    Sunday morning at daybreak is the quietest time to drive. Obviously not on Easter Sunday. You'll have less headache if you can go then.
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
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