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  1. #21
    Join Date
    May. 31, 2007
    Location
    Aiken, SC
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    4,696

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by spacehorse View Post
    A big thanks to all who defended my statement.
    Just wait. . . . . . . .4. . 3.. . 2. . . .1. . . .



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Aug. 22, 2005
    Posts
    3,788

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cielo Azure View Post
    Glad to see another santimonious A**hole!

    As someone who breeds, raises and trains horses, i can tell you clearly don't "get" it. Ya know, someone has to take that green horse (to traffic) and ride it in traffic for the first time. Horses don't become traffic safe without some real work (that includes lots of prep work). But eventually, there has to be a first time. Clearly, you like to buy en broke and then brag about how you only take those with brakes out on the road. Well...you know what, that means someone else had to test those brakes and train those brakes cause it sure the h**l wasn't you, was it!
    Actually, sweetie, I haven't had a horse I didn't train myself since I was in junior high. Raised most of them myself as well.

    If all that "real work" and "lots of prep work" you crow about is done right, there is no reason for the horse to be a braking hazard on the road the "first time" or any other time. Especially if you've gone to any trouble at all to make "brains" part of your selection critieria for any horse you straddle.

    OTOH, if you want to take addlebrained idiot horses and go traipsing all over the roads without bothering to get them broke half-decent first and expect motorists to anticipate your difficulties and accomodate your lack of control, then I guess you'd expect to run into some trouble sooner or later.

    My working premise is that every driver on the road will be oblivious/ignorant/rude/or otherwise detrimental to my safey on horseback. Therefore, any horse I take on the road has better be near-100% controlable both laterally and longitudinally. Anything less and we stay on rarely traveled routes and deep in the ditches until the horse can be relied upon to keep his wits about him. (On my "road broke" horses, I ride along the dirt shoulder just off the pavement except for getting down in the ditch when something like a semi, belly-dump, or other
    big machinery goes by in the lane next to us.)



  3. #23
    Join Date
    May. 8, 2004
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    6,872

    Default

    FH knows this story. I was riding my pretty much packer mare on a tiny dirt road. I hacked her there just about every day for a year. A car was creeping by me at about 15 miles an hour. A bunch of dogs were suddenly released from their house and came running over to the fence we were walking next to, jumped up on the fence and began barking. My horse spooked - just a little spook, really, and not at all something that I felt was dangerous or untoward.

    But, her rear end ran into the car.

    I don't believe you can train every little spook out of a horse. Nor can you predict every little thing that will happen. My horse was pretty bomb proof, but she impacted with a car because we were in the exact wrong place at the exact wrong time. Shit happens.

    You want that to never happen, stay in an indoor.



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jun. 10, 2001
    Location
    nj
    Posts
    8,811

    Default greysandbays

    you ever hear that saying "never say never"? your turn will come girl.
    my mare "never" spooks either. she didn't spook when that SUV flew past us and nearly clipped us with the sideview mirror. nor when the box truck zoomed by too close for comfort or when the idiot driver honked his horn to waive to us... but the other day she did spook b/c a flag on a flag pole we've ridden by a thousand times was fluttering loudly
    i can probably count all her serious spooks on my fingers but sometimes it does happen. these are animals. even computers have glitches and we are talking about live wired flight animals. the absolute terms you use and your arrogance bespeak of your inexperience.
    http://www.eponashoe.com/
    TQ(Trail Queen) \"Learn How to Ride or Move Over!!\" Clique



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Aug. 22, 2005
    Posts
    3,788

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    Quote Originally Posted by marta View Post
    you ever hear that saying "never say never"? your turn will come girl.
    my mare "never" spooks either. she didn't spook when that SUV flew past us and nearly clipped us with the sideview mirror. nor when the box truck zoomed by too close for comfort or when the idiot driver honked his horn to waive to us... but the other day she did spook b/c a flag on a flag pole we've ridden by a thousand times was fluttering loudly
    i can probably count all her serious spooks on my fingers but sometimes it does happen. these are animals. even computers have glitches and we are talking about live wired flight animals. the absolute terms you use and your arrogance bespeak of your inexperience.
    No, honey, the "absolute terms" I use were born of experience. Luckily for me, part of that experience only consisted of getting baptized in ditch water instead of splattering all over the grill of an oncoming truck. If you can't keep your damn horse under control with at least 99% accuracy, stay off the damn roads. Otherwise don't be surprised if you/your horse become a hood ornament.

    I'm not sure where you got the notion that "under control" means "no spook ever". It means getting a leg on a horse and/or saying "WHOA!" the very instant you feel that first hint of spook reflex. (If you are too dim to feel those first hints or your horse doesn't have a reliable "WHOA!", for sure you shouldn't be on any road or trail outside your own fenced yard!)It means minimizing putting your horse between Really Spooky Things and oncoming traffic. It means taking precautions about getting out of the way of probable spook-inducing traffic (even if you think you are entitled to the right of way). It means not daydreaming or lollygagging around or getting so zoned in on your training/conditioning objectives that you become oblivious.



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Nov. 18, 2004
    Location
    Catonsville, MD
    Posts
    6,966

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    greysandbays, it has to be very comforting to live in a world of perfect absolutes. Over here in messy and imperfect world, where random crap does happen, it's not nearly so orderly and predictable. Well trained horses do things we don't expect, cars disobey signs and signals, and rules of the road are flouted continually. Amazing, huh?

    Folks like you require the world to be orderly and absolute so that you can apportion blame according to your worldview without having to spend time contemplating any untidy or uncooperative facts. Again, a big timesaver for you.

    FH, so glad you and the horse were ok. I wish there were some way to change the mental habits of drivers, who increasingly behave as if driving is the only way to get around and cars are the only vehicles on the road and anything that slows down their desired rate of travel can just take their chances. But I don't see that happening. And this general disregard for sharing the road doesn't just impact equestrians, but also walkers, bikers, folks w/ dogs.

    Every time I drive in the Amish areas of PA, my heart is in my mouth the whole time. I see cars crowd the carriages and push them to go faster than they should, passing too close, making even experienced-looking horses look like a nervous wreck. It's just terrifying. And driving politely would cost them all so little.
    I tolerate all kinds of animal idiosyncrasies.
    I've found that I don't tolerate people idiosyncrasies as well. - Casey09




  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jun. 5, 2007
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    1,190

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    Quote Originally Posted by marta View Post
    i started carrying the whip too. saw my gf doing it. i had an idea of tying a flag at the tip of it but your idea of wrapping reflective tape on it sounds even better. i'm going to do that. thanks

    couple of years ago someone gave me ankle boots with reflective tape on them. i put them on my mare when we ride the roads. every bit helps and if nothing else, i can point to all the steps i undertook to protect myself and make us more visible in court when we get sued...
    Great! It really does work wonders at getting motorists attention. I've also thought of hanging a sign off my whip that says "PASS WIDE". Might take away some of the interpretation of what I'm asking the motorist to do when I carry my whip across three quarters of their lane of traffic.

    You should see us in our "road gear". We look like we're going off to war....



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Oct. 18, 2000
    Posts
    22,489

    Default

    I just read this thread.

    First, I am so glad that you and your horse were not seriously injured. It must have been a terrifying incident.

    Second, it doesn't matter if one is a pedestrian, on a bicycle, motorcycle,or riding a horse. Motorists have to share the fu**ing road with other users. (excuse the language but this is a pet peeve of mine)

    Where I live there are plenty of motorists passing through that don't slow down, yield or show any common sense around slow moving vehicles. No manners - no attempt at being polite. Nix. Nada.

    We have to cross or use roads out foxhunting, and I'm astonished at the number of people who WILL NOT slow down even if we're motioning them to slow down or attempting to warn them of danger.

    And I swear that if I see one more citiot yakking on their cell phone and trying to pass me on the right when I'm trying to make a right turn with my rig I may just completely and totally lose my marbles. ARGH!!!!!!!!!

    Glad you are ok. Glad your horse is ok. Glad you won. Very very glad.

    Be well.



  9. #29
    Join Date
    Nov. 18, 2004
    Location
    Catonsville, MD
    Posts
    6,966

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    Agree 100%, JSwan.

    Bottom line, though, I don't think ANYTHING will change unless there is a way for law enforcement to identify, ticket, and prosecute the universe of behaviors that are easily identified as 'refusal to share the road'. If offenses against the idea of sharing the road caused expensive tickets, more costly insurance premiums, or even LOSS of insurance, then there would be a reason for drivers to pay attention. But how do we get drivers' attention? As things stand, what incentives are there for drivers to be more careful, attentive, and thoughtful?

    Those behaviors are hard to describe in legal terms. Passing too close? What is too close? Crowding non-motorized traffic? What, EXACTLY, does that mean? It would be very hard to enforce a law against being a selfish driver. Aggressive driving rules are mainly couched in terms of doing things that increase the risk of accidents between cars, aren't they?

    I don't know what the answer is.
    I tolerate all kinds of animal idiosyncrasies.
    I've found that I don't tolerate people idiosyncrasies as well. - Casey09




  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jun. 10, 2001
    Location
    nj
    Posts
    8,811

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    Quote Originally Posted by Daatje View Post

    You should see us in our "road gear". We look like we're going off to war....
    i believe you. my sister says that my horse looks like a war pony when we come back from riding on the roads. i like the pass wide sign even better. gotta get my artistic SO involved so he can make it look good and clear.
    http://www.eponashoe.com/
    TQ(Trail Queen) \"Learn How to Ride or Move Over!!\" Clique



  11. #31
    Join Date
    Dec. 11, 2002
    Location
    US
    Posts
    3,060

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    The idiot van owner SHOULD have sued his IDIOT brother that hit you!

    And there should be no appeals in this sort of case.
    I\'m not crazy. I\'m just a little unwell.



  12. #32
    Join Date
    Jul. 24, 2008
    Posts
    1,102

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    I almost was hit by car while riding my mare. I was a young teen and thought it would be fun to ride to the quick stop along a busy road. Well it was getting dark so I thought I should pick up the pace to get home so I started trotting, some cows at a dairy got a little excited which spooked my horse and we ended up in the middle of the road staring right at a van Thank God my legion of angels were on duty becuase they had seen me and had slowed way down It ended up being one of the trainers at my barn! I got the biggest tounge lashing ever! I had ridden this mare everywhere and around everything she knew what cows were. Horses are just unpredictable, as soon as we act like they are predictable that's when we end up hurt.

    Dawn



  13. #33
    Join Date
    Dec. 7, 2008
    Posts
    161

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    Glad to hear you are both okay! Good luck in the upcoming show and I can't wait to hear your story! Funny how it's never the drivers fault.... "the horse appeared out of nowhere" Ha.



  14. #34
    Join Date
    Mar. 31, 2006
    Posts
    282

    Default

    I am so glad that you and your horse are OK. And how lucky you were for your judge. The only thing that I can add is that I find it curious that the idiot comes out to the country for his Christmas tree, yet can't drive like he is in the country.
    I am too frightened to ride along the road anymore. We moved out here 10 years ago, used to hack along the roads, even took the kids and ponies - no more. I won't even take a walk with my leashed dogs. People are in too much of a hurry to have any common courtesy.



  15. #35
    Join Date
    Nov. 16, 2004
    Location
    Bucks County, PA
    Posts
    527

    Default ha-ha I'm a media hound

    They kinda jumped the gun on this, I thought they would wait til after I went to the township meeting...

    http://www.phillyburbs.com/news/loca...58e9a983ee4d2d

    Now I heard I have to wait 30 days for an appeal, rats, I am bursting to tell you some stuff!
    Someone asked about the lawyer. My homeowners insurance, State Farm, paid for it all.



  16. #36
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2006
    Location
    MI
    Posts
    11,704

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    I had a friend whose horse suffered fatal injuries after being struck by a delivery truck. The two gals were riding down a dirt road near their home (normally very quiet area) on two seasoned horses. The ditch wasn't really a ditch--just some tile and then steep berms with barbed wire fence.

    Not sure what the driver was doing other than just not paying attention, but he came around a curve and slammed into the back of them. They had no where to go and little warning as he flew around the corner.

    I moved my horses about 3 weeks ago to a new farm. Sunday I planned to go out for a road ride but first, I drove around my intended route trying to ascertain things like "do I have an escape route?" "what kind of spooky stuff is out here?" "how busy is this road?"

    We had a nice ride but still ran into some obliviots--even though it's a rural area, lots of farms and I saw at least 10 other horse/rider combos out on the various dirt roads in the area.

    Bridges, RR track crossings, areas with spooky stuff on one side, lack of safe ditch to bail into, etc...all make me nervous when it comes to cars/trucks....

    I was nearly hit on a one lane bridge a couple of years ago in much the same way. Again...on a steady eddy...I looked and listened for traffic before starting across the bridge. But as I was half way across a car came zooming over the hill probably going 50+ on a 35mph road behind me. I turned and MADE EYE CONTACT WITH HER as I kicked my mare up a notch so I know she saw me, but she was showing no signs of slowing down and zoomed on by with only a few feet between us as I bailed off the bridge and into a ditch.

    In this area, it seems like motorists are not respectful of pedestrians, cyclists, motorcycles or anything else sharing the road. My old roommate was big into cycling and when she first moved here, she wanted to ride her bike to work. I told her to drive the route a few times first--that I didn't think it was safe.

    She was here doing a rotation for PT at a rehab center for brain injuries. First day on the job EVERY SINGLE PATIENT had been struck by a car while cycling or on a motorcycle. She never did bike to work.

    I think more than just horses, we need to educate motorists about sharing the road and giving people a wide berth. Shoot, even on a bicycle, you can have a tire blow out or hit a hole and veer into traffic. When cars won't give you more than a few inches, your margin of safety goes down dramatically.

    Ramble ramble. Anyway...hope things turn out well. Can't wait to hear "the rest of the story."
    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

    Might be a reason, never an excuse...



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