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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2002
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    2,215

    Default I am a warmblood! I have good bloodlines! I am pretty!

    I was, however, not meant to do trails.
    So said my 6 year old trakehner Rico today :P


    I took him out today-last day before the weather is supposed to turn to crap, and I was getting sick of riding in the arena. So first time he's been out since November. But we have SO much snow on the ground still, that I knew it was going to be deep and slushy, and would probably give him a work out in and by itself.
    Rico on trails is a harrowing experience. First of all, he hasn't had much experience out on them, but he also has a Chicken Little Symptom where he's sure that the sky is falling. He turns into a stereotypical Trakehner-hot and spooky; the antithesis of what he generally is like in the arena. So I opted to invite my friend's horse (and my friend I suppose, but really, I just wanted her horse ), C. C is a HUGE 17.3hh paint crossed with something gelding, who is almost bomb proof on trails. So climbed on Rico, went around to the side of the barn where, he took a look at the wide unknown, spun around and tried to book it back to the barn.
    After THAT conversation (I say conversation, because it really was. He's not the type of horse that I can argue with. Instead I have to try to cajole him) and C coming back to get us, gave us a look of absolute disgust, in which Rico hung his head in shame, we managed to get on to the racetrack.

    The snow is still about 8-9" deep, so does right to their knees. C, my soulmate of a horse, was plodding along, looking for grass. Rico, God love him (because sometimes no one else does ) was doing a cross of passaging and "must fling myself as far forward as I can!" and going "GOD! It's snow! I hate getting my hooves wet! EWWWW!" and trying to lift his legs as high as humanly possible. As a side note, if a horse moved undersaddle like they did in deep snow, the sport of dressage would likely be obliverated, because NO ONE could absorb that shock and hard movement from a large animal! :P LOL But about 15 minutes into it, my horse finally succumbed (to exhaustion) and started taking HUGE steps at the walk, deep and lifting his back. Was such an amazing experience because he was fully through and engaged (and not trying to jump over every snow drift, which I think was novel)

    All was going well until we started nearing the barn. Where Rico thought it would be brilliant to try to bolt for home (after all, this was a traumatic experience for his small brain. Snow, you know, should never be walked through if one can avoid it). He shot forward so quickly that I lost control. There's nothing else in the world that I hate more than when you feel you have no connection to the horse's mouth, where they just completely evade the bit. I think its the control freak in me. Anyways, he shot forward, ran into C, who got surprised, and they bothran up the hill. Our only saving grace was the deep snow, and my friend managed to get control of her horse. My Special Kid however, tripped. Typical of His Grace. He then starting piaffing. Obviously without any intention from me whatsoever, and likely incorrectly, but piaffing none the less. And snorting. Let's not forget the snorting, as it disturbed the miniature horses greatly We ended up piaffing and snorting almost 5 whole minutes before he would settle down enough to walk on a loose rein.

    Came back to the barn, he was hot all over (damn traumatizing walking in snow!), but what really made me happy is that he was really foaming at the mouth and so sensitive to my hands. Rico does foam when I get to his back and get him lifting his back, but usually only a little bit at a time, because I don't think he's ever TRULY through with me all the time (although I'm working on it!). This time though, his back was so engaged and aside from the spooking and hotness, he felt amazing in between times. Now if I could just get this without having to go through a freaking zomg-snow-i-hate-trail-rides-does-that-horse-want-to-eat-me ride before hand...

    Here's The Big Grey Beast himself:
    http://kayla.horse-corner.com/enrique/RicoStanding3.JPG
    (with his lovely mangled ear. It adds character I tell you!)

    Overall though, it was a lovely day! :P
    In my opinion, a horse is the animal to have. 1300 pounds of raw muscle, power, grace, and sweat between your legs - it's something you just can't get from a pet hamster.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar. 9, 2006
    Location
    IL
    Posts
    2,556

    Default

    He sounds special and I mean it in the nicest way possible

    First time it snowed my newly imported Irish ponies nearly had heart attacks (never seen snow before) - they were doing the hot-foot across the snow and snorting at falling snowflakes.

    Then they realized it wouldn't eat them and took off bucking and farting.
    *The Quietman ~ Irish Approved Gr.1 Stallion
    www.windyislesfarms.com
    Like Us on Facebook



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan. 9, 2003
    Location
    IN
    Posts
    4,229

    Default cute

    Very cute story. I could picture his reactions as I could visualize my Trakehners as you were telling it. (Although 2 of my 3 Trakehners are good trail horses and the third has just been started under saddle)
    Whatever you can do, or dream you can, begin it. Boldness has genius, power, and magic in it. Goethe



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2002
    Location
    Canada
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    2,215

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Sassenach View Post
    He sounds special and I mean it in the nicest way possible

    First time it snowed my newly imported Irish ponies nearly had heart attacks (never seen snow before) - they were doing the hot-foot across the snow and snorting at falling snowflakes.

    Then they realized it wouldn't eat them and took off bucking and farting.
    haha, that's just cute. we had a TB come down from arizona that about had a heart attack as she stepped off the trailer and saw the snow...

    my guy is living proof that horses are only scared of two things: things that move and things that don't :P
    In my opinion, a horse is the animal to have. 1300 pounds of raw muscle, power, grace, and sweat between your legs - it's something you just can't get from a pet hamster.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun. 21, 2004
    Location
    Central Florida
    Posts
    4,261

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TropicalStorm View Post
    my guy is living proof that horses are only scared of two things: things that move and things that don't :P

    now, that is funny hahahah
    *^*^*^
    Himmlische Traumpferde
    "Wenn Du denkst es geht nicht mehr, kommt von irgendwo ein kleines Licht daher"



  6. #6
    Join Date
    May. 12, 2008
    Posts
    4,458

    Default

    a former boarder bought a beautiful quarter for her daughter. This horse has tons of points and championships in the quarter horse show ring as well as the hunter ring. He had great manners, great movement, could do a lovely jog as well as trot.....

    Mom got an invitation to go to the local rodeo and help some team penning friends. She loaded up the lovely quarter horse and headed off.....

    ....turns out cows were not a part of this guy's life and meeting them for the first time at a rodeo is not the best idea. He wouldn't get near them, wouldn't have anything to do with them! Needless to say, that team did not win the day.

    Oh, well - good thing he was bought as a show horse, not a rodeo horse.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov. 3, 2003
    Posts
    1,690

    Default

    My warmbloods do NOT get their feet wet! They tell me that they are genetically unable to and I am an idiot for asking.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2002
    Location
    Canada
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by imissvixen View Post
    My warmbloods do NOT get their feet wet! They tell me that they are genetically unable to and I am an idiot for asking.
    well duh. it would mess up the pretty pedicure they've got going on!
    have to say though that because of that, the first thing I did when I got my first foal is put on my muck boots, find the deepest pudlle and MARCH him through it repeatedly.
    It's quite cute now, because, leading the horses, my big trakehner will try to leap over the puddles (and snow drifts, apparently ) . my little 16hh holsteiner merrily splashes his way through :P
    In my opinion, a horse is the animal to have. 1300 pounds of raw muscle, power, grace, and sweat between your legs - it's something you just can't get from a pet hamster.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul. 21, 1999
    Location
    Houston, Texas
    Posts
    11,621

    Default

    Don't you know warmblood feet dissolve in water? At least that's what mine tell me.
    "I don't want to sound like a broken record here, but why is it that a woman will forgive homicidal behavior in a horse, yet be highly critical of a man for leaving the toilet seat up?" Dave Barry



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar. 26, 2005
    Location
    Back to Normal.. or as close as I'll ever get
    Posts
    10,265

    Default Not just WBs

    When I first got my TB - Vernon - as a 7yo ex-pony horse, he had no idea that trails were for relaxation.
    To him they represented the World's Longest Turf Track & Post Parade.
    So we'd jig on the way out, jig all along the way & jig the whole way back. If we made it that far....

    I spent nearly the whole first year I had him waving B'bye to friends as they headed out to the trails while I headed back to the ring to play
    So? You Wanna Run? with him.

    After he finally figured out it is (sorta) safe out there he'd have Winter Amnesia and come Spring we'd have to review the whole process.

    Water? You wanna discuss crossing water?
    Picture Vernon sailing over my head, held by a leading rein, clearing an 8' wide ditch that held maybe a foot of water.
    He felt it was safer to jump than come down the gentle incline, walk into the water and walk back out.
    *friend of bar.ka*RIP all my lovely boys, gone too soon:
    Steppin' Out 1988-2004
    Hey Vern! 1982-2009
    Cash's Bay Threat 1994-2009



  11. #11
    Join Date
    May. 1, 2006
    Location
    Tampa, FL
    Posts
    578

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Portia View Post
    Don't you know warmblood feet dissolve in water? At least that's what mine tell me.
    Yes they do & you must protect yourself from those horse eating puddles
    Also, the sky really is falling
    Please don't ask my horse about meeting the pig that lives on the farm. He reminds me on a daily basis, that it is not allowed to move while we are riding.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun. 17, 2007
    Posts
    455

    Default

    I was totally LOLing reading this because I swear sometimes, the 1/2 TB in my Trak/TB is completely blotted out by the 1/2 Trakehner. He does the dumbest things sometimes! And, he is the SAME way on trails!
    Equus Doth Indeed Makeus Brokeus. Or Brokeus Meus -- when you have a baby warmblood, it could be either one!



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar. 19, 2008
    Posts
    1,980

    Default

    Not a warmblood, but I worked with an ex-steeplechase TB that had issues with white ground poles. They were apparently terrifying (and yet natural wood ones were fine as long as they weren't painted). I was working at a school stable at the time, and to get to our upper field you had to go past the baseball diamond. The first time I rode him up there he WOULD. NOT. CROSS. THE. FOUL. LINE! That was painted on the grass! At least we were riding with the jumping team and he had about 10 others to lead him over it, so we eventually jumped it. Oh, and this happened at the beginning of baseball practice so we had an audience. For the year he was at that barn I don't think we ever just stepped over the line--he always jumped it!



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb. 22, 2005
    Location
    Where the prairie ends and the mountains begin
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    2,797

    Default

    What a great story! I could practically visualize his reactions.

    I feel your pain, I have a Saddlebred mare.

    She is however the Alpha on the trail and the first to go through water, trees, brush... pretty much anything. But she might be doing it at a jig, or a piaffe...
    Dreaming in Color



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jul. 31, 2007
    Posts
    16,623

    Default My horse, the DOT engineer

    When he was young, my smart, self-preserving DWB (read; the most cart-horsey of the warmbloods) had to stop at every water crossing, unpack all his surveying equipment and start taking measurements.

    You could wait patiently. He was calm because he was occupied doing really complex math.

    You could say "enough is enough!-- You aren't really afraid. You could kick him, even "over under" him with the reins. He'd say "You are distracting me from my calculations. The more you carry on, the longer my study will take."

    When he was done, having satisfied himself of the water's safety, he'd walk through without another thought.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Dec. 14, 2005
    Location
    Just east of Short Hill Mtn.
    Posts
    2,699

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mvp View Post
    When he was young, my smart, self-preserving DWB (read; the most cart-horsey of the warmbloods) had to stop at every water crossing, unpack all his surveying equipment and start taking measurements.

    You could wait patiently. He was calm because he was occupied doing really complex math.

    You could say "enough is enough!-- You aren't really afraid. You could kick him, even "over under" him with the reins. He'd say "You are distracting me from my calculations. The more you carry on, the longer my study will take."

    When he was done, having satisfied himself of the water's safety, he'd walk through without another thought.
    This just made me laugh out loud at work and attract undo attention! The first horse I leased when I became a re-rider used to do the exact same thing! Now I know why!
    "Our greatest glory is not in never falling, but in rising every time we fall." - Confucious
    <>< I.I.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jul. 31, 2007
    Posts
    16,623

    Default From a brain the size of your fist...

    Yeah. All kinds of equations solved by that horse.

    He also belongs to a strong, well-organized union that has a really detailed contract outlining the exact duties and limits of "management" (me) and "labor" (him).

    Ask for too much, and you'll find this horse quoting some obscure bit of fine print explaining exactly why you are out of line. But then isn't management always trying to screw labor? He knows all about that.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Apr. 19, 2004
    Posts
    327

    Default

    This reminds me of a story about my now 2 y.o. filly. We live in the great white North and the very first snow happened at night, while mom and filly were tucked in the warm and cozy barn. There must have been about 6 in. of the white stuff on the ground.
    So I put halters on, and figure filly will follow mom out (we were 2 to turn out that day). Sure enough mom strides right out, she's feeling good after a night in. Filly looks outside and just puts the brakes on all fours!

    She.was.not.going.out.in.that.WHITE.COLD.stuff.

    We took mom away, figuring that she would follow eventually. Nope. Feet still planted in cement. We tried bribing her with treats. No way. We tried pushing her in the butt. Still planted.
    We eventually took 2 lunge lines behing her lovely butt and pushed her out that way. Keep in mind that mom is screaming her head off, yelling at her daughter to stop making a fuss!!!
    Filly actually jumped into the snow.
    Then she walked to the paddock as if nothing happened.

    She does have a mind of her own, that one! Good thing she's never won!



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2002
    Location
    Canada
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    2,215

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mvp View Post
    When he was young, my smart, self-preserving DWB (read; the most cart-horsey of the warmbloods) had to stop at every water crossing, unpack all his surveying equipment and start taking measurements.

    You could wait patiently. He was calm because he was occupied doing really complex math.

    You could say "enough is enough!-- You aren't really afraid. You could kick him, even "over under" him with the reins. He'd say "You are distracting me from my calculations. The more you carry on, the longer my study will take."

    When he was done, having satisfied himself of the water's safety, he'd walk through without another thought.
    haha, that's just hilarious!
    someone should do a spin off of "if your horse had a career, what would it be?"
    In my opinion, a horse is the animal to have. 1300 pounds of raw muscle, power, grace, and sweat between your legs - it's something you just can't get from a pet hamster.



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