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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul. 11, 2007
    Location
    MA
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    1,299

    Question Has anyone used round pen panels as stall walls?

    Just curious.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2003
    Location
    Shenandoah Valley, VA
    Posts
    1,356

    Default

    ooh! I'm curious too. I have been thinking of using one or 2 as a divider in a larger, 12x36 stall. I have seen them set up as portable stalls before.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar. 21, 2005
    Location
    michigan
    Posts
    2,453

    Default

    Yup. Use them for temporary stalls all of the time. Why?
    Lapeer ... a small drinking town with a farming problem.
    Proud Closet Canterer!



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep. 17, 2003
    Location
    Fort Myers, Florida
    Posts
    2,667

    Default

    My friend used them along with post...raised them up a bit and made two paddocks for her stallions.

    I'm sure they could be used for a stall underneath a roof.
    "My treasures do not sparkle or glitter, they shine in the sunlight and nicker to me in the night"



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul. 5, 2006
    Location
    Frederick, MD. Canada originally!
    Posts
    2,497

    Default

    I have panel stalls in the barn where we are currently. We're building another facility and it didn't make sense to put a lot of $$ into stalls for here. I have panel stalls inside a coverall barn.

    Most of my horses actually prefer panel stalls, tons of airflow, they can see everything and be in contact with their neighbours.
    True North Dressage
    Select Cheval Canadiens for dressage and eventing
    www.TrueNorthDressage.com



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb. 14, 2003
    Location
    Windward Farm, Washougal, WA- our work in progress, our money pit, our home!
    Posts
    6,759

    Default

    My third stall is a "temp" stall made from two corral panels. I used it for a weanling/yearling stall. I used plywood to make the bottom 2 feet solid (drilled holes in wood, wired it to corral rail) to keep little horse feet in, and dogs out. The same concept can be used to create solid walls if neighbors don't get along.

    I use corral panels for all sorts of things--temp small pens for rehabbing horses, as gates between paddocks or fields where no gate posts exist, that sort of thing.
    Proud member of the "Don't rush to kill wildlife" clique!



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct. 3, 2002
    Location
    it's not the edge of the earth, but you can see it from here
    Posts
    12,079

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    I have panel stalls. I LOVE THEM. I can set/reset any number of combinations for stall size/arrangements.

    For foaling I use tarp and/or boards along the bottom, along with banking.

    My dream 36 x 36 barn will still have pipe stalls.
    Most of my horses actually prefer panel stalls, tons of airflow, they can see everything and be in contact with their neighbours.
    InnisFailte Pinto Sporthorses & Coloured Cobs
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Bits are like cats, what's one more? (Petstorejunkie)



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct. 12, 2005
    Location
    Issaquah, WA
    Posts
    669

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    We have them in the never-got-finished arena stalls. They were put up in a rush when a clinic came in, then didn't come down as other things have taken priority. They are totally functional, but I would caution putting horses next to each other that may kick. This is my only fear. That, and the wind blows shavings around as the back wall is not built down to the ground yet.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr. 24, 2003
    Location
    kennebunk Maine USA
    Posts
    469

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    yup, while my barn was being built i set up 12 foot panels to make stalls in a large garage for about 6 6 months. worked great and when all was said and done i also ended up with enough to make a round pen



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul. 11, 2007
    Location
    MA
    Posts
    1,299

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by costco_muffins View Post
    They are totally functional, but I would caution putting horses next to each other that may kick. This is my only fear.
    This is my big concern. My quarter horse kicks and my tb DOES NOT TAKE SUBTLE HINTS. I am hoping that if I do ever need to do this, I can make sure that my qh's food is far away. This is really the only big issue. The other concern I have is my tb gets his legs stuck in fences when rolling. Even when paddocks are huge, if the best place to roll is right near the fence (which they tend to be nice and deep there), he will find that place. Two separate staple emergencies later, I have become cautious. I guess I could always just nail a plank to the wall like someone else mentioned. Thanks!! I love this board.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2005
    Location
    Upper Midwest
    Posts
    5,667

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    My horse kicks (once kicked through the 2" stall wall at a show...I'm sure the owner of the horse on the other side LOVED him) and at the new place has panels for his stall walls. It is fine because he still has the (brick ha ha) wall he can kick and then the panels are on the other three sides.

    I just worry about a horse getting cast and not having a wall to push against. Maybe I worry too much...



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr. 24, 2003
    Location
    kennebunk Maine USA
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    469

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    Quote Originally Posted by 2boys View Post
    This is my big concern. My quarter horse kicks and my tb DOES NOT TAKE SUBTLE HINTS. I am hoping that if I do ever need to do this, I can make sure that my qh's food is far away. This is really the only big issue. The other concern I have is my tb gets his legs stuck in fences when rolling. Even when paddocks are huge, if the best place to roll is right near the fence (which they tend to be nice and deep there), he will find that place. Two separate staple emergencies later, I have become cautious. I guess I could always just nail a plank to the wall like someone else mentioned. Thanks!! I love this board.
    i attached plywood to a few of the panels with U brackets. to keep the horses from wall outlets they could also be used to surround the stall so a horse doesnt get stuck in a panel.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar. 14, 2004
    Location
    Left coast, left wing, left field
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    6,092

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    Well, I don't know if I'd call what we have "round pen panels" but they are pipe panels. I would hate to maneuver them around to make a round pen. Our horses really do appreciate the openness, and I like the air circulation. They aren't as easy to manipulate as I'd like, not for me anyway, because they ARE so heavy. But more flexible than solid wood stalls, definitely!

    We do usually put some sort of boundary down when we use them for foals, though we have also had a foal "visit next door" by lying down next to a panel and getting up on the other side. So far, knock wood, no harm has been done. We have had success using deer fencing attached with zip ties when we do want to make a boundary.

    The one interesting thing I've found is that our horses need to "learn" to go into solid-sided stalls. I have taken horses to clinics or sent them out for training, and they can't understand why they have been left in a box. They need to learn it -- I wish I had at least one solid-sided stall at home to train them with. Some of the youngsters who have never known anything BUT the pipe panels are really upset in a normal stall, including one colic at a clinic that I think was sheer stress.
    Last edited by JoZ; Feb. 28, 2009 at 11:03 PM. Reason: clarity
    Arrange whatever pieces come your way. - Virginia Woolf

    Did you know that if you say the word "GULLIBLE" really softly, it sounds like "ORANGES"?



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov. 22, 2003
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    7,136

    Default

    You might want to put a solid partition near where the horse EATS, to avoid bullying, anxiety, not eating, and oter colic-causing experiences.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2004
    Location
    Houston, Tx
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    1,028

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    All the stalls in my barn are made from pipe panels. I lined the panels with 3/4 in plywood so the walls are a solid 4 from the bottom. My horses do kick occaisionally and the plywood breaks down sometimes, I just replace the sheet. I use heavy duty zip ties to attach the plywood to the panels. The stalls are 3 sided with the panels being attached to each other and the poles that the barn is made from. Works good for me and relatively easy to reconfigure when necessary.

    Jill



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jan. 2, 2007
    Location
    Alpharetta
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    2,090

    Default

    anyone have pictures??



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2008
    Location
    Legacy Hill Stables, Kansas
    Posts
    85

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    one of my close friends here in KS has a barn that does just this. She used cattle panels as the dividers between stall walls. all the horses that have been stabled there have loved them because of the air flow and freedom they allow. I have kept my horse in their barn overnight and i have to say she was sorry to come home

    i would highly recommend them!
    Kansas girl trying her hand at Area 8



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2005
    Location
    Washington State
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    1,481

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    I split a 12x12 stall in half with a panel. Storage on one side, my mini on the other. I hang the big horse blankets on the panel to air out and keep Mocha from sticking her head through the panel. Works great except it's a pain to get into the storage area. Quite often I'll use panels to set up a "stall" outside so an injured horse on stall rest can be near the other horses and not cooped up by himself in the barn.
    Crayola Posse - Pine Green
    RIP Whinnie Pine (June 4, 1977 - April 29, 2008)



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Mar. 13, 2007
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    900

    Default

    My girls (3 OTTBs and an APHA) spent over six months in temporary stalling made from round-pen panels while their new barn was being built. All told, there were 24 horses stalled in a metal barn open at both ends (since it was summer).

    The BO was careful about who lived next to whom. No one got hurt, and I think they liked all the openess of the set-up and being able to see their buddies.

    Here's a pic:

    http://s127.photobucket.com/albums/p...ent=rosie1.jpg
    "Dogs give and give and give. Cats are the gift that keeps on grifting." –Bradley Trevor Greive



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jul. 2, 2005
    Posts
    1,636

    Default

    http://gravesmountain.com/horseback.htm

    Check this out at the bottom of the page. I've been thinking about going there, but was nervous about the stalls. They're more common than I thought.
    ********
    There is no snooze button on a cat that wants breakfast.



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