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  1. #1
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    Smile If you could refit your outfit in fulltree ex saddles




  2. #2
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    Truthfully I don't like either link. They all look too big and bulky.



  3. #3
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    I like the saddles in the second link. Like Laurierace said they may be too bulky for galloping at the track but for at the farm they would probably be much more comfortable for the riders, and the horses, where we are on them for more time then at the racetrack. Since both suppliers look to be from UK it would make sense also since they are generally on the horses for a longer period of time than at the US tracks.



  4. #4
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    Just curious, why would you choose full tree instead of half? Or is this for non race training?



  5. #5
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    I like the saddle in the first link...but I still prefer a nice softback saddle to gallop in!



  6. #6
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    Dec. 29, 2008
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    I personally like a full tree to distribute the rider's weight over a larger area. I don't gallop anymore (too old). The first saddle's flap is a bit too forward for my tastes. Fine on an older horse, but a bit awkard galloping babies. The second has a seat that looks a bit too deep.



  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lady Counselor View Post
    Just curious, why would you choose full tree instead of half?
    I've read that half tree saddles are tough on their backs; however, when I used them I never remember putting any white hairs on anyone's backs nor do I remember anyone having sore backs. (I worked on a farm where we often spent more than an hour on the horses.) Anyway, in response to the claim that half tree saddles are tough on tb's backs some of the manufacturers in England have been experimenting with full tree saddles. There is one called the Fusion that has gel foam panels and I think the broader seat in the first link is the result of trying to make a more forgiving saddle.

    Or is this for non race training?
    Although I may race one mare, I don't really need an exercise saddle to condition her to race. However, I just learned the saddle that fits her is beyond repair so I need something to replace it. I really miss the simplicity of an exercise saddle and so I'm considering buying one to replace the saddle that died. I'd love to know how these full tree saddles are working out for those who use them.



  8. #8
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    Ah. I see. While I've never used full tree while galloping, I can see some benefits for easing the weight across their backs. Would you run into the issue of needing different sized trees now?
    Do you use closed cell neoprene pads under the saddles? That is what I've used for some horses and they seemed to work well for distributing the weight.
    As far as exercise saddles, I bought a really comfortable one a few years ago, I think from KY Vet. It's the one with the tooled flaps and padded suede seat. I like it, it's very comfortable.



  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lady Counselor View Post
    Ah. I see. While I've never used full tree while galloping, I can see some benefits for easing the weight across their backs. Would you run into the issue of needing different sized trees now?
    I don't know, but I imagine you might.
    Quote Originally Posted by Lady Counselor View Post
    Do you use closed cell neoprene pads under the saddles? That is what I've used for some horses and they seemed to work well for distributing the weight.
    I don't know but it sounds like a good idea.
    Quote Originally Posted by Lady Counselor View Post
    As far as exercise saddles, I bought a really comfortable one a few years ago, I think from KY Vet. It's the one with the tooled flaps and padded suede seat. I like it, it's very comfortable.
    It looks great



  10. #10
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    I use thinline pads on every horse. If its a horse whose saddle tends to slip it goes under the saddle pad, otherwise they go on top. I have tried every pad that came along over the years and these are the only ones I've stuck with.



  11. #11
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    When I was exercising steeplechasers, I was going between the softback (which I liked, and used with a gel pade) and this saddle: http://www.berneybrossaddles.com/curragh.html

    I LOVED that saddle. Even hunted in it one day. It's a bit on the heavier side, but always fit the horses well, and was a comfy transition from me going from a close-contact saddle (when I rode hunter/jumpers) to the softback.



  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteeleRdr View Post
    When I was exercising steeplechasers, I was going between the softback (which I liked, and used with a gel pade) and this saddle: http://www.berneybrossaddles.com/curragh.html

    I LOVED that saddle. Even hunted in it one day. It's a bit on the heavier side, but always fit the horses well, and was a comfy transition from me going from a close-contact saddle (when I rode hunter/jumpers) to the softback.
    Really?! I contacted them about a year ago and they said sure you can hunt in it. But then I contacted Gibson saddlery and they said no, no way so I chickened out. Now that my saddle is dead I might go for the Berney Bros full tree after all. Thanks for the info



  13. #13
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    Did they give you a reason why you couldn't hunt in it? It was one of the only saddles that fit one of our race horses who hunted over the winter, so I just lengthened the stirrups (like two holes) from where I galloped at. Horse did fine in it. Friend of mine did a lot of point to points in the saddle too. She needed weight and instead of adding a ton of lead, used that saddle.



  14. #14
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    No. When I asked at Gibson's I was referring to one of their saddles that was like Berney Bros in that it was full tree and wool flocked. He said no, it wouldn't work, that I needed a hunting saddle for hunting. He was so definite in his answer I didn't press the issue. Besides, I had a Flyover that was just as comfortable as an ex saddle so I just went with that.

    By chance did the curragh fit high long withers?



  15. #15
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    It did. Most of ours had your pretty typical TB withers (read: sharkfin).



  16. #16
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    I have a full tree steeplechase saddle that I used as a second gallop saddle, though my beavertail saddle was my favourate. I used the full tree saddle as required, and if required. But there were horses that it didn't fit as well as the half treed one did. The boney butted jocks would complain if they drew the full treed saddle, but I always found it to be OK to gallop in. Mine is Australian made, the stirrup bars have no safety catches on them, the leathers go around the tree itself, there are no stirrup bars like most saddles have. I bought it because the trainer I worked with as a kid had one, a very old one, and he liked it, and this one was cheap for me to buy.

    A friend of mine has a Pariani (sp?) saddle that is about half size, bigger and heavier than most gallop saddles, but full tree as well. Not really a steeplechase type of cut, but still very interesting. She uses it occasionally, but again, riders complain about anything out of the ordinary sometimes.



  17. #17
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    I don't care for either as well. For me, the more simple the better. I don't even like those padded seats or even those huge big bulky pads either (they have a hard time fitting a horse which leads to shifting of the saddle). I prefer it to be just basic with a foam pad that is shaped like the saddle as well. Majority of the time you are standing up. Also, I think its pretty rare a horse's back will become sore due to it considering the horse really only is being ridden for 10 to 15 minutes at a time.



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