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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Feb. 7, 2009
    Location
    Newark OH
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    203

    Post It depends....

    I fed my QH stallion garlic in his feed (garlic powder that you can get at wal-mart) and my sister in law at the time fed it to her Arab studs and it did help with the fly number not so much the biting. We just sprinkled a little and the boys didn't seem to mind it we just mixed it well. Although I have fed it to my Appendix mare and Arab gelding I had and had the same results (they were on 24/7 pasture the studs weren't). So I think it helps only if everyone is on it and as long as your not feeding it in great amounts.

    I will try the vinegar that sounds like a great idea!!
    Proud Owner of Acertifiable Sonny 1996 AQHA Sorrel Gelding
    -- I loff my QH Clique



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Mar. 28, 2006
    Location
    Horse Country, NC
    Posts
    163

    Default

    One of our boarders feeds so much garlic (and she is the only one to do so) - you can smell Little Italy as soon as you enter the barn.. the fellow who feeds has watery eyes from the stuff. I am of Italian extraction but mamma mia! Plus, interestingly, she has behavior issues with this horse, he's alternately lethargic or massively spooky.



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
    Location
    NorthEast
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    24,508

    Default

    Plus, interestingly, she has behavior issues with this horse, he's alternately lethargic or massively spooky.
    Same with my husband.
    He's either out cold on the couch or hollering at the TV.
    You jump in the saddle,
    Hold onto the bridle!
    Jump in the line!
    ...Belefonte



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Oct. 14, 2004
    Location
    Connecticut
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    9,015

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MistyBlue View Post
    Same with my husband.
    He's either out cold on the couch or hollering at the TV.
    Take away the garlic NOW!



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jan. 15, 2004
    Location
    Lancaster, PA, USA
    Posts
    7,578

    Default

    I have seen most of the anemia reports and like too many things in "medical" research them amount they fed in the trials was so excessive that it would never be the amount you would feed your horse plus even if you WANTED to feed that much it would be prohibitively expensive!! Plus as noted..the studies were on wild onions, NOT garlic. The studies thought since wild onions were a relative of garlic then "that is close enough". Not for me! I do not extrapolate the same problems from a "relative" of the tested product!
    My 2 cents: it takes a couple weeks of feeding it to notice a difference. The horses that had flies that covered their poor faces pre garlic had a few post garlic but not nearly as many and they swarmed AROUND the horses but did not seem to LAND on them nearly so much. Masks are a joke here except for on the "oral" herd boss as that gelding makes a game of going around and pulling the fly masks off of everyone else.
    It is useless for biting flies (nothing but Bite Free seems to help with them and I only use that away from home as fortunately we do not have too many greenheads/horseflies here thank goodnes.) The barn smells like an Italian restaurant when the horses poop...but so what! Our dog loves horse feed and also gets to smell like garlic when she gets feed out of the feed pans when we pasture feed. It did not seem to help the fleas on her but I DID notice a big drop in the ticks on her in garlic mode.
    To be on the safe side I probably would not give to horses known to have anemia issues.
    It does make a difference if you get better versus cheaper garlic (fresher) and I get it from Springtime Labs. Lately they have been having good sales on buy one get one free so it's time to stock up.
    I noticed a difference in the fly populations on the faces of all but ONE horse here. I have no idea why, but all the others were better and he seemed to have just as many flies on his face as ever. Luckily he is The Puller Offer Of Flymasks but no one gets HIS so he just gets a flymask on!
    I have also read in a dog journal the galic is bad for dogs but never any evidence about WHY. I have not had any ill effects from it. The Golden Retriever we had until last fall (died at 16 of skin cancer) had itchy skin problems and hotspots all his life and would dig himself bald every summer. We tried all kinds of food, steroids, antihistamines...nothing worked. I tried the garlic and yeast pills from Springtime for dogs and for the first time the poor guy got through summer without going bald.
    As to the ticks: I worry far more about them than the garlic. We have a big problem with Lyme disease around here....and the tick population on the doggie did drop a lot when she snarfed the garlicky horse feed.
    Added: since the garlic does seem to help with the ticks and Lyme is a big problem here: I am much more worried about the ticks than I am about anemia. The garlic stays.
    Last edited by camohn; Feb. 24, 2009 at 04:57 PM.



  6. #26
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    Jul. 19, 2003
    Location
    Middleburg, VA
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    12,980

    Default

    Agree with camohn. It does take a week or two to tell a difference. I found out about the tick thing kinda accidentally. A couple of years ago, a new client arrived with two horses. Within a day or two of them going out on our pastures, both her horses were coming in with TONS of ticks, while we would maybe find one or two ticks a day on ANY of the ones that had been on the farm (and on garlic). Her father was an alarmist and was all up in arms with me about it, and I wasn't really sure what to tell them, since I hadn't been having this type of problem, AT ALL. Grasping at straws, I mentioned that they'd both just started to get garlic, and that that should help. Then, I thought about and realized that might be exactly why I hadn't been having that problem. Sure enough, with in a week or two, her horses stopped carrying in ticks.



  7. #27
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    Nov. 20, 2008
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    NJ
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    2,195

    Default

    I happened to stumble across this in the Horse Journal (July 2005) last night while researching something else. Apparently, there was a study performed at the University of Guelph and published in the American Journal of Veterinary Research that "confirmed that horses will voluntarily eat enough garlic to result in anemia"(quotes from Horse Journal article). Unfortunately, the article did not reference when it was published in the Veterinary Journal. In the study, the horses were fed freeze dried garlic up to the max amount they would voluntarily eat and horses that ate over .2 mg/kg body wt (3.5 oz for 1,100 lb horse) did cause anemia. Not sure if this helps or hinders but I thought I'd pass it on FWIW.



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2002
    Location
    Azle, Teh-has
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    7,748

    Default Horsetech has a cool bug zapper mix...

    http://horsetech.com/buggzo.htm#Quic...roduct%20Pages

    Notable Ingredients:

    Garlic and Aroma Controlled Garlic: Garlic often serves as the cornerstone ingredient in natural "insect products". HorseTech uses a select blend of two garlic sources, one being an aroma controlled material that subtly softens the natural aroma of our product. In addition to helping to keep bugs away, garlic is believed to benefit the respiratory, circulatory and digestive systems while serving as a natural source of sulfur.

    Apple Cider Vinegar: We sourced a unique dry apple cider vinegar that's pH buffered--so, it is easier on the stomach. Our Buggzo pellets, made with this dry vinegar, aren't at all messy like products featuring regular liquid vinegar. You're going to love the fact that you don't have to mess with liquid vinegar any longer!

    Thiamine: A B-vitamin usually associated with calming. Believed to be helpful in repelling insects as well! Each one ounce serving of Buggzo pellets provides a full 1,000 mg of Thiamine!

    Diatomaceous Earth: Often promoted as a natural way to "score" insect larva in manure preventing them from reaching maturity.

    B-Complex Vitamins: The vitamin group most commonly associated with healthy skin and coat.

    Grapeseed Extract:
    One of the more powerful antioxidants available for equine products!
    http://kaboomeventing.com/
    http://kaboomeventing.blogspot.com/
    Horses are amazing athletes and make no mistake -- they are the stars of the show!



  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jan. 15, 2004
    Location
    Lancaster, PA, USA
    Posts
    7,578

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mkevent View Post
    I happened to stumble across this in the Horse Journal (July 2005) last night while researching something else. Apparently, there was a study performed at the University of Guelph and published in the American Journal of Veterinary Research that "confirmed that horses will voluntarily eat enough garlic to result in anemia"(quotes from Horse Journal article). Unfortunately, the article did not reference when it was published in the Veterinary Journal. In the study, the horses were fed freeze dried garlic up to the max amount they would voluntarily eat and horses that ate over .2 mg/kg body wt (3.5 oz for 1,100 lb horse) did cause anemia. Not sure if this helps or hinders but I thought I'd pass it on FWIW.
    Even if that is true it would cost a fortune! People who are allowed to eat all the sugar they want become diabetic too. No one has pulled sugar from the market. It's all about moderation.



  10. #30

    Default

    funny story: had a friend who fed her horse garlic. She met our trainer at shows. After the second day of gaging every time the trainer walked on to the row she finally told the people they had to stop feeding garlic or stall somewhere else in the future. The horse absolutely reeked!

    I would suggest some other form of fly control besides feeding garlic.
    "are you yawning? You don't ride well enough to yawn...I can yawn, because I ride better than you, Meredith Michael Beerbaum can yawn, you, not so much..." George Morris in Camden, SC



  11. #31
    LAPomeroy Guest

    Default I think the best garlic fly repellent is...

    Fly Away Garlic by Equilite
    has the NASC seal of approval for safety
    natural ingredients, good for horses & dogs
    cold processed to preserve allicin and garlic's other nutritional components
    hugely ecoomical - 1 lb lasts 1 month
    find it online at www.equilite.com



  12. #32
    Join Date
    Oct. 12, 2001
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    6,901

    Default

    Here are abstracts to some studies if anyone is interested:




    Am J Vet Res. 2005 Mar;66(3):457-65.

    Association of maximum voluntary dietary intake of freeze-dried garlic with Heinz body anemia in horses.
    Pearson W, Boermans HJ, Bettger WJ, McBride BW, Lindinger MI.

    Department of Animal and Poultry Science, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, N1G 2W1 Canada.

    Abstract
    OBJECTIVE: To characterize hematologic and clinical consequences of chronic dietary consumption of freeze-dried garlic at maximum voluntary intake in horses. ANIMALS: 4 healthy sex- and age-matched horses. PROCEDURE: An initial garlic dose (0.05 g/kg, twice daily) was fed to 2 horses in a molasses carrier as part of their normal ration and was gradually increased to maximum voluntary intake (0.25 g/kg, twice daily) over 41 days. Dietary supplementation then continued for a total of 71 days. Two control horses were fed molasses with no garlic with their ration. Blood samples were collected weekly and analyzed for hematologic and biochemical changes, including the presence of Heinz bodies. Recovery of affected blood values was followed for 5 weeks after termination of dietary supplementation with garlic. RESULTS: At a daily dose of > 0.2 g/kg, horses fed garlic developed hematologic and biochemical indications of Heinz body anemia, as characterized by increases in Heinz body score (HBS), mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular hemoglobin, platelet count, and serum unconjugated and total bilirubin concentrations and decreases in RBC count, blood hemoglobin concentration, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, and serum haptoglobin concentration. Recovery from anemia was largely complete within 5 weeks after termination of dietary supplementation with garlic. Heinz body score and MCV remained high at the end of the 5-week recovery period. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Horses will voluntarily consume sufficient quantities of garlic to cause Heinz body anemia. The potential for garlic toxicosis exists when horses are chronically fed garlic. Further study is required to determine the safe dietary dose of garlic in horses.

    PMID: 15822591 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


    J Am Anim Hosp Assoc. 2005 Jan-Feb;41(1):68-73.

    Heinz body hemolytic anemia with eccentrocytosis from ingestion of Chinese chive (Allium tuberosum) and garlic (Allium sativum) in a dog.
    Yamato O, Kasai E, Katsura T, Takahashi S, Shiota T, Tajima M, Yamasaki M, Maede Y.

    Laboratory of Internal Medicine, Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine, Hokkaido University, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Japan.

    Abstract
    A 4-year-old, intact male miniature schnauzer was presented with anorexia. The dog had ingested some Chinese steamed dumplings 2 days before, which contained Chinese chive (Allium tuberosum) and garlic (Allium sativum). Hematological examinations revealed severe Heinz body hemolytic anemia with eccentrocytosis and an increased concentration of methemoglobin, which was thought to result from oxidative damage to erythrocytes by constituents in these Allium plants. In this case, eccentrocytosis was a hallmark finding and could be detected easily, suggesting that this hematological abnormality is useful in diagnosing Allium plant-induced hemolysis.

    PMID: 15634869 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

    Am J Vet Res. 2000 Nov;61(11):1446-50.

    Hematologic changes associated with the appearance of eccentrocytes after intragastric administration of garlic extract to dogs.
    Lee KW, Yamato O, Tajima M, Kuraoka M, Omae S, Maede Y.

    Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan.

    Abstract
    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether dogs given garlic extract developed hemolytic anemia and to establish the hematologic characteristics induced experimentally by intragastric administration of garlic extract. ANIMALS: 8 healthy adult mixed-breed dogs. PROCEDURE: 4 dogs were given 1.25 ml of garlic extract/kg of body weight (5 g of whole garlic/kg) intragastrically once a day for 7 days. The remaining 4 control dogs received water instead of garlic extract. Complete blood counts were performed, and methemoglobin and erythrocyte-reduced glutathione concentrations, percentage of erythrocytes with Heinz bodies, and percentage of eccentrocytes were determined before and for 30 days after administration of the first dose of garlic extract. Ultrastructural analysis of eccentrocytes was performed. RESULTS: Compared with initial values, erythrocyte count, Hct, and hemoglobin concentration decreased to a minimum value on days 9 to 11 in dogs given garlic extract. Heinz body formation, an increase in erythrocyte-reduced glutathione concentration, and eccentrocytes were also detected in these dogs. However, no dog developed hemolytic anemia. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: The constituents of garlic have the potential to oxidize erythrocyte membranes and hemoglobin, inducing hemolysis associated with the appearance of eccentrocytes in dogs. Thus, foods containing garlic should not be fed to dogs. Eccentrocytosis appears to be a major diagnostic feature of garlic-induced hemolysis in dogs.

    PMID: 11108195 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

    Vet Clin Pathol. 2005 Sep;34(3):224-31.

    A retrospective study of 60 cases of eccentrocytosis in the dog.
    Caldin M, Carli E, Furlanello T, Solano-Gallego L, Tasca S, Patron C, Lubas G.

    Clinica Veterinaria Privata San Marco, Laboratorio Veterinario Privato San Marco, Padua, Italy.

    Abstract
    BACKGROUND: Eccentrocytes are RBCs that appear in a peripheral blood smear to have their hemoglobin shifted to one side of the cell. This abnormality, which is confined to the RBC membrane and cytoskeleton, is induced by oxidative damage. Eccentrocytes have been reported rarely in dogs and are associated with onion and garlic ingestion and the administration of oxidant drugs. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to describe the occurrence and severity of eccentrocytosis in dogs and the diseases or disorders associated with eccentrocytes. METHODS: Detailed history, and results of physical examination, CBC, biochemical and coagulation profiles, and urinalysis from all canine patients admitted during a 2.5-year period were evaluated. Eccentrocytes, when observed, were graded 1+ (few) to 4+ (many). The severity of eccentrocytosis was compared with that of anemia and reticulocytosis. RESULTS: Eccentrocytes were found in blood smears from 60 of 4251 dogs (1.4%) and were associated with mild to moderate anemia in 40 (66.6%) of the cases. Eccentrocytosis was found in 16 (26.6%) dogs with drug administration, 11 (18.3%) with presumptive onion and garlic ingestion, 8 (13.3%) with vitamin K antagonist intoxication, 7 (11.6%) with ketoacidotic diabetes, 5 (8.3%) with T-cell lymphoma, 4 (6.6%) with severe infections, 1 (1.6%) with compensated diabetes mellitus, and 8 (13.3%) with other conditions. Certain dog breeds, such as Whippet, Boxer, and English Setter, and young dogs seemed to be overrepresented. CONCLUSIONS: We describe, for the first time, associations between eccentrocytes and diabetes mellitus, T-cell lymphoma and vitamin K antagonist intoxication in dogs. The significance of eccentrocytes should not be underestimated, because they can be a signal of an oxidative process.

    PMID: 16134069 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


    Med Vet Entomol. 2005 Mar;19(1):84-9.

    A double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial of garlic as a mosquito repellant: a preliminary study.
    Rajan TV, Hein M, Porte P, Wikel S.

    Department of Pathology, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, CT 06030-3105, USA. rajan@neuron.uchc.edu

    Abstract
    The hypothesis that the ingestion of garlic provides protection against bloodsucking pests such as mosquitoes was investigated using a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled crossover study. Subjects were asked to consume either garlic (one visit) or a placebo (the other visit). They were then exposed to laboratory-reared Aedes aegypti (Linnaeus) (Diptera: Culicidae). The numbers of mosquitoes that did not feed on the subjects, the number of mosquito bites, the weights of the mosquitoes after feeding and the amounts of blood ingested were determined. The data did not provide evidence of significant systemic mosquito repellence. A limitation of the study is that more prolonged ingestion of garlic may be needed to accomplish repellence.

    PMID: 15752181 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
    Vol. 285 No. 1, January 3, 2001 JAMA
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    Garlic as a Tick Repellent
    To the Editor: In their Research Letter, Ms Stjernberg and Dr Berglund1 documented a repellent effect of garlic against an unnamed species of tick and stated that daily consumption of 1200 mg of garlic was an alternative to "other agents that might have more adverse effects." Based on the design of their study, any conclusions concerning the relative effectiveness and safety of garlic as a tick repellent are unfounded. They compared garlic to a placebo, not to other currently available repellents, and they did not present any data on the comparative safety of garlic vs other repellents.

    In fact, consumption of garlic appeared to be only marginally better than doing nothing at all to prevent tick bites. By contrast, treatment of clothing with permethrin, a synthetic pyrethroid, has been shown to be 100% effective against Ixodes scapularis,2 the vector of Borrelia burgdorferi in the northeastern United States, and to provide nearly 100% protection against Amblyomma americanum and Dermacentor variabilis.3 Diethyltoluamide (DEET)-based repellents also are effective in repelling ticks2 and can be applied to skin, as well as to clothing. The US Department of Defense (DoD) promotes the concurrent use of a 33% DEET-based lotion on exposed skin, treatment of uniforms with permethrin, and proper wearing of the uniform. This strategy has been termed the DoD Repellent System and is believed to be the most effective method for reducing the risk of arthropod bites.4

    Brown and Hebert5 were cited as the source of information on adverse effects of repellents other than garlic. In fact, they concluded that appropriate use of repellents was a "safe means of minimizing the risk of bites and vector-borne diseases." In additional reviews, DEET has been associated with "remarkably few problems"6 while the concurrent use of DEET and permethrin was judged "safe and effective."4

    The study by Stjernberg and Berglund raises 2 additional questions. First, does garlic effectively repel other arthropods of medical importance? Troops frequently are at risk of attack by several arthropod taxa and need a repellent that is broadly effective. The DoD Repellent System is extremely effective in repelling a number of arthropods in addition to ticks.4 Second, how difficult is it to ensure compliance with a daily regimen of 1200 mg garlic? That is, do troops find garlic acceptable, and can they be relied on to remember to take daily doses? Treatment of uniforms with permethrin can provide repellency for the life of the garment while requiring no action on the part of the wearer.4 For troops and other populations at high risk for arthropod bites, the use of DEET and permethrin remains the most effective and safe method of protection.

    Chad P. McHugh, MPH,PhD
    Air Force Institute for Environment, Safety and Occupational Health Risk Analysis
    Brooks Air Force Base, Tex



    1. Stjernberg L, Berglund J. Garlic as an insect repellent. JAMA. 2000;284:831. FREE FULL TEXT
    2. Schreck CE, Snoddy EL, Spielman A. Pressurized sprays of permethrin or DEET on military clothing for personal protection against Ixodes dammini (Acari: Ixodidae). J Med Entomol. 1986;23:396-399. PUBMED
    3. Evans SR, Korch GW, Lawson MA. Comparative field evaluation of permethrin and DEET-treated military uniforms for personal protection against ticks (Acari). J Med Entomol. 1990;27:829-834. WEB OF SCIENCE | PUBMED
    4. Young GD, Evans S. Safety and efficacy of DEET and permethrin in the prevention of arthropod attack. Mil Med. 1998;163:324-330. PUBMED
    5. Brown M, Hebert AA. Insect repellents: an overview. J Am Acad Dermatol. 1997;36:243-249. FULL TEXT | WEB OF SCIENCE | PUBMED
    6. Goodyear L, Behrens RH. Short report: the safety and toxicity of insect repellents. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 1998;59:323-324. ABSTRACT




    To the Editor: Ms Stjernberg and Dr Berglund1 reported that garlic may be an effective tick repellent. However, the content of sulfuric compounds in garlic is subject to large variations that influence pharmacological effects and the only information about the garlic preparation in their study is "1200 mg/d Allium sativum in capsule form." There was no information about whether the plant material was fresh, dried, or treated in any way. Herbal preparations containing garlic are normally prepared in several different ways, such as dried, fermented, oil macerated, or solvent extracted.

    Stjernberg and Berglund also state that "diethyltoluamide is the best repellent against insect vectors." DEET is the most commonly used mosquito repellent and has activity against other insects. However, several other compounds and even plant extracts have a mosquito-repellent effect of the same magnitude as that of DEET.2-3 Furthermore, permethrin is a synthetic pyrethroid, ie, insecticide and acaricide, and not a true repellent.

    Håkan Tunón, PhD
    Swedish Biodiversity Centre
    Swedish Agricultural University
    Uppsala, Sweden



    1. Stjernberg L, Berglund J. Garlic as an insect repellent. JAMA. 2000;284:831. FREE FULL TEXT
    2. Tunón H, Thorsell W, Bohlin L. Mosquito-repelling activity of compounds occurring in Achillea millefolium L. (Asteraceae). Econ Bot. 1994;48:111-120.
    3. Thorsell W, Mikiver A, Malander I, Tunón H. Efficacy of plant extracts and oils as mosquito repellents. Phytomedicine. 1998;5:311-323.




    To the Editor: Ms Stjernberg and Dr Berglund1 recently presented a randomized, double-blind, crossover trial of garlic to prevent tick bites among Swedish military conscripts. Fifty subjects were treated with garlic first and placebo second while another 50 were given placebo first and then garlic. The total number of subjects was thus 100. Of these, 66 were reported to have been bitten by ticks. The authors presented a relative risk (RR) of 0.79 with the 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.65-0.96. They did not reveal the number of bitten subjects per sequence.

    In a crossover trial the RR is calculated from discordant pairs, ie, the number of subjects with more events on active treatment than on placebo is compared with the number of subjects with more events on placebo than on active treatment. The more effective the treatment is the lower ratio between the 2 numbers. In this trial, a discordant pair is a subject with at least 1 bite while receiving either active or placebo treatment. The number of subjects entering the analysis could therefore be lower, but not greater, than 66. Several possible sets of discordant pairs among these 66 conscripts could give a RR of approximately 0.79, but the P value could not be lower than .39 (exact McNemar test using maximum possible sample size, 37 + 29 = 66 discordant pairs). The corresponding CI is 0.46-1.31.

    The authors also present a P value of .04 for the difference in number of tick bites between treatments. However, using tick bite as analysis unit instead of conscript is incorrect since the risk of a tick bite differs between conscripts; counting tick bites instead of conscripts in a traditional single-level analysis exaggerates the statistical significance of the findings.2

    Jonas Ranstam, PhD
    School of Health and Society
    Malmö University
    Malmö, Sweden



    1. Stjernberg L, Berglund J. Garlic as an insect repellent. JAMA. 2000;284:831. FREE FULL TEXT
    2. Ranstam J. Repeated measurement and analysis units. Acta Orthop Scand. 1998;69:345-346. WEB OF SCIENCE | PUBMED




    In Reply: In response to Dr McHugh, our study specifically assessed the effectiveness of garlic as a repellent for tick bites. We did not measure its effectiveness for other arthropods or insects, nor did we compare it with other repellents. We choose military personnel because their behavior is relatively consistent.

    Both McHugh and Dr Tunón point out that there are other effective insecticides and repellents. However, the adverse effects of DEET and permethrin are a subject of recurrent debate. Swedish regulations concerning the use of these products are very strict, for permethrin because of toxicity in aquatic organisms1 and for DEET because of studies showing adverse effects in humans.2-3 Thus, Swedish troops cannot use permethrin- or DEET-treated uniforms. In Sweden, garlic might be considered as an alternative to other repellents for people staying in tick endemic areas. Of course, treatment of clothes with permethrin guarantees a much higher level of protection as long as the clothing are worn. Garlic should certainly not be substituted for more effective protective measurements in areas that are endemic to other vector borne diseases, such as malaria.

    In response to Dr Ranstam, all participants in our trial recorded in a diary the time of exposure and observed tick bites. This allowed us to standardize for time of exposure. Our statements were related to per protocol analysis only, which lead us to be conservative in our conclusions. Per protocol statements included all individuals fulfilling the study requirements and describes the time the study drug was taken as directed; all episodes with deviating compliance were excluded.

    The 2 periods of observation differed in length, and some units spent different amounts of time within each period. Therefore, we considered the Wilcoxon test for paired observations a more appropriate method to test our hypothesis. This test for paired samples compared the individual number of tick bites per unit of time (days) between placebo and active treatment.

    However, when presenting the RRs we compared (standardized for time of exposure) the number of bitten participants in the placebo groups with the number of bitten participants in the garlic groups and did not take into consideration the crossover design when comparing paired samples. We agree that this is inappropriate and that CIs should not have been presented.

    Louise Stjernberg, RN,MPH
    Department of Science and Health
    Blekinge Institute of Technology
    Karlskrona, Sweden


    Johan Berglund, MD,PhD
    Department of Community Medicine
    Lund University
    Malmö, Sweden



    1. Torstensson L. Ecotoxicity Evaluation of Permethrin. Uppsala: Swedish Agricultural University; 1989.
    2. Brown M, Hebert AA. Insect repellents: an overview. J Am Acad Dermatol. 1997;36:243-249. FULL TEXT | WEB OF SCIENCE | PUBMED
    3. Clem JR, Havemann DF, Raebel MA. Insect repellent (N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide) cardiovascular toxicity in an adult. Ann Pharmacother. 1993;27:289-293. ABSTRACT


    Letters Section Editor: Stephen J. Lurie, MD, PhD, Senior Editor.


    JAMA. 2001;285:41-42.



  13. #33
    Join Date
    Nov. 10, 2005
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    Va
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    I have fed my mare garlic for about 6 years in the warm season. I also used to feed it to my app gelding. I think it makes some difference for flies, but an even greater difference in repelling ticks. My app gelding was extremely sensitive to tick bites. He would develop ping pong ball size oozing swollen sores. After I started using the garlic, I noticed he no longer had this problem. My gelding has since passed away(old age), but I continued using the garlic in the warm weather for my TB mare as she lives on pasture board and we do quite a bit of trail riding. I have never had a problem with my mare reeking of garlic. The only time I can smell it is when I am adding it to the food and on her right after she has eaten.



  14. #34
    Join Date
    May. 9, 2008
    Posts
    2,887

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    I am using garlic for most of the horses, and blood work has not shown any anemia and they look and act fine. I think they smell yummy too

    All the horses except for Katie LOVE it and she wont go anywhere near it, she will actually leave her food. And if you know anything about my chunky mule girl you know that leaving food is not a normal occurrence for her lol! But the rest of them? I mean they seriously LOVE it. The littlest one, Rye, he will shove his food out of the way and lick up all the garlic before anything else.

    My observations?

    I haven't had to use any spray yet this year on any of the horses but Kate, and we have had 90 degree days with lots of flies. I still use fly masks, but have not needed sheets or sprays. I will see her out there swishing away, stomping and I have to spray a couple of times a day. She'll be covered. But the others? Not a fly in site and Paco could be standing right next to Kate and they will fly around him but not land.

    The dogs get the same thing and I haven't pulled a tick in ages.
    I Loff My Quarter Horse & I love Fenway Bartholomule cliques

    Just somebody with a positive outlook on life...go ahead...hate me for that.



  15. #35
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2003
    Location
    Middleburg, VA
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    Wendy, admittedly there is no way I could read all that, however, I did read the first study. A horse would have to eat close to HALF A POUND of garlic to show signs of anemia. My little tablespoon (maybe) doesn't even come close to that. And, like I said before, just about everything is dangerous...and if you let a horse voluntarily eat just about anything as much as they want, yes, bad things DO happen. If I let the ponies out on the lush grass yard what would happen? They'd eat themselves silly to the point of founder. Grass isn't bad (well, a lot of people think it is, but a lot of people think garlic is too), but if I let a fat little pony eat until he popped, yes, it would be bad.

    The studies are interesting (though a few of them are about dogs and I don't think you can safely relate studies on dogs to horses...they are just too different), but I think they cause a lot of unnecessary alarm.



  16. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by yellowbritches View Post
    Wendy, admittedly there is no way I could read all that, however, I did read the first study. A horse would have to eat close to HALF A POUND of garlic to show signs of anemia.
    Not necessarily.
    There have been cases of horses consuming the recommended daily doses of garlic which have resulted in anemia which resolved when the garlic was discontinued.

    The take home message is that the stuff is not all that reliable for arthropod repellent purposes, although it might help, but that it also has ptential hazards, just like everything else.

    I would recommend a baseline CBC before starting chronic administration of garlic, and then you'd have a basis for comparison if the horse developed problems later.
    Regardless, I'd pull an anemic horse off garlic until the anemia was resolved, whether or not garlic were the primary cause.
    "It's like a Russian nesting doll of train wrecks."--CaitlinandTheBay

    ...just settin' on the Group W bench.



  17. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ghazzu View Post
    Not necessarily.
    There have been cases of horses consuming the recommended daily doses of garlic which have resulted in anemia which resolved when the garlic was discontinued.

    The take home message is that the stuff is not all that reliable for arthropod repellent purposes, although it might help, but that it also has ptential hazards, just like everything else.

    I would recommend a baseline CBC before starting chronic administration of garlic, and then you'd have a basis for comparison if the horse developed problems later.
    Regardless, I'd pull an anemic horse off garlic until the anemia was resolved, whether or not garlic were the primary cause.
    ^^^this^^^

    I wouldn't start it willy nilly. Everything has risks, it is up to us to minimize them While it is working for us, it may not for others.
    I Loff My Quarter Horse & I love Fenway Bartholomule cliques

    Just somebody with a positive outlook on life...go ahead...hate me for that.



  18. #38
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    Jul. 6, 2005
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    I used garlic for two summers on two different farms. The first summer/first farm, it was a miracle. You absolutely could not find a single fly in my barn. (So, in answer to your question, I think it repels before biting.) The second summer/farm, it didn't seem to do anything. Same horses, just in a different location.

    So, I think it's worth trying. If it works, it will be fantastic. If it doesn't, you can stop using it.

    Even if it works for you, I wouldn't use it during the non-fly season due to the risk of Heinz body anemia. And if you have any horses with pre-existing anemia issues, I wouldn't use it with them.

    I used ABC's Organic Garlic from SmartPak.



  19. #39
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    Apr. 24, 2010
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    VA
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    A person at the barn I board at uses garlic. All it does is stink up the barn and make her horse smell bad. I use spot-on instead and it is more effective than garlic. My horse will be out in the field with no flies bothering him and the horse that uses the garlic will be swatting at flies the entire time. He was started on garlic during the winter and this is the second year that it has been used on him. I have used spot-on on both the horses that I have owned and it worked much better.



  20. #40
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    Apr. 11, 2007
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    Middle Tennessee
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    My experiences with garlic:

    1. I will not feed it to one of my four as he has ulcer issues and that's too bad because he's the one with severe reactions to bug and tick bites.

    2. I feed it to the other three on a seasonal basis to control ticks and it is 90% effective. We are surrounded by pine and cedar, therefore polluted with ticks.

    2.1 I keep saying it doesn't do much to keep the flies away, but the three horses on it have tails that are still dragging the ground by 2 - 4 inches, so they must not be doing too much swatting. Those tails will still be dragging the ground by mid-September when this obnoxious heat & humidity from h**l finally leaves. They are on pasture 12 hours daily this time of year.

    3. This is my seventh season to feed garlic and no one has ever become sick or anemic.

    3.1 DO NOT feed raw garlic as it is the allicin (SP?) that MAY cause anemia.

    3.2 I feed processed powdered garlic that I buy by the 20# tub from a manufacturer of equine herbs<----same company for seven seasons.

    3.1 Given where I live, I should start a bit earlier but "The Ides of March" (the 15th of March) has become my mental alarm to start them on garlic.

    3.2 I start out at about 1/2 teaspoon daily and work my way up to two teaspoon daily on all three. Right now they are getting a very slightly heaped teaspoon. I take anywhere from 2-1/2 to 3-1/2 weeks to work up to a level teaspoon.

    4. I stop feeding garlic once the weather gets cold enough to not see those evil creatures anymore (ticks). That can be anywhere from the end of October to mid-November.

    To reiterate, I would not feed garlic to a horse with colic and/or ulcer issues. I also am not saying it isn't possible for a horse to become anemic if they have some underlying health issue or are fed stupidly massive amounts. This is something that more is not better.

    One of my "garlic horses" has I-R for three years, so everyone gets a physical in the Fall when he gets his; they are "healthy as a horse" and pass with flying colors.

    Everyone of mine love the taste of the garlic powder and I could care less if my barn smells like a pizzeria; I'll take that any day over having to stand there for two hours picking ticks off everyone at night and doing massive worrying about lymes disease with them.



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