The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan. 20, 2007
    Location
    Northern Kentucky
    Posts
    1,097

    Default Part 1-Can I haul a 3-horse?

    Never mind the part about I have never hauled anything-I think I can learn-
    I am determined to get a used horse trailer. and I want/ think I could haul a gooseneck. I first thought I would get a 2-horse but the more I think about it, 3 people is such a good number for trail riding.

    A few months ago I bought a Dodge Ram 2500, gas, 2WD, 2001, 100K+ miles-already had gooseneck and brake controller and was used to haul horses. This is not my primary transportation but it seemed like a good deal. Talked to the previous owner who bought a diesel dually.

    The book says the hauling capacity is 8800 lbs.

    So if a 3-horse is 4800 + 1@1200, 1@1000 = about 8000. Is it too much?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun. 6, 2004
    Location
    A happy place filled with pony and puppy kisses :)
    Posts
    581

    Default

    I have a chevy 2500 and pull a goose neck trailer, 3 horse slant w/ dressing room with no issues at all. At most I have had 2 horses in the trailer and the front stall with trunks and such.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep. 17, 2003
    Location
    Fort Myers, Florida
    Posts
    2,667

    Default

    Remember to add on for yourself and also all the stuff too which can add to be quite a bit. Its always better to be overpowered than underpowered.

    It also makes quite a difference with the specific terrain you will be driving...hills? You also didn't say the motor /transmission this truck has...2500 refers to the suspension on the truck.
    "My treasures do not sparkle or glitter, they shine in the sunlight and nicker to me in the night"



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun. 16, 2001
    Location
    Los Angeles, California
    Posts
    4,377

    Default

    You can - but not safely.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun. 15, 2008
    Posts
    739

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 5 View Post
    You can - but not safely.


    Where do you guys keep coming from?
    Disclaimer;
    Nearly all of what I post will be controversial to someone. Believe nothing you read on a chat room, research for yourself and LEARN.
    Not in the 42% or the 96%



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun. 15, 2008
    Posts
    739

    Default

    No problem. It has the 5.9 Magnum engine and not the Hemi, correct? The Magnum series engines of that era are not exactly a powerhouse, but I should think it will suffice.


    What size trailer was the previous owner hauling?
    Disclaimer;
    Nearly all of what I post will be controversial to someone. Believe nothing you read on a chat room, research for yourself and LEARN.
    Not in the 42% or the 96%



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2007
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    769

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MaybeMorgan View Post
    Never mind the part about I have never hauled anything-I think I can learn-
    I am determined to get a used horse trailer. and I want/ think I could haul a gooseneck. I first thought I would get a 2-horse but the more I think about it, 3 people is such a good number for trail riding.

    A few months ago I bought a Dodge Ram 2500, gas, 2WD, 2001, 100K+ miles-already had gooseneck and brake controller and was used to haul horses. This is not my primary transportation but it seemed like a good deal. Talked to the previous owner who bought a diesel dually.

    The book says the hauling capacity is 8800 lbs.

    So if a 3-horse is 4800 + 1@1200, 1@1000 = about 8000. Is it too much?
    The book probably indicates the towing/hauling capacity of a "bumper" pull trailer (usually using a hitch bolted to the frame of the truck), not a gooseneck or 5th wheel. Gooseneck/fifth wheel towing capacities usually are much higher, since the kingpin weight of the trailer is directly over the rear axle of the truck. You should be fine.
    Whoever said money can't buy happiness never owned a horse.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun. 15, 2008
    Posts
    739

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by IslandGirl View Post
    The book probably indicates the towing/hauling capacity of a "bumper" pull trailer (usually using a hitch bolted to the frame of the truck), not a gooseneck or 5th wheel. Gooseneck/fifth wheel towing capacities usually are much higher, since the kingpin weight of the trailer is directly over the rear axle of the truck. You should be fine.
    http://dodgeram.info/2001/towing-charts.html#2500
    Disclaimer;
    Nearly all of what I post will be controversial to someone. Believe nothing you read on a chat room, research for yourself and LEARN.
    Not in the 42% or the 96%



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2007
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    769

    Default

    The trailer weighs 4800 pounds; let's assume the weight of two horses is 2,200 lbs. and the weight of three horses is about 3,300 lbs. Let's also assume another 1,000 lbs. of incidental weight (tack, people, supplies, etc.). Totaled up, we're now at 9,000 lbs.

    Kingpin weight is figured on total weight of the trailer and actually is considered "payload" since the weight is directly over the truck's rear axle. Kingpin weight usually is 15% to 20% of the total trailer weight. That means the NET weight she is pulling, fully loaded, is between 1,350 to 1,800 lbs. which is well within the 3,830 lb. payload capacity of her truck. Don't forget that the trailer axles carry a substantial portion of the total trailer weight.
    Whoever said money can't buy happiness never owned a horse.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan. 20, 2007
    Location
    Northern Kentucky
    Posts
    1,097

    Default It's starting to make more sense now!

    Yes, 5.9 engine, Quad cab, long bed.
    I think the previous owner had a 3 horse trailer.
    I kept staring at the chart that 2bee put up a link to, but now it's starting to make sense, because the gooseneck is like a lever, sort of, maybe....thanks for the clear explanation, Island Girl-honestly I just couldn't figure out how anyone could be hauling with less than a semi, after reading all these threads, you know? I still have a hard time seeing how I could have a 500 lbs of stuff but maybe-after I get all the things people say you should carry in a trailer....



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan. 20, 2007
    Location
    Northern Kentucky
    Posts
    1,097

    Default Terrain

    The area is hilly midwest, that is, some flat, no mountains. The farthest I could see going is a couple hundred miles.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb. 17, 2000
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    3,545

    Default

    I have the same type of truck, and pull a 3 horse. One thing I wish I had paid more attention to was the width of the trailer. Mine is extra tall and wide, I wish I had gotten the regular width. Some roads are very narrow.



Similar Threads

  1. Rate to haul horse
    By SuckerForHorses in forum Off Course
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: Jun. 2, 2012, 01:44 AM
  2. What if you can't always haul your horse to the vet?
    By Serigraph in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: Sep. 1, 2010, 09:25 AM
  3. Minimum truck requirements to haul a 4-horse?
    By wannabegifted in forum Off Course
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: Oct. 24, 2008, 01:17 PM
  4. Would you ever haul a horse tacked?
    By arena run in forum Endurance and Trail Riding
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: Nov. 22, 2007, 12:00 PM
  5. Replies: 101
    Last Post: May. 4, 2007, 07:59 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •