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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar. 9, 2006
    Location
    South-Central PA
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    2,323

    Default Any tips for treating seedy toe?

    Just got in a little OTTB gelding with a minor case of seedy toe. Farrier was out and just said to treat it with Fungidye. I've no experience whatsoever with ST.
    Cindy



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov. 4, 2003
    Location
    Dallas, Georgia
    Posts
    17,084

    Default

    Fungidye is effective but I'd be a bit more aggressive and nip it quick. -- A course of Clean Trax or White Lightening is very effective.

    In addition, shorten his trim cycle after treatment so that the white line can be kept uber tight as the hoof wall grows down.
    <>< Sorrow Looks Back. Worry Looks Around. Faith Looks Up! -- Being negative only makes a difficult journey more difficult. You may be given a cactus, but you don't have to sit on it.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep. 12, 2008
    Location
    Chester County, Pa.
    Posts
    186

    Default Hmmmm.......

    I only used "White Ligntening" once and had a horrible reaction. It actualy burnt this horses foot so that stuff was outta here ! ! As I use for Thrush , for Seedy Toe I also use TODAY the stuff for lactating cows. Works everytime, cheap and I always have it my barn supplys. I got mine at TSC.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul. 11, 2004
    Posts
    7,029

    Default

    Clean it and the Koppertox.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct. 19, 2005
    Posts
    7,320

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by EASY RIDER STABLE View Post
    I only used "White Ligntening" once and had a horrible reaction. It actualy burnt this horses foot so that stuff was outta here ! ! As I use for Thrush , for Seedy Toe I also use TODAY the stuff for lactating cows. Works everytime, cheap and I always have it my barn supplys. I got mine at TSC.
    You used it according to instructions?



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct. 18, 2000
    Posts
    22,489

    Default

    Years ago one of my horses had a touch of seedy toe.

    The farrier nipped it in the bud with a good trim, cleaned the area out and packed it with keratex hoof putty.

    No experience with the product you mentioned - but what I liked about the hoof putty is that it kept dirt and grit out of the area.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec. 9, 2005
    Location
    North East, MD
    Posts
    4,356

    Default

    My treatment is to back the toe up so the wall at the point of infection does not bear weight. Then I take a tool I purchased just for this purpose, clean it out as far as it will go, and squirt Thrush Buster in there. Some clients use a small screwdriver that will fit into the opening to follow up on the treatment. Just do it gently.

    In bad cases where there is a large, deep opening, I've applied mastitis treatment and then packed it with a cotton ball. If the owner is diligent about repeating the treatment, it grows out.

    I've also used White Lightening with good success.

    I owned a horse who had nasty seedy toe for years. Farrier would notch above the crack at every trim and have me treat it. It didn't completely go away until I changed farriers and to one who brought his toes back properly. It cleared up and never came back. He stopped stumbling, too. So as a trimmer, I do what my last farrier did and don't see seedy toe in my client horses for longer than it takes to grow the existing crack out.

    The advantage to using Clean Trax or White Lightening is that they work their way up to the source of the infection. Once the baddies are dead, the crack/hole can grow out with proper timming.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul. 2, 2003
    Location
    Woodland, Ca
    Posts
    6,282

    Default

    My farrier once took a horse shoe nail and heated it in his forge, then he used it to burn a hole in the wall of the hoof I then used a syringe to squirt iodine into the hole for about a week... not traditional, but it worked.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec. 9, 2005
    Location
    North East, MD
    Posts
    4,356

    Default

    Yeah, you gotta kill the organisms that are growing up there. A crack is one thing, but black junk means the infection that is causing the crack will likely continue if not treated. But, IME, you also have to take the pressure off the wall at that point to stop any mechanical prying that opens the site up for continued infection. A strong roll on the wall might be enough, or a slight rocker at that part of the toe.

    I'll throw this in even though it might spark an argument: IME, seedy toe starts/continues from having the breakover too far forward. IOW, long toes can open up a route for the infection to set in. Any treatment needs to include bringing the breakover back to the correct point for that hoof, whether shod or barefoot.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan. 7, 2009
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    247

    Default Copper Sulphate.

    Make a bucketful of water/copper sulphate powder mix. Mix in enough to get a deep sky blue colour. Also, get a small pot of vaseline (petroleum jelly) and mix enough c/s to sky blue colour. Then get a stiff brush and scrub the hoof clean. Back up the toe if necessary, and clean out the seedy bit. I use a shoe nail with the tip clipped off, and the end slightly curved and it gets well into the damage. Put the hoof in the bucket and soak, or use a syringe and flush the cavity out or do both. Then push some of the vaseline into the hole and finally pack it well with cotton wool.

    This only needs to be redone every couple of days or if the cotton wool falls out.

    The copper sulphate soak will kill any thrush lurking around the frogs too.

    After using many different products for over 2 years I have finally got rid of a chronic seedy toe and cracked hoof after 5 months of diligent application.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan. 7, 2009
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    247

    Default Matryoshka

    I agree with your long-toed theory. I've learnt to keep my barefooters nice and short and they have no problems. Had a lovely farrier, but he would not take the toes back far and address flares, enough so we got splits and continued re-infections.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar. 9, 2006
    Location
    South-Central PA
    Posts
    2,323

    Default

    I just got this guy in last Friday, and he will automatically go to the 6 week farrier cycle immediately. He suffers from the typical racehorse trim - long toe, low heel syndrome. Other than this tiny bit of seedytoe, he has pretty good feet. I definately want to treat it with something in between farrier visits, but I don't even think the hole is large enough to pack any cotton into. Not even a cotton ball would fit in there (and that's AFTER the farrier cut it away). I still don't want to let it get any worse, but just wasn't sure what the best product was to kill that specific type of bacteria. Unfortunately/fortunately he's on daily turnout, but unfortunately/fortunately the ground in my area is very soft (i.e. muddy). I don't want to risk killing any of the healthy hoof tissue, so I'm concerned about using something TOO caustic.
    Cindy



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov. 4, 2003
    Location
    Dallas, Georgia
    Posts
    17,084

    Default

    Forgot about this....

    Since it's just starting, Banixx (www.banixx) is great. Non-caustic, anti-fungal, anti-bacterial. KV Vet.com has the gel formula which would be good for packing.

    I'd scrub the hoof/hole in Nolvasan Surgical Solution and then dry with a blow dryer. Smear the gel in there, wrap with vet wrap and some duct tape or apply a boot/HoofWrap. Turn out where it's relatively dry.

    If he's bare right now, see if you can rasp/roll the toe in between farrier visits. Since you already know he has classic LT/LH syndrome, help your farrier and horse to get those toes back where they belong. Plus it will go far towards keeping the white line tight as it grows down.
    <>< Sorrow Looks Back. Worry Looks Around. Faith Looks Up! -- Being negative only makes a difficult journey more difficult. You may be given a cactus, but you don't have to sit on it.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2001
    Posts
    15,232

    Default

    Another believer in the long toe theory.



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