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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov. 28, 2006
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    Transitioning
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    618

    Default Treating thrush w/o soaking

    My retired guy was out for 2 days after the snow/ice finally melted. I knew it was muddy but I figured he'd be fine. Day 3 (today) I clean him up and his frog is destroyed! It split down the middle and I'm assuming its bad thrush from the mud. I put some hydrogen peroxide and coppertox on it tonight but I obviously want to treat it more aggressively

    Problem- he won't stand to have his foot soaked. I've tried everything and he just freaks out and all of the sudden buckets and cross ties and hoof picks go everywhere!!!

    What do you guys suggest? I can keep him in if I have too, but I really don't want to do anti-biotics (he's got a sensitive gut)



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2007
    Location
    NW Louisiana
    Posts
    5,265

    Default

    I use Hoof Heal, and if its a stubborn case I add an ounce bottle of tea tree oil to it. Once or twice a day should clear it up. Since its an oil, it does help keep the mud and manure from having too much contact with the frog. And it doesn't dry the hoof out like Koppertox does. Or stain everything it touches.

    I read an article about 2 years ago, I cannot remember in what magazine. They compared the common thrush treatments (Koppertox, ThrushBuster, Absorbine, Hoof Heal, cannot remember the rest) and Hoof Heal came out ahead of the rest.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2002
    Location
    West Coast of Michigan
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    36,321

    Default

    Never soaked a thrushy hoof in my life--making it MORE wet seems counterintuitive to me.

    I would NEVER use systemic antibiotics to treat thrush, unless the foot was very obviously getting very, very bad with heat, drainage, etc.

    Keep the foot DRY, maybe puff some Wonder Dust in there? I've never had a case of thrush that didn't respond to a few squirts of bleach, but this sounds like it's above and beyond that point.
    Click here before you buy.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov. 28, 2006
    Location
    Transitioning
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    618

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by deltawave View Post
    Never soaked a thrushy hoof in my life--making it MORE wet seems counterintuitive to me.

    I would NEVER use systemic antibiotics to treat thrush, unless the foot was very obviously getting very, very bad with heat, drainage, etc.

    Keep the foot DRY, maybe puff some Wonder Dust in there? I've never had a case of thrush that didn't respond to a few squirts of bleach, but this sounds like it's above and beyond that point.
    Agree! My vets always tell me to soak it in salts and then pack it, they have tried to prescribe antibiotics but I just don't think his system can handle that AND I don't see what good it would do.

    I figure I can hose it off because of the mud and grossness but I agree it should be dry.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb. 13, 2005
    Location
    Columbus, OH
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    6,867

    Default

    Sounds like you have thrush of the central sulcus (Google it for pictures if you like). I went through this last spring with the mud.

    Your best bet is either cow mastitis cream (Tomorrow or Today, try Tractor Supply or your feed store) or a 50/50 athlete's foot cream and neosporin. Apply via dosing syringe at least once daily as deep into the crack as you can get it. If the crack is small enough, pack in an iodine-soaked cotton round with a hoof pick. That will fall out eventually as the horse walks around, but that's okay--thrush is caused by anaerobic organisms, so spending some time airing out between rounds of killing-you chemicals is useful.
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  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov. 22, 2005
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    1,666

    Default

    A salt/water mix helped clear up a bad case of thrush for me. Twice a day treatments-used a syringe to get it up into the cleft



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov. 22, 2007
    Location
    Port Charlotte, FL
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    3,447

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    If there is a deep split in the central sulcus of the frog, the infection has begun to work its way into the sensative frog and could reach as far as the digital cushion.

    I'll let y'all in on a little secret that some of us have accidently discovered. The "latest and greatest" treatment that I see getting the quickest results with this kind of deep central sulcus trush is squirting an antibiotic ointment directly into the deep cleft.

    "Today" from Fort Dodge Labs is readily available OTC at many farm supply outlets. This antibiotic ointment is supposed to be for treating mastitis in lactating cows. It comes in a syrnge with a soft plastic "needle."

    Lately a lot of farriers and vets have begun to use this and similar "mastitis treatment" products for treating deep sulcus thrush.

    The syringe allows the antibiotic to be injected directly into the cleft. Any gunk that is up inside the cleft is displaced and pushed out by the antibiotic. Usually treating the sulcus twice daily for 3 days is enough to get 'er done.

    It's fast, easy, cheap, requires no soaking, does not burn sensative tissue . . . what's not to like about it?



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep. 6, 2000
    Location
    Decatur, GA
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    2,568

    Default

    I have been battling thrush for months with a rescue mare. No one quite understand what you are up against until they have done it themselves. I have tried everything. I just bought some White Lightening Friday and I will see how it does. It is not supposed to damage tissues but you do have to let the fumes stay on the foot for awhile. So, after some investigation, here are my plans. I am going to pour onto hoof and into cleft. Then soak a pad of cotton and put it on the sole of the foot. Then a piece of duct tape to secure cotton. Then a plastic bag over foot (as small as possible to avoid horsey heart attack) and tape at top to capture fumes. I think 20 minutes is sufficient. My fingers are crossed! I also moved my girl to a new barn yesterday with much better footing, and much more room to move. I'll update you when I get in the White Lightening. I have had the best luck so far with athlete's foot cream and Neosporin mixed and pushed into cleft with cotton ball and left in and Wonder Dust on hoof and scraped down into all nooks and crannies. I will continue with the Wonder Dust after other treatment for maintenance. It is really a fantastic drug (very natural in many ways). Good luck.
    “If you are irritated by every rub, how will your mirror be polished?”
    ? Rumi



  9. #9
    Join Date
    May. 16, 2007
    Posts
    1,124

    Default

    I use the Fort Dodge Tomorrow instead of their Today.

    It is recommended for a "dry" cow (not currently producing milk) and has a bit more of the active ingredient than Today and it is made to be time released.

    http://www.valleyvet.com/ct_detail.h...2-00b0d0204ae5

    "ToMORROW (cephapirin benzathine) provides bactericidal levels of the active antibiotic, cephapirin, for a prolonged period of time. This prolonged activity is due to the low solubility of the cephapirin benzathine and to the slow release gel base.

    Cephapirin is bactericidal to susceptible organisms; it is known to be highly active against Streptococcus agalactiae and Staphylococcus aureus including strains resistant to penicillin."


    If i were you i would just pick out the hoof and then brush debris off the best you can. If you felt you really had to wash (not soak) the hoof, i would dry it off with a towel and then let the horse stay in the stall for however long it takes for the hoof to be bone dry. (i use a hair dryer) Once the hoof is dry, squirt some Tommorow into the crevice. It comes in a little syringe that lets you direct the Tomorrow right into the crevice. Great stuff. It is way more liquid than gel so dont be surprised the first time you use it. I can't say enough good things about this stuff.

    Since this is off label use of the Tomorrow, there will be no equine thrush instructions provided. So you will have to play it by ear. Maybe use it daily for the first several days, then maybe twice a week for a bit until that frog tightens up.

    You didnt say how many hooves were involved. Just one ?



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar. 8, 2004
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
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    Default

    As an aside, lots of the sites were saying they are out of Tomorrow indefinitely due to a stoppage in production from the manufacturer. Not sure if that is the same for Today or not. If you want Tomorrow snap it up while you can.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    May. 16, 2007
    Posts
    1,124

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    I'll bet it has something to do with the peanut recall since "Each 10 mL disposable syringe contains 300 mg of cephapirin activity in a stable peanut oil gel. This product was manufactured by a non-sterilizing process."



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct. 19, 2005
    Posts
    7,320

    Default

    You could also try Pete Ramey's recipe or Tomorrow's Dry Cow , which apparently some posters here have found to be very effective. I would also treat this from the inside out - make sure your horse is on a low NSC diet and gets enough copper and zinc - see here: http://www.hoofrehab.com/diet.htm



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep. 25, 2007
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    440

    Default

    I was battling thrush with my guy for a while. Somewhere, I read that people were using Athlete's Foot Cream. I went to get some and saw it in a handy aerosal spray. It's a miracle! I love it! I keep a can in my tack locker all the time now. I picked my guys feet and really brushed EVERYTHING out and off of his hoof. Then sprayed along the edges of the frog and down into the cleft. A few days later, the thrush was gone and the frog was no longer mushy and stinky. I would recommend this to anyone.

    As a word of caution, when you spray it on it makes a crackling noise, similar to what you hear when you pour hydrogen peroxide onto a cut, it bubbles a little bit. It freaked me out the first time I did it, but it's just cleaning stuff out and doing it's job!



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jul. 20, 2004
    Posts
    1,821

    Default

    Mycaseptic E is the best stuff I've ever used for thrush.

    I never had thrush issues until I inherited my rescues, and they came with deep central sulcus thrush, crevices in the frogs, etc. Nasty mess. I initially used tomorrow at the suggestion of my farrier, and it does work too, but nothing is faster, easier, or cheaper than Mycaseptic E. Non-caustic, will not kill living tissue (key, since thrush is a fungus that lives on necrotic tissue). No soaking or pre-cleaning necessary for results, which is also key since how many horse owners are actually going to be compliant with a 10-step thrush routine? :-)



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar. 15, 2006
    Posts
    320

    Default

    Another vote her for the Today/Tomorrow! When I got my gelding back from the free lease from hell he had the worst thrush I have ever seen (to the point where he stopped using that foot completely) and this cleared it up within a matter of days- and it's very user friendly. I just squirted some in and packed with gauze - no wrapping - they'll stay in for a bit and then fall out.

    I'm not sure which product I used (it's at the barn and it's been months so I can't remember right now)... I *think* it was the Today... but basically tubes of pen and soybean oil. Don't know if that makes a difference as maybe only the one with the peanut oil has been pulled off the shelves.



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