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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec. 14, 2008
    Posts
    39

    Default Import vs. Local

    As previously mentioned, I'm in the search for a new horse... It used to be fun, but now I'm a little frusterated about finding the right horse at the right price. So now, I'm thinking about Europe...

    In the end, which would get me the most 'bang for my buck?' What are the pros and cons of each? If you've imported, did you go with an agent? Would you do anything differently? Share your experience?
    I'm looking for an FEI Schoolmaster. Which, in your opinion, would be the best way to go?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan. 1, 2005
    Posts
    1,015

    Default

    have never imported , but what i can say.. is that friends that have, & even with a good vet check have had previous issues come up that were not found or discussed before import.. language problem .. maybe ..

    I would think the cost for transport from coast to coast and your travel and visit would still be much more reasonable in costs then across the oceans..

    good luck .. your horse will be found..

    P~



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2005
    Location
    Northeast
    Posts
    10,806

    Cool

    Iwould think, that by the time you add up the expenses of importing and quarantine, along with finding a horse over there. You would do better to stay home.

    Patience is important when looking for horses. Now that I neither need nor want another , prospects keep appearing.

    The old saying "Marry in haste, repent at leisure", applies to horse purchases also, just change a few words.
    Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun. 12, 2007
    Location
    CT
    Posts
    5,993

    Default

    If I was purchasing a schoolmaster, instead of something green or something for a pro, I would think that suitability and 'clicking' would top the list of wants. I would want to ride it a few times, maybe even take it on trial or try it at a show that it is scheduled to be at so I can see how it is away from home. I wouldn't hesitate to import a baby, or a pro's horse, or something you expect to have to put time into, or something intended for resale, but a schoolmaster is what he is- and to me it takes more than one ride or one weekend to see if its a good fit.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan. 29, 2002
    Posts
    1,649

    Default

    I would want to ride it a few times, maybe even take it on trial or try it at a show that it is scheduled to be at so I can see how it is away from home.
    Agree. When you buy in Europe, you can't check out the horse's background and vet records like you can in the USA. Also, I think there are all kinds of middle-men commissions getting tacked on to the European imports.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr. 19, 2004
    Location
    Sebastopol CA USA
    Posts
    115

    Default Import vs. Local

    I have imported many horses and I have bought US horses and bred and trained my own horses to the top levels of dressage. To buy a school master I believe your best horse for the $ is in the US. Why, because in the US the only people that buy horses are Americans. Most Americans do not value dressage schoolmasters. Vs in Europe, they do value schoolmasters and they also have multiple country's looking to buy the same horses. In the US we only have other Americans. As much as we would like to think the market is good in the US to sell a horse, we are wrong. Other country's buy from Holland and Germany, because they win at the shows. They breed many more horses for the sport and they also have many more top riders to bring horses along. They also have a lot more people like you looking to buy the same horse. It really comes down to supply and demand. We now have a good sized supply and not much demand.
    Good luck, with where ever you search.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb. 3, 2008
    Location
    IL
    Posts
    202

    Default

    I have done both, and both times I was happy with my decision. In both instances, I worked with someone I trusted and had a great reputation. One was local, the other in Europe.

    Good luck to you!



  8. #8
    Other One Guest

    Default Import vs local

    With the dollar weaker the advantage to shopping in Denmark where I take buyers is still geography and numbers.Dk has more good horses within much shorter distances Germany or Holland.With young horses one can see freeschooling and then chose which are to be seen under saddle we have averaged 115 to 120 in an average 5 day trip.How long will it take to see that many good ones here at home?



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct. 21, 2003
    Posts
    8,695

    Default

    Every single person I know that has imported a schoolmaster type from Europe has brought them to the US only to find many many soundness issues, and experienced nothing but heartache.

    It's worse odds than playing lotto IMHO. You would do well to have patience, and find something already stateside with a verifiable history.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct. 10, 2007
    Location
    down south
    Posts
    5,060

    Default

    Buyer Beware!! Make sure you have a really great trainer (not just in your own mind) that will go with you and help and someone that can speak the language that you trust also.
    Horses aren't our whole life, but makes our life whole



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec. 16, 2003
    Location
    Staunton, VA, USA
    Posts
    2,489

    Default I have done both as well.

    I have both imported and bought USA breds. You do have to be careful in both cases.
    But that said there are a lot more schoolmasters in Europe than there are here so you get a wider choice.
    But take a trainer who knows you and how you ride, and have the horse well vetted.
    My current guy came from Denmark and I have nothing but good to say abot the experience of buying horses in Denmark. Nice people easy to deal with, horses were honestly represented. I've bought 6 horses from there in the past 3 years and all of them have been just what I was told they were.

    I cannot say the same for buying in Germany! I wouldn't even think about Holland, sorry guys, I just have seen too many fast operators that are Dutch. I'm sure that there are wonderful honest straightforward horse agents in Holland and Germany but I have yet to meet one.

    SO I'd say, make sure you have a good reputable agent, ask for references and follow them up.
    Yours
    MW
    Melyni (PhD) PAS, Dipl. ACAN.
    Sign up for the Equine nutrition enewsletter on www.foxdenequine.com
    New edition of book is out:
    Horse Nutrition Handbook.

    www.knabstruppers4usa.com



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan. 26, 2009
    Posts
    111

    Default

    I am also in the market for a new horse - as well as trying to sell my current PSG horse. He is a bit more than I want considering my age!

    My criteria: Safe, good rideability, good mind, competitive in regional dressage shows currently 1st level with potential to be competitive 3rd level; safe on trails; budget: $35,000.

    So far, I've had no luck in finding such a horse. I have imported two, bought three others in the US. No thoughts on that preference. I've had good and bad experiences with both.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct. 20, 2008
    Posts
    66

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rabicon View Post
    Buyer Beware!! Make sure you have a really great trainer (not just in your own mind) that will go with you and help and someone that can speak the language that you trust also.
    Best advice! There is no protection for a US buyer overseas. I know many people who have purchased horses in Germany and Holland, and so many things not disclosed. Vet checks are useless UNLESS you have all the files sent to your vet in the US, otherwise, realize the overseas vets are taking care of their clients NOT any U.S. citizen. Every person I know who imported a horse EXCEPT those who are big name trainers has been ripped off. So unless you have a big name trainer (and that means, big enough name so he/she is known in Germany or Holland) to represent you, be extra, extra, extra careful.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb. 3, 2008
    Location
    IL
    Posts
    202

    Default

    Again- Agreed, if looking overseas work with someone you trust! Try working with an American that lives and trains there. They know the language, the in's and outs, they have their own network of trusted business associates.

    Off the top of my head-

    Denmark- Heather Blitz
    Germany- Catherine Haddad

    Can't think of an American in Holland, but do have friends that have imported a dozen or so from a trusted contact in Holland for the last 7 years or so.

    PM me if you would like me to attempt to get that contact information.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct. 26, 2006
    Posts
    426

    Default

    I do have a trainer here that is German and even though I got seriously burned on my imported from Germany GP mare I would trust one of these guys to select one for me or help me select one and I swore I would never by overseas again.

    Let me know if you want any help at all.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2004
    Location
    Houston, Tx
    Posts
    1,028

    Default

    I think your budget is key in making your decision. You can get a school master here in the US pretty easily with any soundness issues disclosed and a verifible show history.
    But it will cost you more than 35K for a PSG horse (as an example).

    On the other hand, you can probably by a horse with the description of what you want in Europe for that price, but will you have the other things I mentioned? Depends on how good your agent is. It's much harder to return a horse that is a problem if you buy in Europe.

    Lastly, I will say in my experience (buying abroad and here) - with some exceptions you get what you pay for. If a horse is cheap - find out why!

    I have certainly sold horses for under market value, but have had a good reason why I let them go for cheaper, and explained that reason.

    Good Luck!



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