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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug. 1, 2003
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    Georgia.
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    Question Waxy Finish on New Bridle

    Do all new bridles come with the wax stuff on them? What is the best way to remove it? My new bridle doesn't appear waxy but I want to care for it properly before I start oiling the heck out of it to darken it.

    T.I.A.



  2. #2
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    Jul. 27, 2007
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    The head trainer at my daughter's riding school suggested washing it lightly with ivory dish soap before the first oiling.



  3. #3
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    Jul. 2, 2003
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    Woodland, Ca
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    Clean with Castile soap, oil, apply glycerine soap.



  4. #4
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    Sep. 14, 2000
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    Ammonia and water, or straight ammonia to get the wax off, followed by warm neatsfoot oil and then finish with glycerine soap on a nearly dry sponge.
    Laurie
    Finding, preparing, showing and training young hunters, in hand and performance.
    www.juniorjohnsontrainingandsales.com



  5. #5
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    Jan. 9, 2006
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    the land of sky-blue waters
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    If it's high-quality vegetable-tanned leather, that "wax" (also called "bloom") is the excess fats from the tanning process coming out of the leather. I'd work it back in with bare hands as much as possible, then clean and condition as normal. Stripping it off with ammonia is way too harsh for good new leather.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep. 23, 2000
    Location
    Middleburg, VA USA
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    305

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    When you oil it the oil will dissolve it. Anything chemical based will not be good for the leather anyway.



  7. #7
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    Sep. 14, 2000
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    Goochland, VA
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    No, it is not. I've listened to that "rub it back in" stuff for years, and it isn't true. The leather won't absorb oil until you get the waxiness off. Period. I've been stripping it off for 30+ years and have yet to ruin a bridle. You will be perfectly fine removing it with whatever method as long as you then oil and condition the leather.
    Laurie
    Finding, preparing, showing and training young hunters, in hand and performance.
    www.juniorjohnsontrainingandsales.com



  8. #8
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    Jan. 9, 2006
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    the land of sky-blue waters
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    And I've never had a problem with leather not absorbing oil after the bloom was rubbed back in with bare hands.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 1999
    Location
    Holland Township, NJ
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    2,699

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dad Said Not To View Post
    And I've never had a problem with leather not absorbing oil after the bloom was rubbed back in with bare hands.

    Me either, after 25 years.

    OP, PLEASE, if you like this bridle, DON"T "oil the heck out of it to darken it". That's worse than stripping it to remove the bloom.

    Rubb in the bloom, then use the bridle. Clean it in a normal matter with something MADE for tack, then condition it LIGHTLY once or twice a week TOPs until it gets to the color you like. I like Leather Therapy Wash to clean and Passier Lederbalsam to condition.

    Take it easy with the oils. You know what happens to tack that gets the holy crap oiled out of it? It falls apart. It gets sticky and nasty, and no matter how much you try, you can never get that sticky nasty goo soaped off. I've seen $300+ bridles destroyed in a year or two by this treatment. There is NO reason a quality bridle shouldn't last 20 years.

    I never understand why people buy light colored tack and then darken it. Why not just buy it in Havanna to start with??



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug. 1, 2003
    Location
    Georgia.
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Pat View Post
    Me either, after 25 years.

    OP, PLEASE, if you like this bridle, DON"T "oil the heck out of it to darken it". That's worse than stripping it to remove the bloom.

    Rubb in the bloom, then use the bridle. Clean it in a normal matter with something MADE for tack, then condition it LIGHTLY once or twice a week TOPs until it gets to the color you like. I like Leather Therapy Wash to clean and Passier Lederbalsam to condition.

    Take it easy with the oils. You know what happens to tack that gets the holy crap oiled out of it? It falls apart. It gets sticky and nasty, and no matter how much you try, you can never get that sticky nasty goo soaped off. I've seen $300+ bridles destroyed in a year or two by this treatment. There is NO reason a quality bridle shouldn't last 20 years.

    I never understand why people buy light colored tack and then darken it. Why not just buy it in Havanna to start with??
    Unfortunately the bridle is much lighter than I thought it would be but it was on an internet sale and an excellent deal!!! I plan on using the bridle only for showing so I will not be using on an everyday basis. I hope to have it darker by the time I go to a show in March. (I'm showing this wekeend but will use my other bridle for this weekend). I don't want to ruin it but it has to be darker since my horse is looks black right now with his winter coat.

    From what I can tell, the bridle doesn't feel waxy but I haven't had a new bridle in eons so I'm not sure if all new bridles have a waxy finish on them.



  11. #11
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    Jan. 9, 2006
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    the land of sky-blue waters
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    Try Hydrophane darkening oil, used sparingly. If that doesn't look like it will get the bridle as dark as you want it without over-oiling, I've also successfully used a little bit of leather dye mixed with oil (I used Leather Therapy, but I'm betting you could use whatever leather oil you prefer). A little goes a long way-- the less dye you use, the easier it is to keep it from looking blotchy.



  12. #12
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    Feb. 9, 2006
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    Why on earth would you oil a bridle nowadays? In the good old days, harsh treatment in the tanning process saw hides that were treated with terribly toxic chemicals, but that whole game went out with the dodo, fortunately.

    Just condition it gently but regularly with a decent modern conditioner, such as Effax Leather Balsam, etc, and I promise you, the wax will disappear, it will darken down nice and evenly after half a dozen treatments, and you won't wreck the bridle in the process.

    Oil rots the thread (unless it's manmade), and makes the leather sag and stretch, until it's literally saturated and exhausted: don't oil it!



  13. #13
    Join Date
    May. 28, 2008
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    I got a lovely Crosby bridle with a thick wax coat a couple years back. To get the wax off, I rigged up a hairdryer and turned it on to low. Then I held the bridle underneath and rubbed off the wax with a damp cloth. Afterwards I conditioned it and then used it for a couple weeks, cleaning it as normal, before retiring it to the 'show bridle' role. It is important, even with a bridle you plan only to show in, to break it in and get some dirt on it. With dirt and good conditioning your lighter bridle should darken well - I like Lederbalsam as a conditioner, as it did wonderful things for my bridles and saddle.
    http://www.chronicleofmyhorse.com/profile/Ashley26

    "You keep one leg on one side, the other leg on the other side, and your mind in the middle." -- Henry Taylor, "Riding Lesson"



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