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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug. 26, 2003
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    The good 'ole State of denial
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    5,065

    Default For those who have wooded acreage

    Tell me what you have done with it

    We have probably 2.5-3 acres of pricker bushes and trees that we have very very slowly been clearing out (have a bush hog on the tractor, and a walk behind for areas we can't get the Deere).

    I want some to be in the horses turn-out/pasture area and the rest make a small XC course out of.

    My question is maintenance, and how to go about the whole thing. We have a small area stripped of brush that we could put the horses on now. The rest I've been mowing down with the push hog b/c we can't get the tractor over the creek. It's a slow process and we have winter on our side, but I've noticed a lot of the areas end up pushed down vs cut/shredded. My fear......spring. Prickers come alive and grow faster than I can possibly keep up with. My question...if we put the horses on there once we get the majority of the brush flattened, will they help keep it maintained (aka tramp it down) when things start growing again?

    I've thought about goats, but I really don't want more animals to care for, plus we would need special fencing to keep them in (we have coated hot wire - Ramm).

    So for those of you that have horses on wooded areas, do they keep it cleared? For those of you that have cleared areas, how did you do it, did it last, what kind of maintenance, etc.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep. 17, 2003
    Location
    Fort Myers, Florida
    Posts
    2,667

    Default

    Well, goats would really do the trick and you could use them seasonally from a goat person probably....think about getting the fencing reworked.

    Not something everyone would do..but my friend who is away 6 mos and home again has land covered with those sticker burrs ..ugh...she also has a pet cow that a farmer keeps for her and brings home when she's here. Old MooMoo clears them right out. hehe
    "My treasures do not sparkle or glitter, they shine in the sunlight and nicker to me in the night"



  3. #3

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    We have 4 pastures with wooded areas in them ranging from 9 acres to about 60 acres. We cut alot for lumber and fire wood, have cleared some areas after the trees were cut down we bulldozed out the larger stupms and dug a few. Went in with a brush disk and worked the ground up then seeded to clover and grasses for pasture. Most land thats wooded around here is more valuable then pasture land for logging and fire wood also sells much higher for hunting land.
    Quality doesn\'t cost it pays.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar. 11, 2006
    Location
    South of the Mason-Dixon Line
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    2,321

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by birdsong View Post
    Well, goats would really do the trick and you could use them seasonally from a goat person probably
    Pigs will eat and root up anything in their path and quickly learn to respect a single hot wire. They are easy to care for and a plus is that you can eat them, if you are so inclined, when they are grown. We just raised two for consumption and the difference in taste is amazing.

    Anyway...we have 28 wooded acres that we want to start clearing to eventually put in more pasture. We plan on putting up movable "paddocks" with hot wire and letting two pigs have at it. When one area is cleared they will be moved on to the next. When a few acres are brush free, we will then cut the trees and remove stumps.
    Ridge Farm Inc.-full care retirement
    http://www.horseretirementfarm.com



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul. 20, 2007
    Location
    Rising Sun, MD
    Posts
    5,126

    Default

    I have 6 acres of woods and brush- Honestly I only cleared the path where I put the fence- and then I turned them out. They were way better brush hogs than any goats I've ever had- They're paddocks are completely clear now. And for those that are worried my horses ate weird things- I did go thru to make sure there weren't toxic plants in there and they always hay available.
    I'm good at being uncomfortable so I can't stop changing all the time -Fiona Apple, Extraordinary Machine
    If I were your appendages, I'd hold open your eyes so you would see- Incubus



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug. 26, 2003
    Location
    The good 'ole State of denial
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    5,065

    Default

    County, do your horses ever go in the woods? Both our fields have pasture, so I figured they would probably stick with the grass and avoid the wooded area.

    Tabula, was it dense? I'm talking THICK under brush here, and 95% of that has prickers. If I thought they would keep it tramped down, I'd have no problem extending their pasture and giving them access to it, but we fenced it off because we were afraid they might get hurt in there.

    I guess I've always had horses that would find things to stab themselves with, so try not to give them the opportunity. But it kills me to have that land and it's basically useless at the moment, and I am 100% sure I won't be able to keep up with the brush clearing this spring without some help either eating it or tramping it down. Most of it is across the creek and I'm using essentially a beefed up lawn mower. It would be different if we could get the loader and bush hog back there....



  7. #7

    Default

    Oh ya are horses go through the woods all the time they use the deer trails and just make them bigger. If you turn them in the wooded area early in the year they do a better job of eating things down. But the cattle are better at it by far.
    Quality doesn\'t cost it pays.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2005
    Location
    Ocala, FL
    Posts
    2,443

    Default

    What about horses eating the bark from the trees? I have a 3 A pasture with a small area of woods... last year a mule taught my filly to strip the bark off the trees and eat it... now the woods area is hot wired off.... I tried everything to break the habit except the supplement quitt".. No luck... they just pulled the chicken wire down, and I think they enjoyed the hot wauce!

    So now, as I look at the back 2 acres of forest, planned to be another paddock, I am having second thoughts.

    L



  9. #9

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    In 40 years of owning 100's of horses and a couple mules I've never had even one eat bark. I think they do it either out of boredom or lack of a mineral in their diet. We have lots of trees and they never even rub on them.
    Quality doesn\'t cost it pays.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul. 20, 2007
    Location
    Rising Sun, MD
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    5,126

    Default

    [QUOTE=okggo;3822862]

    Tabula, was it dense? I'm talking THICK under brush here, and 95% of that has prickers. If I thought they would keep it tramped down, I'd have no problem extending their pasture and giving them access to it, but we fenced it off because we were afraid they might get hurt in there.

    [QUOTE]


    Yeah, there was some pretty dense stuff in there, downed trees, briars, etc, but I have not had a single issue (knock on wood).

    [QUOTE]What about horses eating the bark from the trees? I have a 3 A pasture with a small area of woods... last year a mule taught my filly to strip the bark off the trees and eat it... now the woods area is hot wired off.... I tried everything to break the habit except the supplement quitt".. No luck... they just pulled the chicken wire down, and I think they enjoyed the hot wauce! [QUOTE]

    And, yes, they eat the bark, but since we are planning to take the trees down anyway, I wasn't too worried.
    I'm good at being uncomfortable so I can't stop changing all the time -Fiona Apple, Extraordinary Machine
    If I were your appendages, I'd hold open your eyes so you would see- Incubus



  11. #11

    Default

    I know of two horses that died of colic that had tree bark packed in their stomach.
    Quality doesn\'t cost it pays.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb. 16, 2003
    Location
    MI USA
    Posts
    8,977

    Default

    I would put cows inside the woods area, let them clean out for me. They do an excellent job, really no trouble if you have good fence. Get more than one cow, so they can be a herd. You probably want to feed them some hay as well, brush may not be real nutritious. Cows will walk out and browse, even with hay, which is what you want. Our neighbor had cattle thru his woods, looks like a park. Mowed smooth, no brush at all, just trees. Cows trimmed trees up as high as they could reach, so you can see thru nicely. Maybe you could rent or borrow some young cattle, no big money for you to spend on them.

    Cows or cattle, do drink a LOT of water. More than horses who are larger. Make sure they have plenty of water at all times.

    Cleaning woods the first time by hand, is hard and time consuming. I have had pretty good luck keeping mine clear in the sunny areas, with the weed whacker. Mow all the green stuff monthly, so whatever it is, can't set seeds. Monthly, keeps regrowth managable to mow fast. So no thistles, no foxtails, no grapevines, honeysuckle bushes. I sprayed the poison ivy bi-weekly, until was gone. Start spraying real early in season, ivy leaves get waxy and shed the spray later. Get an ivy sprout now and again, spray it, so no ivy in there now. In more dense shade areas, the brush is very small all summer, just get saplings growing and not many of them. Brush or growth is not really a problem between the shaded trees, so not mowed.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct. 18, 2000
    Posts
    22,498

    Default

    [QUOTE=okggo;3822862
    Tabula, was it dense? I'm talking THICK under brush here, and 95% of that has prickers. If I thought they would keep it tramped down, I'd have no problem extending their pasture and giving them access to it, but we fenced it off because we were afraid they might get hurt in there.
    [/QUOTE]


    Most of my land is bottomland. And I'm in the South. It's basically hardwoods with brush, foxgrape, greenbriar.

    Goats will make very fast work of the underbrush; enough that you can get in there with the tractor and clear out what's left.

    But find a goat herder - if you just get one or two goats and you have many acres to clear it will never happen. Get a herd in there - mow it down - get 'em out. Put the pigs in - have 'em turn it - get 'em out.

    Or just stick with the goats and not worry about the pigs.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jul. 14, 2003
    Location
    Rhode Island
    Posts
    1,850

    Default

    We have almost 6 acres and have been slowly clearing it over the years. I now have 4 areas fenced . We have one more section that needs to be cleared and fenced. We've only had a tractor for about 5 years, but it's amazing how much we've been able to do in that time. Prior to that we'd have someone in with a brush cutter and we'd get any trees down to get the sun in. Once we fenced an area, our goats would take over and you'd be amazed how fast they can take care of weeds and brush. In the newest area we have stinging nettle that I have to weed wack a few times a season. The patch is getting smaller, and once it's cut and dries, the goats snap it up. Our area is mostly brush, pine and some hardwood, and old apple trees. good luck- I suggest the goat, too. they do take some care, but worth it.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2005
    Location
    Ocala, FL
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    2,443

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by county View Post
    In 40 years of owning 100's of horses and a couple mules I've never had even one eat bark. I think they do it either out of boredom or lack of a mineral in their diet. We have lots of trees and they never even rub on them.
    Well, they get quality food (seminole brand,senior and ultra dynamix), salt, and lots of hay (coastal and O/A), and the older gelding gets a joint supplement. Here in Florida the pasture is grazable year round. I tried a mineral supplement (source) to no effect. I think they are looking for the sweet sap under the bark - I find tooth marks on the stripped areas. They go for the elms and hickory.... pretty much leave the oaks alone, but not entirely.

    any suggestions?
    L



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2006
    Location
    The rocky part of KY
    Posts
    11,513

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    Quote Originally Posted by theoldgreymare View Post
    Pigs will eat and root up anything in their path and quickly learn to respect a single hot wire. They are easy to care for and a plus is that you can eat them, if you are so inclined, when they are grown. We just raised two for consumption and the difference in taste is amazing.

    Anyway...we have 28 wooded acres that we want to start clearing to eventually put in more pasture. We plan on putting up movable "paddocks" with hot wire and letting two pigs have at it. When one area is cleared they will be moved on to the next. When a few acres are brush free, we will then cut the trees and remove stumps.
    DH intends to do the same, on a smaller scale.
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
    Incredible Invisible



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Aug. 26, 2003
    Location
    The good 'ole State of denial
    Posts
    5,065

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    Suggestions on fencing for goats? I don't want to spend a fortune putting no-climb on 2 acres of woods. We have the horses fenced with the coated hot wire from Ramm. Because this area is pretty impossible to get to, and we are doing the fencing ourselves, it has to be metal t-posts with the occasional braced/cemented corner post. We can't get the tractor or the post hole digger back there, as there is a fairly large and deep creek spanning the whole perimeter.

    No idea how to find animals to borrow. I'd feel odd going up to the local cow farm and asking if I could borrow a couple....

    What is the best, goats, pigs or cows? Regardless the horses are going to hate me for even thinking about this...



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jul. 14, 2003
    Location
    Rhode Island
    Posts
    1,850

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    We have 4' woven livestock fencing with a top and mid "hot wire". We did all the fencing ourselves and before the tractor, we ( MR CB/TB) dug all the post holes ourselves with a manual post hole digger. Wooden posts for corners and mid sections and T posts with caps in between. We built stone walls with all the rocks we dug up, and some were so big we had to bury them, rather than pull them out. If you can clear a path for the fencing it's not too bad. We used a come along to stretch the fencing . It is a lot of work, but now I have fencing for whatever I want to contain. I also like the livstock( or horse) fencing because it keeps things OUT as well as in, and it might be possible for a single strand of whatever to break, but , unless a tree fell on it, the woven fence probably would be OK , even if partially down until you fixed it. Anyway, that's what we did and we have one more section to clear and fence. We live on a busy road, so I don't want any chance of my guys getting out.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2006
    Location
    The rocky part of KY
    Posts
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    There is actually a goat sized mesh, 4" x 4". It is less expensive by far than diamond mesh or 2x4 no-climb. I don't know whether it is suitable for horses, I worry about shoes getting caught with that size. Goats will climb up on anything and get over the fence, or under it, or through the little gap between the gate and the fence. So rock walls aren't so good for keeping em in. What I've been told is that goats are the high weed mowers - they are browsers and eat all the bushes. Pigs are the rototillers, they root and disturb the earth. We have a drainage in the back that the little 4x can get past, but DH feels real iffy about the tractor, so he is contemplating livestock to do the work and provide food or a little income.
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
    Incredible Invisible



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jul. 14, 2003
    Location
    Rhode Island
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    ReSomething, you're right about fencing. I have one goat that can clear a stall door. Our stoneworks are within the fencing- just a place to put the rocks we dig up, and give the goats something to play on. When this goat came,, as part of a pair, we were advised she was a jumper. We added a higher hot wire and , don't laugh, hung soda cans off of that with wire. It worked. I have only one spot that she can clear and it's inside the fencing anyway. She climbs onto a rock then jumps hot wire and fencing, but it just goes into the main pasture area. Luckily, being herd animals, if one did get out, she'd probably stay within sight of the rest. Plus, my horse seems to "count noses" periodically during the day and goes on a hunt of she's one short.



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