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  1. #1
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    Sep. 5, 2005
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    Default Some people just make you roll your eyes...

    I was walking Shadow (my big Golden retriever/Collie) and Tribble (my registered Pem) this weekend and met a couple who were out with their dog. It was a cute, fuzzy medium-sized brown dog with sort of a shepherd-looking face and ears, and a bobbed tail. I asked them if they knew what mix their dog was. "Oh, Corgi and Shepherd." Then the woman looked RIGHT AT TRIBBLE, who is the epitome of a Pembroke (champions on both bloodlines) and said, "Oh, what kind of dog is that?" Uh.....a CORGI!!!

    "Oh! She must hunt all the mice and rodents just like Fluffy. That's the Corgi in her!" Uh.....NO. Corgis are HERDING DOGS, NOT terriers!

    You would think if you're convinced that your dog is part Corgi or whatever, that you'd go look up the breed and see what it is they actually DO.
    I realize that I'm generalizing here, but as is often the case when I generalize, I don't care. ~ Dave Barry



  2. #2
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    Jan. 4, 2000
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    I agree that that is ABSOLUTELY TERRIBLE! They should be shot!

    No I don't, actually. Not everyone knows everything about dogs. Who cares. It's normal to hear a lot of misinformation about dogs all the time.

    Most crossbred dogs are mixes of the commonest breeds, especially the ones that tend to run around loose and have ah...'unprotected sex'. Corgis are only common in horsey circles. A bob tail dog, if created in the city or suburbs, is more likely to be a retriever rottweiler cross, or a heeler sheltie cross would be a rare possibility. Don't think exotic, rare breeds; the commonest breeds can easily combine to produce a variety of traits. Think common breeds, common in the area where he was whelped.

    Aside from that, actually, you may not know quite as much as you think, every single corgi I've ever met is death on mice, if they weren't so fat they couldn't move. From barkbytes, on a widely accepted theory about corgis:

    "The dog had to be multi-purpose. Bird hunter, ratter, domestic duck and geese herding, cattle or sheep herding, sometimes even having to hunt his own food for dinner,"

    Dogs of a given breed to not spend their entire lives evincing only one behavior. MOST herding breeds are also very good at doing a great many other things. My collie in addition to herding, does obedience, agility, nursing home visits, and LURE COURSING. And NO, he is NOT a greyhound! (see below).

    My collie is also death on mice.

    Yes, a collie is a herding dog.

    Quelle surprise!

    And MICE are exactly the same as tiny sheep, except they are hors d'ouvres!

    We must frequently pry him out of the space between the sliding stall doors, where he is SURE there is a mouse. Another gravely exciting possibility is the pile of cavalletti poles. If he is ordered not to scramble about in them, he must ATTEND to them, staring motionless with head c0cked. He actually can WILL those mice to run out and jump into his mouth!

    There is also the space between the hay bales. These areas are mined with such astuteness and persistence that it cannot possibly be imagined. I frequently am treated to a horse that leaps forward because there is a collie trying to climb in between the kickboards and the wall. Then there is the trailer. The garage, and thankfully, occasionally the kitchen, though the house in general receives far less attention.

    It is rather wondrous to see him leaping along in gigantic bounds in the tall grass, trying to bounce the mice into the air where they can be snatched in mid air!

    Now let me see....what other dog does that....HMMMM....Oh I know! My friend's corgi!

    He constantly has Mouse Breath, and some of the mice are stored away til good and ripe and then brought into the house as 'Gifts'. They may be stashed under a strategic Pile of Leaves to rot a bit and then chucked down in one swallow, YUM! Leaf raking is such a traumatic time....'where are my mice! I left them here to age like a fine wine!'

    My smooth collie has been declared everything from a wolf cross to a poodle to a greyhound to 'some other kind of collie'. Some woman at the park with two labs on a rope insisted he is 'a crossbred' of a collie and 'something that causes spots'. Spaghetti sauce? Blueberries?

    Now when people say, 'What kind of dog is he?' I reply so gently, 'What kind of dog do you WANT him to be?'

    As a dog owner one has to relax and learn to enjoy these moments instead of being H&M.

    The BEST moment was when we attended a pancake breakfast (collies also are widely known for their love of pancakes) for the local fire station. A gigantic fireman at one point wound up parked in front of our collie, staring at him intently.

    Our smoothie has some very alarming markings on his face, where the color abruptly changes right down the middle of his muzzle, the blacker side of his face has a white mottled ear, and the lighter side of his face has an almost entirely black ear. He looks like a painting by Marcel duChamp.

    I asked very gently what he was looking at, and he said 'I AM ADMIRING THE PERFECT SYMMETRY OF HIS MUZZLE'.

    Why of COURSE you are!
    Last edited by slc2; Jan. 21, 2009 at 07:33 AM.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar. 5, 2008
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    Hagerstown, MD
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    Default

    Amen slc2 - most crossbreds are the most common breeds running around loose.

    I have to laugh when a client, who found a cat who happens to be large and long haired, tells me they think the cat is part Norwegian Forest Cat. Yeah, I see alot of those running around feral in Western MD!!!



  4. #4
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    It's much more like to be a Fat Cat. That is a VERY special breed of cat. When you feed them alot, the metamorphosize into a Fat Cat.



  5. #5
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    Mar. 5, 2008
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    Fat Cat - definition - cute, can wile any human with a certain look and purring, kneading dough with front paws - once said human is caught, unlimited access to food - an act of affection on the humans' part - and said stray turns into Fat Cat and is set for life!



  6. #6
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    Aug. 9, 2007
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    They are not mutts, they are multicultural.

    My purebred Aussies and yellow lab have always been purchased, but the multicultural dogs and cats I've scraped off the road and found in pounds are just as special.

    Let the people love their "part corgi." City folks in St. Louis asked me more than once if my Aussie puppy was a "bear cub." when there weren't many Aussies around.

    One of the best dogs I ever had was Chadwick, a part white German Sheperd-looking dog with big brown eyes and blond fur whom I found at a murder scene when he was a puppy. I called him a "Chinook" and my neighbors thought he was a great (and beautiful) dog. Had they known his origin, he might have not been thought of so highly.



  7. #7
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    Remember that female dogs can have litters sired by different males, where not all puppies are from the same breed on the father's side.

    So, unless you are very sure who a female was bred to and that it was ONLY that male, most mixed dogs are just that, mixed and you can't really be sure what all may be in the mix.

    We bred dogs by breeds so we can have a fairly good idea of what we will get in the puppies, but even there you can have surprises from genes way back when.

    In dogs of unkown breeding, all bets are off.
    The AKC will admit neutered dogs for performance shows like obedience and agility if they resemble closely any one breed and most such dogs do resemble some breed.
    Because of that similarity, many dogs get their AKC ILP number and can show.
    Our dog club has several dogs that can show under those rules, but there have been a few that were so mixed you could not tell what breed they resembled, so could not be accepted.

    Sounds like that one dog in the OP post was one such.
    All dogs are neat dogs, no matter what breed or cross, but naming the breeds of dogs up on the mix is a guess, who knows what is there and that is fine.



  8. #8
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    Sep. 2, 2005
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    Upstate NY
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    I figure as long as people are taking good care of their mutt there is no reason to roll my eyes at them if they have not studied the entire history of the breeds that might be contained in it.

    And though I usually have a pretty good idea of what breed people's dogs are when they bring them into obedience class I usually ask them anyway. I am sometimes very shocked. If nothing else it is a good conversation starter.



  9. #9
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    May. 6, 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by trubandloki View Post
    I figure as long as people are taking good care of their mutt there is no reason to roll my eyes at them if they have not studied the entire history of the breeds that might be contained in it.

    And though I usually have a pretty good idea of what breed people's dogs are when they bring them into obedience class I usually ask them anyway. I am sometimes very shocked. If nothing else it is a good conversation starter.
    Most definitly



  10. #10
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    Oct. 18, 2000
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    I once had an AKC Basset Hound named Giuseppe. He was almost solid red; just a little bit of white. (any hound color is acceptable for this breed.)


    The first time I took him to the vet she looked at him and said.... drum roll please.....



    "Oh look, a Standard Dachshund."


    I guess someone needs to graduate at the bottom of the class......




    Quote Originally Posted by Guin View Post
    You would think if you're convinced that your dog is part Corgi or whatever, that you'd go look up the breed and see what it is they actually DO.



  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by trubandloki View Post
    I figure as long as people are taking good care of their mutt there is no reason to roll my eyes at them if they have not studied the entire history of the breeds that might be contained in it.

    And though I usually have a pretty good idea of what breed people's dogs are when they bring them into obedience class I usually ask them anyway. I am sometimes very shocked. If nothing else it is a good conversation starter.
    The first time someone brought a miniature aussie to dog class I was puzzled, asked if it was a sheltie, thinking sheltie cross and was huffily informed it was the "new aussies".
    I learned to ask first, not offer an opinion on any dog's breed.



  12. #12
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    Aug. 7, 2005
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    Actually their dog could have Corgi in it and you never know it. I have a little half JC half Pom and nobody would EVER guess in a million years there was a drop of Pom in this dog. He looks like a short coated brown dog...that's all. If you go over him inch by inch you will see that he has the Pom tail with short hair. We know for a fact that his breeding is what it is as his parents are my Daughter's house dogs. The female got out of "her" room when she was in heat and the mating was discovered while it was taking place. Lots of times you cannot tell a dogs breeding by looking at it.
    Years ago I had a Poodle x Scottie. When we were moving here she got out and bred with a very heavy boned Beagle. She had four pups, two looked exactly like solid black Beagles, two looked like purebred Scottie pups. The people who took the two "Scottie" pups told me that their Vet argued with them that these pups HAD to be purebred. Nobody would ever have believed these puppies had Beagle in them.
    You know why cowboys don't like Appaloosas?" - Answer: Because to train a horse, you have to be smarter than it is.



  13. #13
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    Sep. 17, 2003
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    Fort Myers, Florida
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    SLC - LOVED IT!!!! We need a picture of this amazing mixed up mouser of yours....
    "My treasures do not sparkle or glitter, they shine in the sunlight and nicker to me in the night"



  14. #14
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    Apr. 4, 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bluey View Post
    The first time someone brought a miniature aussie to dog class I was puzzled, asked if it was a sheltie, thinking sheltie cross and was huffily informed it was the "new aussies".
    I learned to ask first, not offer an opinion on any dog's breed.
    Actually, ASCA is pretty sure that they are not the "new" aussies. They take great exception to using the name Aussie in conjunction with minis and toys. Unfortunately, they never TM or copyrighted the name, so they are SOL. But they are doing what they can to educate the public. Minis and toys do not meet the breed standard, they can not be dual registered and they are NOT Aussies. In fact, most people agree that the Toys, in particular are not purebred dogs. But even many of the minis clearly are not purebred Aussies either.
    Luistano Stallion standing for 2013: Wolverine UVF
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8IZPHDzgX3s



  15. #15
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    Mar. 13, 2007
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    Tennessee
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    I also have two registered corgis from show lines, and they definitely have the hunting instinct. My male had to be banned from the barn because he would not only chase the chickens, but pounce on them and attempt to dispatch them with a bite to the neck. The female just eats random piles of horse manure and gets exceptionally offensive breath, along with digestive upset.

    Look at these faces! Do they look like killers to you?

    http://s127.photobucket.com/albums/p...s-and-Andy.jpg
    "Dogs give and give and give. Cats are the gift that keeps on grifting." –Bradley Trevor Greive



  16. #16
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    Feb. 23, 2008
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    My biggest dog related eye roll - a woman at a barn I used to board at who showed up one day with her new puppy - a mastiff type - and proceeded to warn us to be very careful if we passed by her property because this was a big scary aggressive breed, and she couldn't be responsible if something happened. Meanwhile the "scary" puppy was blathering around, wagging his tail, and happily drooling on everyone who walked by. Big eyeroll.



  17. #17
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    Apr. 4, 2007
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    Default Rolling eyes -me too.

    Quote Originally Posted by Guin View Post
    I was walking Shadow (my big Golden retriever/Collie) and Tribble (my registered Pem) this weekend and met a couple who were out with their dog. It was a cute, fuzzy medium-sized brown dog with sort of a shepherd-looking face and ears, and a bobbed tail. I asked them if they knew what mix their dog was. "Oh, Corgi and Shepherd." Then the woman looked RIGHT AT TRIBBLE, who is the epitome of a Pembroke (champions on both bloodlines) and said, "Oh, what kind of dog is that?" Uh.....a CORGI!!!

    "Oh! She must hunt all the mice and rodents just like Fluffy. That's the Corgi in her!" Uh.....NO. Corgis are HERDING DOGS, NOT terriers!

    You would think if you're convinced that your dog is part Corgi or whatever, that you'd go look up the breed and see what it is they actually DO.
    Roll eyes:
    Look up history corgi hunting or corgi rats hunting on google.
    They were developed, in part to be farm dogs and hunting rodents was part of that. They also were developed from other breeds of dogs that were hunting dogs.

    "History:
    The Pembroke was probably developed in Wales from progenitors brought to 12th century Pembrokeshire, Wales, by Flemish weavers. Welsh Corgis were developed to herd cattle, guard the farm and hunt rats and other small animals."
    http://www.dog-breed-facts.com/Breed...lsh-corgi.html

    From the Pembroke Welsh Corgi Club of America, Inc.
    "The Corgi in Britain was primarily a drover of the Welsh cattle, but was also used as a guardian of the farmyard against invasion by any type of vermin."
    http://www.pembrokecorgi.org/PE_Herding.html

    I used to own Corgis, while having a farm. They most certainly do love to hunt rats and other small animals! They most definitely have those genes!
    Luistano Stallion standing for 2013: Wolverine UVF
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8IZPHDzgX3s



  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cielo Azure View Post
    Actually, ASCA is pretty sure that they are not the "new" aussies. They take great exception to using the name Aussie in conjunction with minis and toys. Unfortunately, they never TM or copyrighted the name, so they are SOL. But they are doing what they can to educate the public. Minis and toys do not meet the breed standard, they can not be dual registered and they are NOT Aussies. In fact, most people agree that the Toys, in particular are not purebred dogs. But even many of the minis clearly are not purebred Aussies either.
    I know, but I have seen some showing as aussies with their ILP, so, I guess that in the pictures presented for registration, they did look enough like an aussie to be called that.

    I have a friend with one and he is a really neat dog and he is a good aussie type, just 1/3 the regular size.

    My own old aussie was from old herding lines and not bobtailed or with the heavy coat and thickness of today's aussies, that are a little too extreme in type, compared with the old, true working ones.

    I guess that some breeds have been evolving also.



  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by slc2 View Post
    A bob tail dog, if created in the city or suburbs, is more likely to be a retriever rottweiler cross,
    Hu? Rotties have artificially docked tails, leaving only one or two vertabrae. They are not born "bobbed."




  20. #20
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    if they're not docked they have a relatively thick, medium length tail. I'll ask my friend if she docked her lab-rottie cross. I could have misunderstood her, I thought she said something about rottie crosses occasionally coming out tailless. There are some 'cur dogs' around in the country here with naturally short tails.



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