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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan. 18, 2009
    Posts
    43

    Default Barn Owners do you board stallions?

    Do you board stallions at your barn? In some barns I have heard the phrase "No I would never keep a stud here" Do you/would you board stallions? I'm not talking a barn full!
    Is this a no no? If you own a stud do you basically have to have your own place?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun. 12, 2007
    Location
    Westchester County, NY
    Posts
    5,715

    Default

    I've only ever boarded at two barns that would consider a stallion, and they were training barns, not boarding barns. Mostly, the boarding barns I've been at, or around, relied on staff of varying experience levels to turn in and out, muck stalls, etc. Some barns have shared fence lines between fields, so it doesn't really work there either. For others, its more guarding business, lots of gelding and mare owners think stallions breath fire and don't want to board with one- so its better for business not to.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun. 4, 2002
    Location
    Suffolk, VA
    Posts
    16,684

    Default

    Well...I do but part of my boarding operation is dedicated to breeding services. We stood a stallion here for a client for a while until he was sold. Most boarding barns cannot accommodate them though so you'd have to look for a breeding setup or a place dedicated to keeping stallions.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar. 10, 2004
    Location
    IA
    Posts
    4,145

    Default

    I have a stallion and my own place. But when training I've not found it too hard to find someone who would take a stallion or colt. Boarding, not so much, as mentioned, they're not generally set up for stallions or it would frighten other boarders.
    A Merrick N Dream Farm
    Proud Member of "Someone Special to me serves in the Military" Clique



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan. 12, 2007
    Posts
    4,227

    Default

    I have stood stallions here and boarded/trained stallions here.

    From my stand point the problem with stallions is usually via the mares that board here as well. They are waaaay more interested than the boys are - Of course the boys are more interested in the pleather "couch" (what the kids called the phantom) than the mares any way

    Of course if the owner was incompetent i would have to say no!



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar. 10, 2004
    Location
    IA
    Posts
    4,145

    Default

    Couch... oh that's cute!! So you don't hear questions from kids like, "why did he pee in the mare?" (asked by my then 5yo son after watching my stallion do the deed for the first time... he wasn't supposed to be watching, but curiosity got the best of him. I could hardly contain myself to answer the question. ) LOL, "how come he can jump on the couch, but we get in trouble for it?"
    A Merrick N Dream Farm
    Proud Member of "Someone Special to me serves in the Military" Clique



  7. #7
    Join Date
    May. 12, 2000
    Location
    NE TN, USA
    Posts
    6,201

    Default

    Of the nine barns where I've boarded, all but one have accepted stallions. But they had to be very well-mannered.
    “There are two ways to conquer and enslave a nation. One is by the sword. The other is by debt.”
    John Adams



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul. 12, 2005
    Location
    Western North Carolina
    Posts
    2,982

    Default

    When we boarded our horses, the BO had up to two stallions for breeding/showing. The facility wasn't ideally suited for housing 2 stallions and barely suitable for 1. The original stallion's double sized stall also had a large paddock off of it but common fence on two sides with boarded horses and a 4' gate situated at one corner of his paddock. I can remember having to be very careful about leading my mare through that gate because if the stallion was 'out', he'd reach over the fence trying to grab my mare while she'd be trying to kick him...if she wasn't in season. It was a very poor setup!

    Once the 2nd stallion arrived, although it was kept in a separate barn from the other, it would get out and go to the other barn to fight the 1st stallion. Well, the 2nd stallion's stall door was open at the top so he'd climb over. Did I say it was a very poor setup??? I learned a lot about what not to do while we boarded there.

    Here at our barn we have boarded stallions before but no more than one at a time. Our barn is concrete block construction and the stall doors are solid on the bottom half and bars on top. The turnout paddocks I used were completely separate from other turnout areas but not totally isolated so the stallions could see other horses but nothing more. Well behaved stallions were always a pleasure to board. The not so well behaved ones couldn't leave quickly enough.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2005
    Location
    Northeast
    Posts
    10,186

    Smile

    They are alot of extra trouble. been there done that. We don't now, and I doubt we ever will.
    Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun. 17, 2001
    Location
    down the road from bar.ka
    Posts
    31,047

    Default

    Never been in a boarding barn that took them and never been in a decent training barn that did not.

    Just that they do require some extra thought, seperate turn out and need experienced handling. Things not in great abundance at your average mid to low priced boarding barn.
    When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

    The horse world. Two people. Three opinions.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb. 27, 2003
    Posts
    3,010

    Default

    We have one. He's very respectful of the fence, so he does have a shared fenceline with girls. We haven't had an issue yet. He's also super mellow, and has a mini-mule as a buddy.

    Our new trainer will very likely be getting stallions in for training. So we're building a small stall barn that will be eventually used as a stallion barn.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2007
    Posts
    1,803

    Default

    In my present set up no..........if I had a separate stall and paddock area that was fortified for strength and extra height and the stallion was easy.......I would consider it but at an extra cost.

    Dalemma



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan. 3, 2007
    Location
    Poulsbo, WA
    Posts
    924

    Default

    We have our own place, but when the weather gets bad in the winter, I often board out our boy where there is an indoor (if we can afford it) so he can stay in work.

    It can be a challenge to find barns that will take stallions, but I understand why. Not every barn is set up physically for them (high fences, etc), and not every barn has people working there that are comfortable handling them for turnout, etc. Some boarders are scared of them being around at first, too...

    Truely, I think tons depends on the stallion's owner/trainer. If a stallion is well handled and behaved, he shouldn't be much extra trouble. But if he isn't, that could definitely become a disaster/liability fast for a BO.

    We were lucky that several barns knew me as a rider/trainer already before we got our stallion, so they were willing to give our guy a chance. All have told me since how impressed they were with his manners, etc., so it has worked out well.

    As a BO myself, I think my willingness to take on a stallion (as a boarder) would depend mostly on how capable/knowledgeable I felt that the stallion's owner/trainer was. I would probably also charge a bit more bc they do need different, taller fenced/larger paddocks, most need individual turn out, and because any stalls/paddocks next to them will be limited to keeping other stallions or geldings in, etc.
    Last edited by Blacktree; Jan. 20, 2009 at 01:18 PM.
    Blacktree Farm
    Lessons, training & sporthorse sales. Proud supporter of our buckskin German Warmblood stallion, Yeager GF.
    Blacktree Studio
    Graphic Design, Web Design & Photography.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar. 9, 2006
    Location
    Lucama, NC
    Posts
    5,868

    Default

    I own a stallion, he for the msot aprt stays at home. However, he has been at several trainers with no issues. He is very laid back and easy to deal with, very socialized in terms of not having to be "isolated' other than having private turnout, but very close to the others with no problem. However, although we board I doubt seriously I would board a stallion here. I jsut know the logistical problems it can create and liability, not all stallions are as well mannered as mine, and even so if he were to "get out" there would be issues.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Sep. 29, 2003
    Location
    Townsend, MA
    Posts
    981

    Default

    it's an insurance issue also - your ccc policy has to be huge.
    I know of one lawsuit (won by the stallion owner) in which
    a horse got loose and got hit by a truck. They not only
    recovered the cost of the stallion, but also the cost of his
    potential breedings for his lifetime. On the order of 50 straws
    at $1000 per x 20 years = 1 million just in lost breedings.
    Dot



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Aug. 7, 2005
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    2,493

    Default

    I don't board now but if I did I wouldn't have a stallion boarding. When I managed a barn the owner told me to allow stallions so we did. Had two. One night one got out and there was evidently a horrible fight over the fence. Came in and one was cut, banged, chewed on, etc. until we thought he would die. The other had his boo boos but was in much better shape.
    We had one boarder who brought her gelding to our place because the place she boarded before us had a stud who was constantly beating on her gelding.
    I know some are gentle, well behaved boys who wouldn't hurt anything (knew an arab and a wh like that) but I just wouldn't want to chance it.
    You know why cowboys don't like Appaloosas?" - Answer: Because to train a horse, you have to be smarter than it is.



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