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  1. #1
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    Nov. 20, 2005
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    Default a year lame = forever lame?

    How much truth is there to this statement? I have a nagging feeling that it might be true. (heard it from a vet) I am inclined to think that my filly's sprained(?) ankle has turned into an arthritic condition after almost a year. Any ideas of how long it takes for arthritis to develop from a soft tissue injury? (inflamed joint capsule) We'll be doing some more xrays to check within the next few weeks.
    Again, would love some insight from others about this



  2. #2
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    Jan. 26, 2001
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    NC
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    Default

    I had one lame for 1 1/2 years from 5-7. We started him back without much hope. Although he has issues, he is 15 this year and does lessons 3-4 days a week. It is a real problem with balancing the soft tissue with oncoming arthritis. Soft tissue usually means no work and arthritis benefits from work! With some blips along the way, we have kept this guy in work for coming up on 8 years.
    I use the B and L solution for him. Devils claw and yucca. It really helps the pain relief so we can keep him going.
    Last edited by shea'smom; Jan. 18, 2009 at 02:24 PM.



  3. #3
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    Nov. 20, 2005
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    Default

    oops, I think this should have been in the horse care section-



  4. #4
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    Aug. 25, 2004
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    Default

    I do not think this is a hard and fast rule, but something to be cognizant of. You need to look at the type of injury and then the desired level after. Some ligament or hoof issues can take more than a year, but the horses are riding sound after. If you are talking about taking a horse that has been lame for a year and then doing international grand prix with them, that would probably take a miracle.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun. 4, 2006
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    Default

    If the soft tissue injury is fully healed your horse may just need some maintenance. Steroid and HA or in IRAP has been quite helpful, followed by legend and adequan and a daily supplement and lots of turnout may be helpful. Your mare might come back for light ridding with some help depending on how much you want to invest. If the mare is in chronic pain and young you could consider fusion. You could ask about tildren.

    Best wishes!



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2005
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    Northeast
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    Question

    I think the answer lies in the initial Dx. You have written " sprained(?)ankle". What exactly was the injury? How was it treated?
    Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov. 10, 2006
    Location
    Southern Finger Lakes of NY
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    Default

    Another anecdote from Morgan-land:

    BO's prize yearling stud, running through the field, showing off how hot he was, looking over his shoulder, took a somersaulting tumble -- all the way over, didn't get up for 10 minutes. BO sure he broke his back.

    Vet comes. Dx: sprained back, torn & swollen tissues, likely to develop arthritis, never be ridable, should be put down.

    BO took a chance, loving this guy's personality too much...the perfect future stallion-- a gentleman through and through, and good lines to breed.
    She rested him a few days, until he seemed perky, then turned him back out to do as he would and let nature & good care take their courses...

    Started him at age six. Competed as high as 3rd level (never could master the flying change). Sired nearly 20 foals, including my own bay baby boy. Has been her #1 lesson horse for more than 15 years.

    So, some need a chance. Sometimes it's a loooong time. The decision as to whether the horse is worth it is dependent on a lot of factors in your own life and what the vets have to say. And, of course, whether the horse is comfortable and living a quality life through the recovery.

    Good luck; I hope there's a happy ending for your filly.
    Last edited by Bayou Roux; Jan. 18, 2009 at 06:35 PM. Reason: Checked his show records-- he competed 3rd level!
    Foxwin Farm
    Home of The Bay Boy Wonder
    and other fine Morgan Sporthorses



  8. #8
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    Mar. 24, 2004
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    Yew-stuhn, Texas
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    Default

    Depends, rebeginner on this board has a mare, who had Sweeney shoulder and EPM (treated) at the same time. Vet advice was to lay the mare up for a year. She did that, had the mare out on pasture for a year.

    Mare is now back in training (per vet's OK) and is sound.
    View my photographs at www.horsephotoguy.zenfolio.com



  9. #9
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    Nov. 20, 2005
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    missoula. mt
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by merrygoround View Post
    I think the answer lies in the initial Dx. You have written " sprained(?)ankle". What exactly was the injury? How was it treated?
    the initial, and subsequent diagnosis was a sprain, "synovitis"- inflammed joint capsule (right hind fetlock joint) Initially she was given an injection of steroids in the joint and put on 30 days stall rest, from which she emerged sound, then ran around and was lame on it again. Since then (that was about 7 months ago) since I was concerned about her quality of life and she was developing some bad habits on stall rest, the vets advised to just turn her out and give the injury some time. It has not improved. Although I will say I have not been successful about keeping her quiet 100% of the time. She has escaped from her pasture (don't ask) a few times, ran around and aggravated the injury. UGH



  10. #10
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    May. 6, 2007
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    Connecticut
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    It depends on the individual, but my gelding was off for about a year and came back to full work. However, we did see improvement along the way -- he went from very lame to just looking a bit ouchy every once and awhile. He tore the check ligament in a front leg. We put shoes back on for support, tested and then treated for Lyme, and did hock injections (sore hocks, I'm guessing in part because he was trying to compensate for discomfort on the front, although I think they were a long time coming and would have popped up regardless), and he was 100% sound to gradually come back into work. So I guess my point is two-fold -- a long recovery period does not always indicate a terrible prognosis, although I would hope to see drastic improvement during that time. Also, I would be sure that you're not pinning all unsoundness on the original cause. Explore other options, as it sounds like you are. Something may have developed in the meantime. But if my horse were still seriously lame with minimal improvement a year later on the same leg, I would be very concerned. It sounds like you're talking to your vet, doing all the right things. Good luck!
    Gentleman J - "Junior" - My been-there, done-that jumper

    Send Your Love - "Serena" - Aug 10th 2009, Rest in Peace



  11. #11
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    Jan. 31, 2003
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    I know that hindsight is 20/20 and all that, but just so you know.. I have had many vets tell me to never inject a joint w/steroids and then rest the horse, to always do it in the opposite order. I would not even bother saying that except for that if I don't, well.. you know. So I am sorry about that.

    Now - I have had many horses come sound after extended pasture rest - after watching them get more sore at times, and more lame at times, so your girl is young - I would invest in *Adequan* and MSM and a really really good trim. I would also try very hard to not watch her like a hawk and make myself crazy over every little tweak. Easier said than done, I know. Also keep in mind that any horse that was on stall rest that long is probably incredibly weak all over - tendons, ligaments, muscles - and may very well end up doing all sorts of things to herself before it's all over. Really, turning a semi-blind eye might save your sanity.
    "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
    ---
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.



  12. #12
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    Jun. 4, 2006
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    [QUOTE=EqTrainer;3814735]I know that hindsight is 20/20 and all that, but just so you know.. I have had many vets tell me to never inject a joint w/steroids and then rest the horse, to always do it in the opposite order. I would not even bother saying that except for that if I don't, well.. you know. So I am sorry about that.

    That is exactly what we did with my gelding after his collateral ligament (MRI diagnosed), I wondered in hindsight if that was the best choise? I would have rather done IRAP shockwave or stem cell, I will learn to be inquisitive if I am ever in that situation again.



  13. #13
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    [quote=Fharoah;3814878]
    Quote Originally Posted by EqTrainer View Post
    I know that hindsight is 20/20 and all that, but just so you know.. I have had many vets tell me to never inject a joint w/steroids and then rest the horse, to always do it in the opposite order. I would not even bother saying that except for that if I don't, well.. you know. So I am sorry about that.

    That is exactly what we did with my gelding after his collateral ligament (MRI diagnosed), I wondered in hindsight if that was the best choise? I would have rather done IRAP shockwave or stem cell, I will learn to be inquisitive if I am ever in that situation again.
    What did they inject it w/? It being soft tissue, I would imagine it was not a steroid.

    I think the reasoning behind resting before injecting is that in order for joint injections to be as effective as possible, the horse should be moving. But I *have* also had vets tell me that they do not want to inject an actual *lame* horse (with corticosteroids) with active inflammation from an injury, that they would rather rest them and once the initial inflammation is over, then inject and return to turnout or rehab. I have a horse now who my vet intends to inject before he goes back to work this spring - he had a trochanter injury - he is sound and happy on it now after pasture rest - but she wants to before he goes into work to avoid what she feels will be inevitable inflammation if she doesn't. He will also go on Adequan.

    I really wonder if for the OP Adequan would not have been the way to do. Assuming some joint injury in a young horse, given what Adequan does, I would have thought it would have been a much better choice than a corticosteroid. Then again I wasn't there, so who knows. You can also inject Adequan IA, although I am not sure if you can do a high motion joint like a fetlock.
    "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
    ---
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.



  14. #14
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    Jun. 4, 2006
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    Default

    [QUOTE=EqTrainer;3814930][quote=Fharoah;3814878]

    What did they inject it w/? It being soft tissue, I would imagine it was not a steroid.

    They injected Triamcinolone and Hyvisc. The radiographs changed some in that four month total rest, don't know if that was a factor or not? I tend to learn the hard way



  15. #15
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    Dec. 28, 2001
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    PA
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    Default

    She has escaped from her pasture (don't ask) a few times, ran around and aggravated the injury.
    Hmm. Look at it this way: it hasn't really been a year if she has re-injured herself a few times. Have you thought about trying reserpine or another long-acting tranquilizer to keep her calm? I do wish you luck, soft tissue injuries are the worst. I have one that has been on the disabled list for a year and a half.



  16. #16
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    Oct. 19, 2005
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    Default

    Well, the x-rays will tell you for sure. If the x-rays are not clear or inconclusive, I would start to suspect something else as the real problem.

    Did you change her diet and how much bute is she on, if any? You want to feed them a low carb diet while recuperating, so they won't run like idiots and re-injure themselves and you do not want give them too much bute so they cannot feel the pain. There's a reason for pain - it also protects from re-injury!



  17. #17
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    [quote=Fharoah;3815032][quote=EqTrainer;3814930]
    Quote Originally Posted by Fharoah View Post

    What did they inject it w/? It being soft tissue, I would imagine it was not a steroid.

    They injected Triamcinolone and Hyvisc. The radiographs changed some in that four month total rest, don't know if that was a factor or not? I tend to learn the hard way

    I Just wonder if we are missing part of the puzzle here. Could you ask your vet what exactly they injected and why? That sounds like a IA (joint) injection, not a soft tissue injection. Plus soft tissue doesn't show up on rads (but of course it did/would on the MRI). Hmmmmmm. I am very curious!
    "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
    ---
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.



  18. #18
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    Nov. 20, 2005
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    missoula. mt
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    Default

    [QUOTE=EqTrainer;3815463][quote=Fharoah;3815032]
    Quote Originally Posted by EqTrainer View Post


    I Just wonder if we are missing part of the puzzle here. Could you ask your vet what exactly they injected and why? That sounds like a IA (joint) injection, not a soft tissue injection. Plus soft tissue doesn't show up on rads (but of course it did/would on the MRI). Hmmmmmm. I am very curious!
    EqTrainer: Thank you so much for your interest!!!! I am no longer using the vet that injected her- and that is one of the reasons why. In fact now I am VERY interested in what he put into her and will find out today. I will let you know!



  19. #19
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    Aug. 25, 2005
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    Whatever the reason for a lay-up, Icannot help but think that turning a horse out after a lay-up is begging for trouble. I would prefer seeing them hand walked (It is boring), and then sedated for the first week. Because invariably, they race around and reinjure an area that is weaker from doing nothing.
    Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.



  20. #20
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    Feb. 24, 2005
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    Alpharetta, Georgia
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    My horse has been on and off lame, at one point, for nearly three years! He is magical now, something I did not dare to hope at times. DO NOT give up hope. Arthritis can be dealt with, exercise, supplements, adequan...there is such much out there nowadays. It is just a matter of how much one expects them to do.

    Good luck!
    Better to ask for forgiveness, than for permission.



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