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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May. 21, 2004
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    N. TX...just N.East of paradise...
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    2,024

    Default Spinoff: IR horses in the frigid cold...what about hay?

    I read all the posts about should you have your horses out on the cold. The main answers seemed to be yes with lots of hay.

    Now those of us with IR horses are pretty sure loading them up on hay would be a bad idea? Right? No?

    What to do when it's frigid cold for the IR horses??? Lots of hay and worry about laminitis, or little hay and worry about them being too cold?
    "As a rule we disbelieve all the facts and theories for which we have no use."- William James
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Proud member of the Wheat Loss Clique.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar. 8, 2008
    Location
    Elverson/Morgantown, Pa
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    348

    Default

    I just use what they call "filler Hay" or Orchard Grass. You can get it from your hay supplier, it's not the BEST quality hay, not a whole lot to it... Just something to keep them occupied...

    I've had to keep my IR horse in all day today, due to the 14* weather and he didn't make a peep


    If that made any sense...
    You board with what I call a, sh!t disturber - Patty Lynch



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2002
    Location
    PA, where the State motto is: "If it makes sense, we don't do it!".
    Posts
    11,023

    Default

    You might also consider Safe Starch Forage from Triple Crown. A little pricey but guaranteed to be around 10% NSC.

    You could also supplement with some long stem hay--if you give both (the TC SS and regular hay) you wouldn't have to worry about overloading them on the bad stuff....

    Not sure about the NSC of the cubed hay (alfalfa or timothy/alfalfa). Seems to me the Blue Seal hay stretcher pellets are 22% NSC and the Nutrena/Agway hay stretcher pellets are 15% NSC. The only drawback is the BS is lower in calories while the N/A is higher in calories. My horse was okay as long as I mixed the two equally but if I tried to give her the N/A pellets only, which were lower in NSC%, she would go nuts from all the calories.... It's enough to drive a body crazy!!!!
    "One person can change the world, and everyone should try." ~John F. Kennedy~



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug. 30, 2007
    Location
    Illinois, USA
    Posts
    8,174

    Default

    My mare lives outside 24/7, and doesn't get free range hay. She gets hay usually three times a day, sometimes twice. She does just fine, but I also blanket her.
    Tell a Gelding. Ask a Stallion. Discuss it with a Mare... Pray if it's a Pony!



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2003
    Posts
    18,472

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Melelio View Post
    I read all the posts about should you have your horses out on the cold. The main answers seemed to be yes with lots of hay.

    Now those of us with IR horses are pretty sure loading them up on hay would be a bad idea? Right? No?

    What to do when it's frigid cold for the IR horses??? Lots of hay and worry about laminitis, or little hay and worry about them being too cold?
    I feed my IR horses free choice hay, 24/7, without exception.

    Witholding forage from them only screws up their metabolism even more. Horses are meant to eat forage constantly.
    "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
    ---
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan. 14, 2006
    Location
    Nashville, TN
    Posts
    4,000

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by EqTrainer View Post
    I feed my IR horses free choice hay, 24/7, without exception.

    Witholding forage from them only screws up their metabolism even more. Horses are meant to eat forage constantly.
    Ditto that.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2003
    Posts
    18,472

    Default

    Not to mention the risk of hyperlipimia in horses whose food is withheld... particularly the fat IR horses. If you have been told NOT to feed your IR horse free choice forage, definately rethink your plan and do some more research.
    "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
    ---
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar. 18, 2006
    Location
    Ny
    Posts
    313

    Default

    My mare has never been diagnosed IR but she is an air fern. I always used to keep her on free choice hay. IMO that is the best way to go. She always got VERY little grain (if any) and the free choice hay. This always worked ok no matter what pasture buddy she had until I got a shetland pony about a year and a half ago. Those two get along but compete for food like crazy. Even now, no matter how much hay I put in front of them they will not stop eating until the other does and that's pretty much never. They were eating close to 5-6% of their body weight daily in hay and getting larger and larger. I had to put them on a diet for their safety.

    When I started feeding 2.5% of their body weight in hay daily they would have that finished in under an hour. So I went out and got a hay bag with extra small holes in it. Millers sells them, that's the best price I've found so far. The small holes force them to take longer eating and the 2.5% of their body weight in hay now takes them almost all day to eat. They spend very little time without food in their mouths and if they weren't so darn competitive they would probably have more then enough.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2003
    Posts
    18,472

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    The appetite of a pony may indeed be a nightmare. Great idea about the hay bags
    "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
    ---
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct. 3, 2002
    Location
    it's not the edge of the earth, but you can see it from here
    Posts
    12,079

    Default

    Funny that you're calling orchard junk hay. Up here Orchard/Timothy is PRIME hay...
    InnisFailte Pinto Sporthorses & Coloured Cobs
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Bits are like cats, what's one more? (Petstorejunkie)



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov. 9, 2005
    Location
    uk
    Posts
    15,268

    Default

    you must have something simular to haylage that we have in uk as then you dont need to soaklook here tells you about it -- www.thehaylagecompany.co.uk



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar. 14, 2002
    Location
    The horse country of VA
    Posts
    3,319

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Miss-O View Post
    ...So I went out and got a hay bag with extra small holes in it. Millers sells them, that's the best price I've found so far. The small holes force them to take longer eating and the 2.5% of their body weight in hay now takes them almost all day to eat...
    That's what I did, and I wish I had known about those hay nets sooner! My mare is IR, but in this kind of cold weather, I don't fret about exact poundage of the hay she's getting. The important thing is that she has something to munch on for the majority of her day and night, and those hay nets do the trick. Of course it helps that my (lovely!) orchard grass hay is only 6% NSC.

    I just ordered two more of those nets to put out around the paddock to encourage more moving around. Smith Brothers also carries them for the same price at Miller's:
    http://www.smithbrothers.com/product..._pn_E_X3-27286
    Equus Keepus Brokus



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep. 11, 2003
    Location
    Nuevo Mexico
    Posts
    4,253

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pintopiaffe View Post
    Funny that you're calling orchard junk hay. Up here Orchard/Timothy is PRIME hay...
    Ditto! All the horses at my farm get Orchard Grass (some along with Alfalfa, most of them just the Orchard). My vet actually asked for my hay dealer's phone number recently, as it's the best grass hay he's seen in this area. It's nice hay and it's certainly not cheap around here! The air ferns in my barn are in excellent weight/health on Orchard and little to no concentrates.

    Wanted to mention also that Triple Crown does make 100% Timothy cubes. I've found that a lot of stores only stock the 50/50 and the straight Alfalfa, but if they can get those, they can also order the Timothy by request. It is a little pricier.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov. 22, 2003
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    7,136

    Default

    Horses need FUEL to keep warm. There is no coincidence in "calories" being a unit of heat. Horses "burn" calories to crete body heat. Also, body fat provides some insulation to the vital internal organs. There's no harm in horses having more "insulation" during cold weather. We put on jackets; you can put a "jacket" of body fat on your horse. It also gives you a margin in case your horse loses weight for some reason.

    Corn is a traditional heat-producing grain to feed in the winter.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2001
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    Packing my bags
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    30,671

    Default

    I heard Barley is...oh well
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2003
    Posts
    18,472

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    "Corn is a traditional heat-producing grain to feed in the winter."

    -

    True.. but not a good choice for an IR horse!
    "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
    ---
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Feb. 10, 2006
    Location
    Middle of Nowhere, take a right, FL
    Posts
    4,419

    Default

    Actually corn is not a heat producer it costs energy to burn it. Forage i.e. hay is the the heat producing food. For IR horses you have to watch their diets and unless you have a long supply of TESTED hay you will probably have to keep them blanketed well so they don't have to burn calories to keep warm. To test if you blanket is keeping them warm enough put your hand inside and it should be nice and warm (without sweating). If it is cool then your horse needs a heavier blanket for that weather.
    Every mighty oak was once a nut that stood its ground.

    Proud Closet Canterer! Member Riders with Fibromyalgia clique.



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