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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan. 8, 2006
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    B.C. Canada
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    Default Rescue thought

    Ok, here's the thing.
    Over the years I've considered on and off adopting a horse. I have the space.
    So I go and look every once in awhile, and read the adoption contracts.

    This is where I get turned off, and decide no.

    So and so rescue has the right to come onto your property (or wherever you keep the horse) and if they decide they don't like where the horse is - they can remove it immediately.


    1/ I dislike people who want to come visit unannounced. I work nights, I do horse stuff most the day and have kids, horses, dogs, cats, etc. And I try to fit sleep in there too.

    2/ I think we are all very subjective on our ideas of horse-keeping. This is the big one for me, how do I know said person wandering unannounced by, holds the same views on horse keeping as I do? I don't.

    3/ you can't sell/pass on the horse to someone else.

    4/ many have no breed contracts (this one isn't one that hugely bugs me, but I do have broodies around- but don't produce every year)


    So being that rescues etc or overrun, I decided eh, maybe I 'll look again. Same drill. Turned me off. Maybe I'm alone? I find the overall fairly constrained ideals set forth by rescues keeps me away from them - when I have healthy horses, tons of room, etc.

    I get a lot of it is to sort through the crazies.. meh. *frustrated sometimes by it*
    I'd seriously consider adopting, but the in my face 'control issues' keep steering me away.
    Quote Originally Posted by ExJumper View Post
    Sometimes I'm thrown off, sometimes I'm bucked off, sometimes I simply fall off, and sometimes I go down with the ship. All of these are valid ways to part company with your horse.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    May. 6, 2006
    Location
    Warren County, NJ
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    3,610

    Default

    I can understand it from both ways.
    Rescues really have the best for the horse in mind and most mean it in the best way possible. Their idea of not breeding is understandable from their point of view as there are already so many unwanted horse, no need to breed even more.

    But you have a point too really.

    If I were you, I'd forget about adopting or checking the rescues but save a needy horsey directly from auction, like going to New Holland-type auctions, there you will surely come across needy sweethearts. That's probably the right way for you.

    Good luck .



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan. 25, 2001
    Posts
    1,354

    Default

    I don't really have a problem with their rules. Think about it from their perspective. They've just rescued a horse from a horrible situation...starvation, neglect, abuse...and they are just protecting the poor horse from landing in a similar situation again.

    It doesn't matter if they want to see the facility the horse is going to. If you run a nice, safe barn -- and it sounds like you do -- the "inspection" will go just fine. And maybe they'll get some ideas on horse management that they could pass on to some other future adopter.

    The rule about not selling or passing the horse on is probably a way to keep people from adopting them out and then sending them to slaughter to put a few hundred bucks in their pockets.

    The rule about not breeding to me is a no-brainer. Every day these rescue organizations see how there are too many horses needing homes, so why add to that population? YOU may be responsible, but how many threads have we read where people bring a horse home and breed them because the babies are cute or they like their color? I've seen horses at our annual Horse Fair that bring their BLM mustang "stallions" and promote them for breeding. Excuse me? But weren't these horses culled because there are too many of them...and you want to breed more?

    It sounds like you are a very caring person who would give a horse a good home, so just view these rules as if they weren't really intended for someone like you...but rather someone who isn't an experienced horse owner, who might look at it as a cheap way to start an "income stream" (either slaughter or train/sell), and/or would breed it. Don't take their rules so personally and just give a horse a good home.
    "Dreams are the touchstone of our characters." Henry David Thoreau
    Touchstone Farm
    www.bytouchstonefarm.com



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep. 1, 2004
    Location
    north of Atlanta GA
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    3,751

    Default

    First of all, that is great that you want to take on a needy horse. Instead of getting a horse from a rescue, read your local Craig's list. You will eventually see some poor horse that needs some help for sale at a cheap price. Or you could contact you animal control folks or ag. dept. and let them know you are willing to take on a needy horse. Maybe you could go to your local horse auction and rescue some horse bound for Mexico or Canada. There are other options out there that don't come with strings attached. Good luck. Its really a rewarding experience to help out a horse that needs some love and groceries.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul. 27, 2005
    Location
    Mississippi
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    3,033

    Default

    Same Here!

    I would call our local rescue every once in a while to see if they even had any horses. They never did but I think in reality the people answering the phone had no idea. Finally they set up a separate site for horses.

    I told them if they had a list to put me on I was looking for a pony and I could take ducks and chickens. They have no list and I am not going to call them once a month to check in. Too late now I found a pony via word of mouth.

    Other rescues I have looked into from other states have such high standards I don't think my place would be approved. So many free horses out there now why bother going through a rescue. Sadly I think that is what it comes down to.

    I understand why they have the rules they have but it can be a turn off for those that already have horses. Seems like the list of requirements are geared for non horsey people.

    I have always figured any cheap horse you bring home is a rescue!
    No hour of life is wasted that is spent in the saddle. ~Winston Churchill



  6. #6
    Join Date
    May. 6, 2006
    Location
    Warren County, NJ
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    3,610

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MSP
    I have always figured any cheap horse you bring home is a rescue!
    Very true and I personally even go as far as saying any horse you own and care for until his/her last breath is a rescue regardless of how cheap or expensive he/she was.

    I have a horsey that was more on the expensive side which soon after purchase came up with issues and -of course you never know for sure- but as he was marketed as 'competitive' I dread to think what would have become of him if he had ended up in a true competitive home. So I'd even go as far as calling these guys a rescue in some way.

    To the OP I forgot to add, sounds like you are a very caring person and kuddos for considering looking into a less fortunate horsey, I hope one such horse may be the lucky critter to find its way to you.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2005
    Location
    Lorena, Texas
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    Default

    If you find a horse at a rescue you like but are turned off by the contract, my advice is to talk to them about it.

    For example, we don't allow breeding of our horses. However we've adopted horses out to people who do breed as riding horses, companions, whatever. They agree not to breed the horse they adopt out, and that's fine.

    We also have the clause about unannounced visits. HOWEVER, in the 10 years I've been doing rescue, I've actually used that clause twice. And once was when the person refused to schedule a routine visit and once was when the foster home was starving the horses.

    So if you find a horse you like, talk to the rescue. And then talk to people in the area to see if they know the rescue and know anyone who has had problems with them. That's probably going to tell you more about the rescue than anything - and should let you know whether or not they're trustworthy.

    I think good rescues are becoming more flexible in their contracts. In ours, we have set up means for an adopter to rehome their adopted horse - as long as the new home is willing to sign an adoption agreement with us. We won't charge the new home an adoption fee as long as the horse goes straight from the old adopter to the new one. I know this isn't a perfect system, but we're testing it out and will make revisions as needed.

    Now, there are other rescues who are either too new or too zealous and see danger everywhere. Unfortunately, there are some really bad ones out there that make everyone look bad. *sigh*
    Visit us at Bluebonnet Equine Humane Society - www.bluebonnetequine.org

    Want to get involved in rescue or start your own? Check out How to Start a Horse Rescue - www.howtostartarescue.com



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb. 21, 2008
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    716

    Default

    Another thing I have found that some rescues do that I don't necessarily agree with is limit the job that an adoptee can do. There is abuse and wonderful care in every sport, and no matter what sport I was doing, I would always take excellent care of my horses. I adopted my first mare and really wanted to hunt with her after I began hunting, but could not because I was bound to the adopting contract. There were other job limitations as well. All in all, this was an amazing horse and I would never give up the experience of owning her, but I would most likely adopt again if I could hunt on the horse, because that is mainly what I do now (although I did 'rescue' two horses to hunt on directly out of iffy situations).
    As to the OP's case, I would definitely search the local craigslist/newspaper/auctions for a needy soul...Thank you for being so kind, if only every horse person were as willing and able to care for a needy soul!
    It's psychosomatic. You need a lobotomy. I'll get a saw.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2002
    Location
    PA, where the State motto is: "If it makes sense, we don't do it!".
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    Default

    Raine, I completely understand where you're coming from in regards to certain restrictions some rescues place on their adoptees. I can understand their need to control where the horse/pony goes but some of them can just be over the top.

    You might keep looking for a rescue that's not so restrictive. We have a rescue in the U.S. that doesn't have a breeding restriction and will give you the title to the horse after you have had it for a couple years and have shown you're a good owner.

    That said--there are tons of horses out there looking for homes in the U.S., I would guess it's that way with Canada too. Ask around, I'm sure there is a good horse that is headed for an auction that could be coming to you instead. Ask your vet, your farrier, your horse friends, etc. There are needy horses everywhere, one that needs you to catch it before it falls through the cracks!

    Good luck!
    "Happiness equals reality minus expectations." ~Tom Magliozzi~ of the infamous duo, Click and Clack Tappet, Car Talk hosts. RIP, Tom 6/28/37-11/3/14



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan. 8, 2006
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    B.C. Canada
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    Default

    Yeah I get the rules to weed out the people who may not be able to care for a horse.
    I just find them all a bit too over the top for me. Maybe I will just try talking to them in person.
    I think I'm a bit afraid to dip my toe in, is more my issue. The last time I asked I was looking at bringing a saddlebred up from an adoption place in the states. I offered to send pictures of my place, since obviously living here .it's a bit far for them to come 'visit it'.

    No. Plus there was a softly veiled 'well you probably will send it to slaughter, since it's legal there. Which I took exception too. Plus that's just dumb and rather insulting, I'm going to pay and adoption fee and commercial transport for that.. ok.

    I've purchased auction horses before, although at the moment I only have 1 of them here,I decided he was for me.

    The rest I trained /showed em for a season or two and then sold them onto other homes over the years, a few have gone out as companions for friends 'solo' horses. etc. Not too many, I usually only have time amongst all the other horses to maybe pick up an auction horse once every couple of years.
    Quote Originally Posted by ExJumper View Post
    Sometimes I'm thrown off, sometimes I'm bucked off, sometimes I simply fall off, and sometimes I go down with the ship. All of these are valid ways to part company with your horse.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul. 28, 2004
    Location
    Central New York State
    Posts
    1,458

    Default

    Hi Rainchyldes,

    Not sure where you reside in Canada, but I know there are some auctions in Kitchener.

    I volunteer my time and provide assistance to a lot of rescues. I also have the NY killpen 20 minutes from my home. From a private persons angle I completely understand the feelings of not being in total agreement with some of the restrictions some rescues mandate. On the other hand, having pulled many, many horses from the killpen and my involvement with rescues (contact through the auctions) I also understand the reasons why rescues mandate restrictions- it's done to protect the horses future.

    Here's some suggestions similar to what others have already said- if you know of any auctions/sales in your vicinity scope them out. It's possible that you could save one from being a european dinner right in your vicinity. The Craigslist ads thought- another good one. There's so many horses advertised in need of good loving homes and one step away from being starved or toted off to a sale, intercepting one that way would work. You could also get ahold of Christy at AC4H as she attends the New Holland auction every Monday. Give her a description of what it is your interested in, how much you're willing to pay. If something goes through she could grab a snapshot on her cell phone and send it to you. Of course bear in mind that intercepting one at New Holland could be more costly (hauling/vaccs/coggins/quarantine if needed) but all viable options that would get you off the hook of the restrictions. And last but not least- the NY killpen is close to my residence. Again- if there's something specific your interested in let me know. I can check the killpen to see if anything fitting the bill ends up there. Of course that would also inflate your cost as the hauling, coggins and health certs. would need to be done to ship to Canada.

    Do remember though that there are great many horses in the classifieds/craigs list ads that are just in a time crunch from being close to an auction/sale. That merits a "save" equally, imo. Hope you find something, you sound like you have a good home to offer, experience and TLC to give.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    May. 16, 2008
    Posts
    581

    Default

    I agree with the OP and with Marli. You don't have to go through a rescue to rescue a horse.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr. 7, 2005
    Location
    summerville GA
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    3,219

    Default

    I as a rescue agree wholeheartedly with Cowgirl Jenn. Talk to the rescue. I have a standard set of rules for the rescues, but.....................how do I logically tell someone who adopts a yearling from me that they will never own it, can never sell it etc. etc. I dont do that at all. If you get a yearling, please, you own it. Make your work count, I have already checked you out and if you must or feel the need to sell it, I only ask that you do your homework as well.

    Do you have safe fences???????????? I am not looking for vinyl fancy farms. I cant afford them myself.

    Unannounced drop ins, not here for sure. Unless you give me a reason to be worried.

    If a rescue cant or wont work with you, if they are so rigid they cant bend the rules for the individual horse, then yes, go elsewhere. But, even I have adopted out one horse for breeding purposes. Yes, with a very specific contract but...................... she had little value any other way and was from superb bloodlines, and was guaranteed her retirement home after one baby. A fantastic stallion was used, all vetting as necessary and I adore the little guy who came from this. Mom is in a wonderful home.

    But, there are many many more places these days to rescue a horse from than a farm that says rescue. You are still helping.
    Our horses are not seen as the old and disabled they may have become, but rather as the mighty steeds they once believed themselves to be.

    Sunkissed Acres Rescue and Retirement



  14. #14
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    Feb. 7, 2005
    Location
    Lancaster, PA
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    Default

    I understand what you mean, as I feel the same way. I COMPLETELY understand, respect, and love the work that rescues do. But the contracts just aren't for me. When I'm ready to buy a horse, I'll be going the route of finding one in need via auction, broker, directly from the track, or sites such as Craigslist or the giveaways here on COTH. There are plenty of 'other' ways to rescue without adopting through an organization.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2000
    Location
    El Paso, TX
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    13,016

    Default

    Not all rescues have those rules. The one I volunteer for will call before home visits, to set up an appt. We also will allow the horse to be sold, but just want to check out the new owner to be sure it is not to a dealer/Killer buyer, and that the horse will be safe.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Feb. 11, 2008
    Location
    MD
    Posts
    34

    Default

    As noted not all rescues are the same. Check around. We adopted from a local rescue and our contract allows us to sell the pony. We don't have home vists etc. We did have to provide references etc. As much as we love the pony, she is ready for a child now. The rescue knows we hope to sell her this spring. We hope to make enough money to donate to the rescue and/or adopt another.

    Adopting from a rescue also had advantages. Pony was given excellent vet care after she was rescued. We knew what we were getting.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Oct. 6, 2005
    Location
    NJ
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GilbertsCreeksideAcres View Post
    I agree with the OP and with Marli. You don't have to go through a rescue to rescue a horse.
    I know, it can't be that hard to find a horse that needs a better home. Go to a racetrack trailing a lead line and you'll get a horse attached before you even know it. However, if you want a horse that has been vetted and ridden (hopefully) you need to go to a rescue.

    If you don't need to ride it, go to an auction and "save" one yourself. There's nothing like seeing those ribs and butt fill out and the coming back to life of a depressed starved horse.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
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    42,373

    Default

    One avenue to help horses in need is to let your vet or several vets in the area know and they will direct anyone with a horse they can't care for any more to you.

    There are many, many people in that situation around, always have been, but it seems there are many more today.

    That is where most of the horses we have rehabilitated came from, word of mouth, someone knew a horse that needed help, except we didn't use to call that "rescuing".

    Wherever you get your horse from, be sure you have some kind of written proof that it is your horse now, like a bill of sale, other than any standard contracts, if you get them from an organization like a rescue.

    Don't dismiss putting some time helping your local rescue.
    There you will learn oh so much about what those horses need and will open your eyes more than anything to what is needed in your area.
    Then you will be the one to come here give advice to the rest of us, as those running rescues today do.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2002
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    PA, where the State motto is: "If it makes sense, we don't do it!".
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    Default

    I always thought that it was much better to take in a horse that was about to lose its home rather than buying a horse at an auction like New Holland.

    First of all, most of the time the owner has had the horse long enough that the horse's "history" is pretty much known (illnesses, preferences, training, etc.). We hope that the owners were diligent about treating any health issues, deworming and has kept the horse fed. If you're lucky enough to get a horse through word of mouth quite often other people have known the past owners and this horse much of its life so that if the horse has been passed around someone knows its background too. When you buy a horse at auction quite often the person who brings the horse to the auction is not the owner, doesn't even really know the owner and has no idea about what this horse has done or been through (and quite often the horse is in bad shape--health and weight wise).

    I'm not saying don't ever buy a horse at an auction but you have to realize you are, most times, buying a pig in a poke. You have no idea if this horse has an untreatable problem or is a maniac, etc.

    I would definitely ask around to see if there is a horse in need before resorting to an auction. Most times that is where that displaced horse is headed it's just that you get to it before a middleman gets involved, muddies the waters (so to speak) and jacks up the price....

    Yes, if you do take on a horse from someone don't forget to get that person to sign an agreement that states they are reliquishing any and all rights to the horse, put in the horse's name and a detailed description of the horse. Both parties sign and date the agreement and have a disinterested third party witness the transaction. The last thing you need is someone coming back to you in a couple of years claiming they just leased the horse to you.
    "Happiness equals reality minus expectations." ~Tom Magliozzi~ of the infamous duo, Click and Clack Tappet, Car Talk hosts. RIP, Tom 6/28/37-11/3/14



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Nov. 9, 2005
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    uk
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rainechyldes View Post
    Ok, here's the thing.
    Over the years I've considered on and off adopting a horse. I have the space.
    So I go and look every once in awhile, and read the adoption contracts.

    This is where I get turned off, and decide no.

    So and so rescue has the right to come onto your property (or wherever you keep the horse) and if they decide they don't like where the horse is - they can remove it immediately.

    they do that to make sure the horse isnt going go backwards ie back to how he once was by not being looked after properly its a rescue normal course of action
    normally quarterly checks are made by an welfare agent or an inspector of a society
    like ilph or bhs for us in uk or rspca
    its to protect the horses interest so he can be re homed or go back to the the rescue so the horse has a permanant place to go to if need be


    1/ I dislike people who want to come visit unannounced. I work nights, I do horse stuff most the day and have kids, horses, dogs, cats, etc. And I try to fit sleep in there too.

    they come unannounced so you as in general, as checked to make sure the horse is safe
    once they are happy with you the checks get longer with more time intervals



    2/ I think we are all very subjective on our ideas of horse-keeping. This is the big one for me, how do I know said person wandering unannounced by, holds the same views on horse keeping as I do? I don't.

    all welfare officers of any rescue which is offical score a horse and can tell if that horse is being fed if in doubt then they will call a vet, and as your rights they have to be accompanied by a police officer so that human and animal rights are both addressed
    but if the horse isnt being well cared for they are the owners of the animal have full power of returned which if in a court of law youhavent looked after said horse as to welfare expectations - then you mya be prosecuted

    just becuase you know how to do the basics horse care doesnt mean that in a year time you might find yourself in a financal mess- forexsample no one can fore tell the future

    if the horse needs medical care for istance and far to much for you to pay then again
    the resuce would take him back or make the decision of what to do next
    to be on the right side of a rescued horse from a rescued centre then you have to keep the communication open

    3/ you can't sell/pass on the horse to someone else.

    no you cant he would and should be micro chipped and be deemed the property of the rescue some charge a yearly rate some charge a deposit some ask for a donation some dont
    but the horse belongs to the rescue and not to you so if you sold him it would be fraud by deception so a criminal charge


    4/ many have no breed contracts (this one isn't one that hugely bugs me, but I do have broodies around- but don't produce every year)

    no becuase all paperwork werethey have them or not belongs to the rescue
    your the keeper not the owner this where passports help the horse the owner and the keeper of the horse

    So being that rescues etc or overrun, I decided eh, maybe I 'll look again. Same drill. Turned me off. Maybe I'm alone? I find the overall fairly constrained ideals set forth by rescues keeps me away from them - when I have healthy horses, tons of room, etc.

    horse rescues are over run for many reasons - mostly the horse being neglected
    and dumped and as people cant afford them its the same for any animal rescue
    the work they do they need donations and help as there are like you said many horses
    and many animals that arnt even lucky enough to be in a rescue but in a bad envivroment



    I get a lot of it is to sort through the crazies.. meh. *frustrated sometimes by it*
    I'd seriously consider adopting, but the in my face 'control issues' keep steering me away.
    its not control issue
    its making sure the horse gets whats required do that and theres no problem

    if you that bothered then buy one from a market or two as thye go cheap there
    if you cant afford to spend loads of money then market or as some say kill pen
    whatever is your next best option
    you might have the land, thats ok but any horse need full support and back up of a vet and a farrier as well as general welfare and mamangement which is a 365 day twice aday at least commiment

    thats what you got to realise aswell



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