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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr. 19, 2004
    Location
    Williamstown, MA USA
    Posts
    1,110

    Default Off shoot of hidden electric dog wire - ?

    Our property is basically 4 acres of marble ledge.

    Bhuie, our Lab, needs a contained area, and I was wondering if electric horse fencing would work, using the stepin fiberglas posts and hot wire. The wire would be strung low enough that she couldn't dig under, and strands would be fairly close together. She has hit electric fencing before and it impressed her! Don't know what kind of charger I'd use, but it would need to be pretty strong. This would be cheaper than the hidden wire, I think.

    Has anyone done this? What would be the pros and cons, in your opinion?
    Form follows function, or does function follow form?

    www.clearvisionequine.com

    http://clearvisionequine.blogspot.com



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2000
    Location
    El Paso, TX
    Posts
    12,191

    Default

    It would probably work, but I would just use the Petsafe wireless containment sys, that gives them a 90' radius to move in. Cheaper and easier.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec. 4, 2002
    Posts
    2,535

    Default

    Yes, we had a dog confined behind electric wire. IMO, it will depend on the dog how well it works; worked for our dog. Actually, we accidentally discovered it would work...we had a field fenced for calves, so the wires were lower and spaced for calves; dog got loose in there, and it stayed in there...so, we used it for a dog pen when there weren't any calves!



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    39,978

    Default

    At least it is better than the buried wire, that won't keep other critters away from your dog.

    The idea of fencing generally is to protect the dog from others that may bother it, as much as protect the dog from what can happen wandering off on it's own without supervision.

    We use 16' x 6' chain link panels with connectors from one to the other.
    They were a big investment many years ago but they can be added to, taken off and moved around to fit any configuration we want to make the yard be.
    We have used them against the house, the garage, around the garden.
    Being portable is the best of all.

    Right now, thinking we are very much set for many years, we even added a concrete edge below them and I am glad, as we are getting wild pigs around the house now and may could have rooted under the panels.

    They sell those dog run panels at most farm supply houses and they are very reasonable.
    You can keep adding panels as you can and need.

    We had many years ago, before the panels, one aussie that would climb the old wire we had and walk on the top board, then jump off.
    We did add two hot wires low and medium height to keep her in and it worked fine.

    You would not be out much to try the wire fence, sounds like a good idea to try.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2008
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    794

    Default

    It works very well. I have used it for 10 yrs now. I have four strand and it covres 3/4 of an acre. I have never had a dog get out. This is also what was used at the kennel I buy my Dobes from for the most part. They trust it with their very expensive dogs. I keep three Dobes, a beagle and a chow x in mine. I go out and pick the poo every day. Very good dog fence in my opinion. I have wooden posts.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct. 25, 2007
    Posts
    3,541

    Default

    Although they advertize it as buried, when Invisible Fence did my property, I had areas that they were not able to get a ditch witch through, so they asked if they could hang it or in some cases lay it on the ground(in areas the horses did not go).
    So, my fence follows the horse fence and for the most part, except under the driveway, it is attached to the horse fence.
    It does not prevent other dogs/coyotes from getting in but it is an option.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep. 24, 2002
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    249

    Default

    I had considered this an option for our dog who was digging under our chain link fence, but was told that since part of our yard was not mowable, the long grass touching the electric wire would cause it to short out and it wouldn't work. is this true?
    ~I didn't say it was your fault. I said I was blaming you.~



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2008
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    794

    Default

    Jeez, if there wasn't so much snow I'd go take a pic for you. Ideally, yes, the better you keep the brush, grass, out from under your electric fence the better shock it will give. The dog fence here is a separate fence than the horses but is attached. Same fencer. The horse part is mostly kept up beneath but does have sections through a marshy area that has vegetation and the dog fence is only weekwhacked a couple of times a summer. There is always grass and whatnot touching it. And I can sure tell ya that you get a shock from it, I always seem to touch the darn thing somewhere. I would do the best you can and not worry too much. I would not just let it grow and do nothing. Just saying I wouldn't let it be a constant worry. Whack it down a couple times a yr what you can. It shouldn't be allowed to ground out on a sapling, bigger stuff. You likely have horses and know that stuff anyhow. I have very good luck, would not use it if I had any doubts , I will NOT let my dogs run, never.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr. 19, 2004
    Location
    Williamstown, MA USA
    Posts
    1,110

    Default

    Thanks so much, everyone! I think the hotwire for Bhuie is doable with the fiberglas posts. Chainlink would be wonderful, but the area is 1/2 acre on that slab, and on a steep hill.

    It'll be reasonable to afford, since I have so much surplus fencing material lying around. Instead of the solar charger, I'll go w/ an electric. Should produce a pretty good whap for my little bolter!

    If it works well for her, I might just get another dog as a playmate.... might have to get a new hubby, tho.
    Form follows function, or does function follow form?

    www.clearvisionequine.com

    http://clearvisionequine.blogspot.com



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr. 1, 2008
    Posts
    4,536

    Default

    if the dog hits the hot wire with the nose you are good to go, if s/he ducks under and the hair coat hits it, not so much. Hair is a good electrical insulator. Hot wires were made for livestock who generally explore their environment by touching with a nose, dogs don't always sniff things first.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr. 1, 2008
    Posts
    4,536

    Default

    "Chainlink would be wonderful, but the area is 1/2 acre on that slab, and on a steep hill."

    Chainlink was too expensive for me, so I went with welded wire panels and landscape timbers.

    http://tinyurl.com/a6pegy

    16 feet long, sturdy enough that I needed posts on each end and one in the middle, did not need any in the corners and did the whole yard for about $200



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr. 19, 2004
    Location
    Williamstown, MA USA
    Posts
    1,110

    Default

    Welded wire could go on t-posts, right? Then run a hotwire inside near bottom to discourage digging under.

    Still might be a challenge on the steep slope, but promising.

    Thanks.
    Form follows function, or does function follow form?

    www.clearvisionequine.com

    http://clearvisionequine.blogspot.com



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    39,978

    Default

    Most kind of woven wire will cost much less than welded wire.
    They sell different gauges and weaves by the roll and they can be used over uneven ground.

    One local broodmare farm built their pens out of welded wire and after many years of injuries to the horses, pulled it all out and replaced it with pipe fences and panels.
    If you have horses around, I would not try to use that wire.
    For dogs, it would be fine, if the dog is not a jumper or if you can add hot wires to it to keep it off the fence.

    I would think that rolls of regular woven wire would cost much less than welded wire, if you are adding hot wire anyway.

    Most hardware stores and farm stores carry those, TSC, Home Depot, Loewes, etc.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr. 1, 2008
    Posts
    4,536

    Default

    woven wire will work if you don't mind more posts. My choice was because the welded wire was sturdy enough that the corners held themselves and I could train up vegatation to help block vision of what was on the other side. I chose to use it to train up grape vines too. Woven wire would not stand up to that kind of growth.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug. 26, 2001
    Location
    Oxford PA
    Posts
    10,337

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fivehorses View Post
    Although they advertize it as buried, when Invisible Fence did my property, I had areas that they were not able to get a ditch witch through, so they asked if they could hang it or in some cases lay it on the ground(in areas the horses did not go).
    So, my fence follows the horse fence and for the most part, except under the driveway, it is attached to the horse fence.
    It does not prevent other dogs/coyotes from getting in but it is an option.
    Thank you. This answered a question I wondered about. We have 20 acres. My husband is not a dog person but eventually I'd like to get another dog. Almost all of the circumference of our farm has "no climb" which would keep most dogs in, but there is the front gate (which is open during the day) & a portion of one side which is 3 board oak. I have wondered whether I could attach an "underground wire dog fence" to the horse fence (of course, putting the dog wire under the driveway) so the dog could have the run of the whole place. Sounds like I could.

    Anyone have an estimate of the cost? It's about 3,600 feet.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Mar. 9, 2006
    Posts
    1,830

    Default

    Yes, you can string the wire for a radio dog fence from the horse fence.

    I believe a typical fence kit comes with 20 gauge wire. Since your wire would be exposed to the elements, and you have a longer run than a typical suburban backyard, I'd spring for a heavy duty kit with 18 gauge wire. The starter kit is in the ballpark of $250. 500 foot spools of 18 gauge wire run around $30-$35 each.



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