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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jun. 30, 2005
    Posts
    2,185

    Default

    A lady down the road did that for her pastures and it looks terrible. You can tell that they are landscape posts/rails and it doen't look sturdy to me at all. I wouldn't do it my self.



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jul. 14, 2003
    Location
    Rhode Island
    Posts
    1,850

    Default

    We used 4 x 4 pressure treated for posts and some corners, with T-Posts( capped) in between and woven livestock fencing. We've since found a source for used telephone poles that are wonderful as corner posts and a now and then post between the Tposts. we buried them about 5-6' down and they're goin' nowhere! Our original turnout areas were done in cedar and that's about 30 years ago. Some have fared better than others, but most seem still useable as we replace them. We didn't reuse them, but they were in not too bad shape.



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Nov. 4, 2003
    Location
    Sanger, TX, USA
    Posts
    4,977

    Default

    Nope, we don't recommend them at all. Have seen way too many installs using them
    with warped posts. They are not nearly as strong as 4-inch or better posts and round
    fence posts are stronger than square fence posts of the same diameter--has something
    to do with the growth rings.



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Mar. 4, 2008
    Location
    Birmingham, AL
    Posts
    1,631

    Default

    I also do not recommend them. They tend to warp and aren't very strong. I strongly believe in doing something right the first time and using these will result in needing to replace posts considerably sooner and spend more money than if you did it right in the first place. We have them here but did not put them in. They are breaking off at the ground and just weak. The nail-in type insulators do not stay in them as well either (kinda soft). For all the new fencing we are using 4"x6' or 4"x8' and are put in using a post driver. Corner posts are 6"x8' with braces. Very strong and no need for concrete. They are round but it is not a problem nailing in insulators and they do lay flat on the surface.
    Altamont Sport Horses
    Trakehners * Knabstruppers * Appaloosa Sport Horses
    Home of stallions: Ambrosius af Asgard "Atlantis" & Hollywood Hot Spot
    Birmingham, AL



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Feb. 20, 2006
    Posts
    135

    Default Don't do it!

    Ours are rotting after about 6 years. Hubby regrets using them. Most recent fence is made from 6-8" 8ft fence posts. Lots more expensive, but will outlast many times over.

    SD



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Nov. 3, 2008
    Posts
    353

    Default

    I went the landscape tie route once too, and ended up replacing those posts shortly after due to rot.

    I have to say though, I worked for parks one summer and was given the task of repairing an old split cedar fence. Out of about 2km of fencing we only replaced a few posts, and those were mostly ones that had been broken by falling trees. Records indicated the fence was built in the 1930's when the park was a farm! The property was donated in the 50's so there certainly wasnt any maintenance after that till we tackled it - the size of the trees growing around and through it are testament to that. It appeared the posts had the bottoms burnt before planting them, not sure if thats what kept them so strong? Too bad my horses have a taste for cedar, it'd only have about a 5 min lifespan round here



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Aug. 22, 2002
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    1,712

    Default

    We have used them very successfully with hot tape. I have some that have been in the ground for ten years and look just fine.



  8. #28
    Join Date
    May. 5, 2000
    Location
    Aiken, SC
    Posts
    2,377

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RioTex View Post
    We have used them very successfully with hot tape. I have some that have been in the ground for ten years and look just fine.

    Mine are over ten years old as well (see earlier post). None have rotted or broken. Well, except the one I ran over with the tractor.

    I did make sure that the ones I used were pressure treated just like lumber is and not surface treated. Maybe that is the diff. between ours and everyone here saying they are bad.



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