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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec. 1, 2005
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    673

    Default Ever have a riding lesson like this?

    www.equusvilla.blogspot.com

    One of my friends came to watch and photograph a lesson I took on a young horse. It was cold and very windy ...and the last 15 minutes of my lesson was a real show! ...and no - I did not come off of him!



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov. 10, 2006
    Location
    Southern Finger Lakes of NY
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    1,736

    Default

    I'm glad you didn't come off.

    Now I'd like to see the horse checked for pain-- teeth, ulcers, and most importantly, saddle fit. One-sided misbehavior is often a sign of pain.

    Good luck with him; he looks quite handsome.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec. 1, 2005
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    673

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bayou Roux View Post
    I'm glad you didn't come off.

    Now I'd like to see the horse checked for pain-- teeth, ulcers, and most importantly, saddle fit. One-sided misbehavior is often a sign of pain.

    Good luck with him; he looks quite handsome.
    Opps - you must have missed the post prior to the lesson photos. He has had his teeth floated, been completely vet checked, seen a EQ. chiropractor and massage therapst (just 1 week prior to this lesson) and he also has mulitiple pads beneath the saddle - recommended by the massage therapst. I really do appreciate the suggestions though :0)



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr. 8, 2004
    Location
    The Great, uh, Green (?!?!) North!
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    4,262

    Default

    Ohhhh.... my trainer has one like that. Nothing wrong with her, saddle was fine. She was just being a mare who didn't. want. to. do. it.

    Then she reared, stayed up, and fell over to the side (no one got hurt thankfully), and seems to have scared herself into good behaviour.
    "Adulthood? You're playing with ponies. That is, like, every 9 year old girl's dream. Adulthood?? You're rocking the HELL out of grade 6, girl."



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul. 5, 2007
    Location
    Beside Myself ~ Western NY
    Posts
    12,217

    Default

    Man, you ARE a glutton for punishment! There is no WAY I'd come over here with those pics!!!

    Although, there have been many times when I wished I have photographic evidence for my own satisfaction. Up until last year, Grey used to do a "Pegasus the flying horse" routine. These guys sure can get a LOT of air.
    ::I do not understand your specific kind of crazy, but I do admire your total commitment to it::



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec. 1, 2005
    Posts
    673

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SmartAlex View Post
    Man, you ARE a glutton for punishment! There is no WAY I'd come over here with those pics!!!

    Although, there have been many times when I wished I have photographic evidence for my own satisfaction. Up until last year, Grey used to do a "Pegasus the flying horse" routine. These guys sure can get a LOT of air.
    Snicker snicker...most horses have their moments!

    Case in point..the lady who takes a lesson after me has the most laid back Quarter Horse ever. I mean everything is almost Slo-Mo! I looked at my teacher and said, "Do you ever think Dominus will be that calm?" She was laughing so hard I almost could not understand her when she pointed out a newer section of fencing. "See that?" she said..."That is where that mare took the bit, took off and crashed through the fence last year!" She then told me that bad behavior is NOT breed specific.

    I am so thankful that this teacher does not believe that bad behavior means evil horse. I think a lot of good horses have just been given up on too easily. My geldings Mama answered a canter cue by leaping the rail and going into the stands, so he comes by it honestly! grin...



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar. 8, 2004
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
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    23,140

    Default

    I agree, no way I would post those pics for all to see. Looks like the poster child for the Darwin award to me.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan. 12, 2009
    Posts
    26

    Default

    Kudos for staying on a riding through it.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec. 1, 2005
    Posts
    673

    Default

    Also - let me brag on what we have accomplished!!

    1. He follows me right into the trailer without someone showing him a whip!
    2. He stands quietly while I mount him from a mounting block, something he was freightened of when we started just 4 weeks ago.
    3. He walks quietly on the lunge line when I ask him to and moves gently away (not jumping into a trot) if I flip the lunge whip at him.
    4. He used to give me all kinds of grief at the trot, now he is working so much better in this gait and the photos you saw were the first time we started working at the canter...although professional trainers have already tought him the cues. I was not 'teaching' him this gait - he was just objecting to doing it on one lead.
    5. This horse runs to me when I go to the gate and is well behaved in the cross ties.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr. 3, 2003
    Location
    Up the creek from bar.ka
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    10,091

    Default

    I don't know why you all say you wouldn't come over here with those pictures?

    It looks like a cute horse acting badly with a novice-ish rider. If people give you crap for a naughty horse outside on a cold windy day then they're lame and shouldn't be listened to anyway and clearly they don't ride enough to know that sometimes horses are just nuts. Not because something is *wrong* with them, but simply because they're horses.

    The pictures made me laugh. Your friend has a nice camera! Your horse is adorable, all fuzzy and naughty!



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec. 1, 2005
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    673

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tidy rabbit View Post
    I don't know why you all say you wouldn't come over here with those pictures?

    It looks like a cute horse acting badly with a novice-ish rider. If people give you crap for a naughty horse outside on a cold windy day then they're lame and shouldn't be listened to anyway and clearly they don't ride enough to know that sometimes horses are just nuts. Not because something is *wrong* with them, but simply because they're horses.

    The pictures made me laugh. Your friend has a nice camera! Your horse is adorable, all fuzzy and naughty!
    Wow! Thanks. That made me smile!



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul. 13, 2006
    Posts
    2,510

    Default

    Well lets see I have 2 guys right now, 1 has been just walking since August because he had a momentary lapse of judgement in turn out, so yeah pretty much everyday looks like that and I am just trying to walk him. The other guy is new, about 3 weeks or so, spent some time at the track but never raced and has been off for like 6 months with not much because of a series of abcess's. He decided the other day that he could indeed walk on his hind legs and decided to prove it to me. Then again on Saturday he was having a ball jumping so decided that bucking would be really fun to throw in while cantering between fences. Good thing I can sit a buck, but geez guys can't I just enjoy the ride from time to time



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct. 19, 2006
    Location
    CNY
    Posts
    77

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tidy rabbit View Post
    I don't know why you all say you wouldn't come over here with those pictures?

    It looks like a cute horse acting badly with a novice-ish rider. If people give you crap for a naughty horse outside on a cold windy day then they're lame and shouldn't be listened to anyway and clearly they don't ride enough to know that sometimes horses are just nuts. Not because something is *wrong* with them, but simply because they're horses.

    The pictures made me laugh. Your friend has a nice camera! Your horse is adorable, all fuzzy and naughty!

    Agreed



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr. 30, 2008
    Location
    SunnybrookeFarms
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    433

    Default

    Bravo for the show and for staying on! And WHY is it that people always assume that if a horse misbehaves he must have teeth/saddle/bit/back or some other issue. Sometimes they are just devils because they can be.

    Is your boy still fairly young? It sounds as if you guys are making wonderful progress, and he is really cute! Stick with him, the naughty boy!
    Just because I talk slow doesn't mean that I actually AM slow.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec. 1, 2005
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    673

    Default

    He is very young...legally only 4 ...in reality 3 1/2.



  16. #16
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    Dec. 1, 2005
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    Default

    Here are some things my instructor told me.

    1. "We have worked together for several years on several different horses and I know what you can handle."...(gave me confidence)

    2. She said, "I could have easily let you off and I could have gotten on him until he behaved...but what would you have learned from that - and what would you have done if he started this when you were riding him at your farm without me there?"

    3. "A lesson is a lesson. They are suppose to only be an hour long - but some horses demand a two hour lesson!"

    I reallllllllly like my teacher! Thank you Kelli..



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jun. 1, 2002
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    14,739

    Default

    My mare didn't go to the right AT ALL. She'd tense up then bolt, run backwards, or spin. I think it was months before she'd canter to the right and that was "clear the ring" worthy. Good job sticking with him and great job for having a trainer there to help you out.

    My suggestions are to get a little unorthodox with him. Do all your work to the left first and do it until he really relaxes. Then make itty bitty turns to the right at the trot while posting on the wrong diagonal. So go right for a stride, then left a bit, then right a bit, then left a bit. So you're sneaking him to the right. Eventually work on the bend to the right. At the canter try picking it up across the diagonal by cantering all the way across the ring, trotting for a stride or two, then getting into it again so you trick him into it.

    Can you feel when he's going to rear and spin him around?

    On a side note, you mentioned him not doing well in training. Have you thought about trying dressage with your saddlebred? There is a lot involved with relaxing, putting the head down, loosening the back, and he might find it more enjoyable.

    This is a saddlebred gelding doing Grand Prix
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3xnBo8ybJpQ



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Dec. 1, 2005
    Posts
    673

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by enjoytheride View Post
    My mare didn't go to the right AT ALL. She'd tense up then bolt, run backwards, or spin. I think it was months before she'd canter to the right and that was "clear the ring" worthy. Good job sticking with him and great job for having a trainer there to help you out.

    My suggestions are to get a little unorthodox with him. Do all your work to the left first and do it until he really relaxes. Then make itty bitty turns to the right at the trot while posting on the wrong diagonal. So go right for a stride, then left a bit, then right a bit, then left a bit. So you're sneaking him to the right. Eventually work on the bend to the right. At the canter try picking it up across the diagonal by cantering all the way across the ring, trotting for a stride or two, then getting into it again so you trick him into it.

    Can you feel when he's going to rear and spin him around?

    On a side note, you mentioned him not doing well in training. Have you thought about trying dressage with your saddlebred? There is a lot involved with relaxing, putting the head down, loosening the back, and he might find it more enjoyable.

    This is a saddlebred gelding doing Grand Prix
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3xnBo8ybJpQ
    Awesome advise..and are you ready??... Kelli is a dressage teacher. One of the things that broke him out of being so afraid of trotting to the right was constant serpentines down the straight away. I think we are headed in the right direction.



  19. #19
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    Jun. 6, 2000
    Location
    Amherst, MA
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    5,877

    Default

    The pictures are amazing. I was puzzled though about the horse's tail: is there something attached to it? I blew some of the pictures up and I couldn't figure out what was at the end of the tail.

    I also wondered, and I don't mean this as a criticism at all, why you're wearing spurs?
    "The formula 'Two and two make five' is not without its attractions." --Dostoevsky



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Aug. 30, 2007
    Location
    Illinois, USA
    Posts
    8,447

    Default

    Haha, I've had a few of THOSE rides before. Go you for showing them to the world.

    If you don't mind me asking, what kinda bit are you using? The reason I ask is I took a couple of Saddleseat lessons, and noticed that nearly every horse went in a COMPLETELY different bit! It was wild, seeing all the bridles on the wall with totally different setups. So now I'm kinda curious what other Saddleseat-ers use!
    Tell a Gelding. Ask a Stallion. Discuss it with a Mare... Pray if it's a Pony!



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