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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Dec. 18, 2006
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    6,366

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bluey View Post
    We didn't have electricity and so no refrigerator or freezers.
    Many years later, after I was gone, still no electricity, I heard they got a propane refrigerator.
    That is why we had to handle food without that option.
    Oh I understand! I can air dry some things here but not until late fall or it is too humid. I've tried air drying basil in the summer and it just wilts and turns black. I've had good luck with drying hot peppers in the house, but again, not until fall. I think my farming grandparents had to rely on mostly canning and pickling, which is fine by me. I consider the "vinegar group" a major building block in the food pyramid.



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Oct. 19, 2006
    Location
    area II
    Posts
    1,623

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    Yes, I blanch before I freeze. I just find them to be a bit rubbery. But MUCH better than canning!
    As for the seeds in january. I LOVE to do lots of colored sweet peppers. To buy as plants, they are unaffordable. So, January it is, or they don't grow big enough before planting time.
    Some of the things that I don't need much of, like hot peppers, or unique types of tomatoes, I just go ahead and buy the plants. One plant is usually about the same price as a packet of seeds!
    Good luck with your garden. We LOVE fresh veggies in the summer.
    And we get lots of visitors taking away food as well.
    And yes, I have been known to hide a zucchini or two in friends cars!



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Oct. 18, 2000
    Posts
    22,489

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    Quote Originally Posted by eventmom View Post
    And yes, I have been known to hide a zucchini or two in friends cars!

    August 8th is the official "Sneak zucchini onto your neighbors porch Day"

    Really.



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    46,950

    Default

    When going to the local post office for the mail, we never lock the vehicles, except in zuchini season.



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Oct. 4, 2003
    Location
    Clinton, BC
    Posts
    1,603

    Default

    I had a large and varied garden at our previous farm. The new farm just got the garden plot put in this past fall, a large raised bed, so I have 5' of black topsoil (chortling in her joy) waiting for my spring plans. I've had good experiences using horse manure in the garden, we had sand paddocks and picked the high quality poop, no sawdust bedding, some sand stuck to horse buns, and piled this in the garden in the fallow areas in the fall. Let it sit over the winter to age. Then spread it, turn it, work it in the spring, and plant. Peas and potatoes are easy, and very rewarding. Plant frost tolerant stuff early. Spinach is good, and will reseed naturally, so you can kinda get a patch going annually if you let it go until it goes to seed. Broccoli is easy, and cold hardy. It will also reseed. Corn is great, it is a heavy feeder, needs lots of fertilizer or manure. Tomatoes are easy usually, but they will wilt with fungus if they get wet in the summer. Best to buy half a dozen already started plants. If you buy a packet of seeds, you will have to split the large number of plants with neighbours, you don't need that many. Squashes of all sorts are easy, and love horse manure. You can plant these right in an aged manure pile. Summer and winter varieties. Nothing much will snack on the plants themselves, the spines on the vines keep things away. Tomatoes and potatoes both have poisonous green growth, so they do not get eaten by most marauding invaders. Raspberries grow like weeds, they are hard to kill and take very little care. Just cut out last years canes, and tie up the new years' growth and trim the tops. Put manure on them in the fall. Asparagus is easy too, the beds are perminent, you can buy mature roots that will produce that year, and produce adequately the next year. Plant some asparagus seeds at the same time as you put the roots in, sometimes the roots they sell are all male plants, and they will die without replacing themselves if you don't have both sexes of plants. The female plants are a bit smaller, but just fine for home use. Cut spears until they are half an inch in diameter, then leave them alone to grow. Asparagus beds need to be covered with manure in the fall, after the plants have been allowed to mature, seed, and die down and you cut the old stalks away. Have fun, I do!! Production of "tonnage" is fun.



  6. #26
    Join Date
    May. 8, 2004
    Posts
    4,426

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    Raspberries, pumpkins and tomatoes love horse manure. Also, planting marigolds around your veggies will help protect them from bugs.



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Oct. 20, 1999
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    14,658

    Default Straw bales

    It's time for Trixie and I to obtain old straw bales and set about encouraging them to rot for our 2009 straw bale garden.

    A better use for composted horse poop I have yet to see!
    "If you would have only one day to live, you should spend at least half of it in the saddle."



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jul. 5, 2007
    Location
    Beside Myself ~ Western NY
    Posts
    9,351

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    Rather than read everyone elses's great advice, I'll just cut straight to the chase (then go back and bask in gardening thoughts).

    #1 grow what you like to eat
    #2 start small and expand later
    #3 plant your carrots beside your tomatoes. They love each other, and you can thin your carrots while you are weeding your tomatoes.
    #4 Plant marigolds everywhere, and basil too. The flowers bring bees and repel bad bugs.
    #5 trellis your cuccumbers
    #6 give your peppers some filtered sunlight. In fact, plant them between your tomatoes.
    #7 the sweetest sweet corn ever is "Gotta Have It" from Gurneys. It makes Silver Queen taste like sawdust.
    #8 If you are going to garden anyway, plant heirloom non-copyrighted varieties. Try Baker Creek Seeds. Save The Planet and the Diversity of our Food Supply... political public service announcement over.
    People are crazy and times are strange.
    I used to care but, things have changed.



  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jul. 5, 2007
    Location
    Beside Myself ~ Western NY
    Posts
    9,351

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    Quote Originally Posted by eventmom View Post

    I do plant beans, but have not yet figured out how to make them taste anything close to fresh when I store them.
    Some of it has to do with the variety, and the maturity at time of picking. I have narrowed my favorite down to Blue Lake Bush, and Goldmine Bush (from Burpee). Pick them very young and tender. I leave them whole, and just snap off the stem end. Blanch for only 3 minutes, rinse immediately with cold water and freeze. When you cook them, get the water to a rolling boil, plop the whole frozen lump in and cover. Leave on Med heat until it just starts to simmer again, drain. You can then leave them steaming in the covered pot for 5-10 minutes while you are finishing up the rest of dinner. Key to it is not to overcook.
    People are crazy and times are strange.
    I used to care but, things have changed.



  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jul. 5, 2007
    Location
    Beside Myself ~ Western NY
    Posts
    9,351

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JSwan View Post
    August 8th is the official "Sneak zucchini onto your neighbors porch Day"
    My husband has learned my "No one leaves the driveway without a zucchini" rule. Not even the UPS driver, or the Jehovah's Witnesses. Last year I only planted one zucchini plant, so we didn't have a problem. But the Jehovah's Witnesses have not been back since.
    People are crazy and times are strange.
    I used to care but, things have changed.



  11. #31
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2001
    Location
    In Jingle Town
    Posts
    35,166

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SmartAlex View Post
    My husband has learned my "No one leaves the driveway without a zucchini" rule. Not even the UPS driver, or the Jehovah's Witnesses. Last year I only planted one zucchini plant, so we didn't have a problem. But the Jehovah's Witnesses have not been back since.


    HAHAHAHAHA, I can just see them making a big detour around your house!

    LOVE IT!
    Quote Originally Posted by Bristol Bay View Post
    Try setting your broomstick to fly at a lower altitude.
    GNU Terry Prachett



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