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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct. 18, 2007
    Posts
    118

    Default Moldy leather

    What are your tips/home remedies for getting moldy leather back to its original luxurious state?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2005
    Location
    Mass.
    Posts
    6,608

    Default

    Bleach. You HAVE to kill the mold or it will just recur. Water down a quarter cup of bleach in a quart of water, scrub all over with a sponge, dry with a towel. Let the leather dry completely for a couple of days to see if you missed any moldy spots, and re-do if necessary.

    Then oil the leather with a good coat of olive oil, let it soak in for a day, and buff with a dry cloth.

    Oil again in a week, and you're all set.

    ETA: Wash the bleach/moldy towel immediately in hot water with more bleach in the washing machine. You don't want to re-use the towel and recontaminate with more mold!
    Last edited by Guin; Jan. 17, 2009 at 08:48 PM.
    I realize that I'm generalizing here, but as is often the case when I generalize, I don't care. ~ Dave Barry



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug. 30, 2007
    Location
    Illinois, USA
    Posts
    8,189

    Default

    Depends on how much mold, in my own experience. One of my saddles got a bit of mold on the billets, so I cleaned it with glycerine spray (Fiebring's to be exact). Then, I set the saddle near a window so the sun could get to the billets. The sun's kind of a natural killer of mold, from what I've heard.
    Tell a Gelding. Ask a Stallion. Discuss it with a Mare... Pray if it's a Pony!



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    40,161

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Guin View Post
    Bleach. You HAVE to kill the mold or it will just recur. Water down a quarter cup of bleach in a quart of water, scrub all over with a sponge, dry with a towel. Let the leather dry completely for a couple of days to see if you missed any moldy spots, and re-do if necessary.

    Then oil the leather with a good coat of olive oil, let it soak in for a day, and buff with a dry cloth.

    Oil again in a week, and you're all set.
    That is what we used, but one cup of bleach to a gallon (same proportions) and most anything to reoil the leather, from pure neatsfoot, Lexol, glycerine soap, just regular leather care.

    The sun will work, just don't overdo it, as it's heat can dry the leather too much.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug. 30, 2007
    Location
    Illinois, USA
    Posts
    8,189

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bluey View Post
    That is what we used, but one cup of bleach to a gallon (same proportions) and most anything to reoil the leather, from pure neatsfoot, Lexol, glycerine soap, just regular leather care.

    The sun will work, just don't overdo it, as it's heat can dry the leather too much.
    If you set it in a cooler room, the saddle/whatever doesn't get real hot. But you're right, best to keep an eye on it.
    Tell a Gelding. Ask a Stallion. Discuss it with a Mare... Pray if it's a Pony!



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov. 22, 1999
    Posts
    816

    Default timely post...

    I have a set of pair harness that I haven't used since retiring my driving horses 9 years ago. Kept it in my trailer dressing room (with vents open) for most of that time and no mold.
    Moved it into my tack room this past summer (which is centrally located in my barn -- no windows -- so apparently very damp) and it is the greenest stuff you have ever seen.

    I actually keep my saddle and bridles out in my aisleway, which is open to the prevailing wind, have very little problem with mold (and of course I actually use the tack), But the harness is disgusting. I don't use it and perhaps never will again but hate to see it in that condition and need to clean it up ( and put it back in my trailer or keep it in the barn aisle with the rest of the tack).

    So had been wondering the same thing -- have never dealt with this problem before.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb. 2, 2007
    Location
    Finland and NJ
    Posts
    2,262

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Guin View Post
    Bleach. You HAVE to kill the mold or it will just recur. Water down a quarter cup of bleach in a quart of water, scrub all over with a sponge, dry with a towel. Let the leather dry completely for a couple of days to see if you missed any moldy spots, and re-do if necessary.

    Then oil the leather with a good coat of olive oil, let it soak in for a day, and buff with a dry cloth.

    Oil again in a week, and you're all set.

    ETA: Wash the bleach/moldy towel immediately in hot water with more bleach in the washing machine. You don't want to re-use the towel and recontaminate with more mold!
    This is what I do, and it works every time.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul. 2, 2003
    Location
    Woodland, Ca
    Posts
    6,182

    Default

    I spray it with Lysol. Then I get out the spray gycerine and a sponge or a towel that I no longer want. Clean the whole thing well. Throw away the sponge or towel. Put the leather in the sun for the afternoon (if possible). Clean again and oil with olive oil. Put bridles in bridle bags with the little packets that come with shoes, or electronics. Put bagged bridles into tack trunk.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct. 17, 2003
    Posts
    907

    Default

    we have used bleach dilution but I have also heard that you might use white vinegar. anyone?



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov. 9, 2005
    Location
    uk
    Posts
    15,268

    Default

    not bleach god that will take more of the tanning out

    you need proper saddle soap like the a glistine bar then wash it but not to much water use a sponge then clean cloth and wipe dry then get some veggie oil heat it up to finger hot
    and then with a sponge or two fingers soak the rough side of the leather or apply to rough side of the leahter warm oil penatrates into the leather then wipe a smear o the top side
    and then leave to dry

    will add if eco leather it will tear and its no good anyways



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar. 6, 2007
    Location
    The Whinnery.
    Posts
    785

    Default

    Ko-cho-line is designed for this very purpose:

    http://www.equishopper.com/p-11830-k...sing-225g.aspx
    "Dressage" is just a fancy word for flatwork



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec. 14, 2008
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    829

    Default

    I use white vinegar on paper towels. Once the leather is dry I oil good. Doesn't seem to come back!



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2005
    Location
    Northeast
    Posts
    10,260

    Exclamation

    If you have the patience to sort through "goeslike stink"'s post. It really is better for your leather.

    Bleach is drastic.
    Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    May. 13, 2004
    Location
    NW CT
    Posts
    837

    Default

    I swear by Bee Natural leather care: http://www.bee-natural.com/

    Their saddle soap is heavy duty -- you can really only use it twice a year, for deep cleaning (if that's what you need to do). Then you follow with their saddle oil with fungicides and finally, the conditioner. The system works.

    Once you've fixed the problem, don't put anything with glycerine -- and definitely not pure glycerine -- on your tack. Glycerine is the perfect petri dish for mildew. It's hard to find saddle soap without it, but worth searching for.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec. 11, 2006
    Location
    MD
    Posts
    115

    Default

    I wouldn't use bleach as it will dry out the leather. I have the white moldy tack problem & I have always used plain vinegar. Vinegar destroys it by changing the PH, making it more resilient to future mold & without damaging the leather. If the mold is a consistant problem, chances are, you'll have to do it again but it will be less often.

    When the weather becomes real cold, we usually bring the tack in the house. Those bits get real cold & not very comforting to the horse.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Aug. 7, 2005
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    2,500

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by merrygoround View Post
    sort through "goeslike stink"'s post. It really is better for your leather.

    Bleach is drastic.
    Goes like stink usually has good ideas to suggest. I appreciate her posts.
    You know why cowboys don't like Appaloosas?" - Answer: Because to train a horse, you have to be smarter than it is.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Nov. 20, 2008
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    2,186

    Default

    My post isn't on getting rid of mold but once cleaned, I put my tack in bridle bags with small mold inhibitor packets inside (like the ones you get in items shipped to you)-you can also buy these packets sometimes in stores-I think they're called dry-rid or something like that. It really helps keep mold from returning so quickly.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Nov. 5, 2002
    Location
    Hometown: San Antonio, TX ; Current Location: Amarillo, TX
    Posts
    1,605

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Creaghgal View Post
    Ko-cho-line is designed for this very purpose:

    http://www.equishopper.com/p-11830-k...sing-225g.aspx
    Word of caution when using Kocholine......

    DO NOT WEAR WHITE BREECHES after using this stuff!!!!!!! You will have baboon butt. It is WONDERFUL for leather but make sure you wipe it off well and wear dark breeches and use a dark pad the first few rides .

    When I put my tack up (i.e. not going to use it for a while) I coat it in the Kocholine and rarely have a problem with mold here in humid icky Texas
    RIP Kid Gloves (Holly) 1992 TBxHanv CCI*** mare.
    http://photobucket.com/tx3dayeventer/holly
    New mare: Miss Bunny Express (Missy) 1995 AQHA Jumper mare.
    http://photobucket.com/tx3dayeventer/missy



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Nov. 22, 2003
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    7,136

    Default

    When this happened to me I used regular creamy orange-ish saddle soap (maybe Fiebings?) and it never came back.



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