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  1. #1
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    Dec. 7, 2001
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    Default why is it so much cheaper to event outside of the US ? Where does the money go?

    After seing all the threads on the fact that it costs so much money to organize events and therefore it is very hard to make the sport cheaper, I'm wondering how much it costs to enter an event in :
    Canada, GB, Germany, Italy Australia, NZ ...

    I'm going to start with France :
    Training/Prelim level event
    Stabling : $38/night or $64/show
    Entry : $41
    $386 prize money devided between the 8 top riders

    Same show has some classes just for young horses (YEH 4, 5, and 6 and something like green first year and second year) $25.

    So, you can go with a prelim' horse and a prospect, show 2 horses at a 2 day show for a grand total of $194 and if any of your horses are in the top 8, you even can get away for cheaper (making some money) and if you have a very good w-e, you can leave the show with $200 in your pocket.
    Oh yeah, you also get a ribbon, a trophy, a medal and some saddle pads, sheets and other tack gifts

    This show has big dressage arenas, sand footing for the dressage, the stadium and sand footing XC. Rated judges, EMTs, pro XC designer and TD.

    So, how can they make it happened for so cheap and we can't here ?
    Last edited by mademoiselle; Feb. 6, 2009 at 06:05 PM.



  2. #2
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    Nov. 12, 2001
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    Dry Ridge, KY USA
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    Default

    Wow. Those prices are converted from Euros?



  3. #3
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    Jul. 10, 2008
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    Default

    It's not that cheap here,

    West Coast Canada
    Prelim Entry usually approx $250 but can be as low as $200
    Sabling $50-75
    No prize money

    (these are last year's prices and this doesn'tinlcude your yearly membership fees so you can compete)



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov. 26, 2003
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    NE FL
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    Default

    I'm gonna throw this out there, and it is very possible that I am speaking out of turn, but I think that the biggest issue that affects cost is insurance.
    American society is very litigious, and they just do not seem to have that problem in Europe.
    "Perhaps the final test of anybody's love of dogs is their willingness to permit them to make a camping ground of the bed" -Henry T. Merwin



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec. 22, 2006
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    476

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jaegermonster View Post
    I'm gonna throw this out there, and it is very possible that I am speaking out of turn, but I think that the biggest issue that affects cost is insurance.
    American society is very litigious, and they just do not seem to have that problem in Europe.
    Very good point. I rode in Europe for a few years, at various different barns, and never once signed any release form. That would be foolish in the United States!

    Their system of showing is so much more sophisticated than ours. Inexpensive, quality, close-by shows available throughout the week so you never need a hotel and horses get to be in their own boxes at night. What luxury!



  6. #6
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    Default

    In Europe they have universal health care, so if you get hurt, there's no arguing about who will pay. You go to the doctor and they fix you up. No need for lawsuits.

    I suspect also in Europe that they have land for riding clubs, etc, that does not have a recent mortgage. Because our horse facilities tend to be in private hands, when someone retires, that property is sold at its new market value which makes previously doable activity uneconomic.
    If you are allergic to a thing, it is best not to put that thing in your mouth, particularly if the thing is cats. - Lemony Snicket



  7. #7
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    Feb. 22, 2000
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    Default

    agree with Poltroon.

    If American society is litigious, it's more likely a result of the insurance and health care industries, not the other way around. Lawsuits -- filing them, not fighting them -- are often forced on individuals and corporations.

    (Single-payer health coverage would have SAVED California $8 billion/year yet Schwarzenegger vetoed the bill. You can lay the blame at the feet of the insurance/pharmaceutical/health care lobbies. And BTW, California is flat broke and could use the savings.)



  8. #8
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    Jan. 25, 2004
    Location
    Milton, Ontario
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    Default

    I don't know about that. Canada has public health care, very good public health care in fact but we are still consumed by liability concerns.



  9. #9
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    Dec. 7, 2001
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    Default

    Ok, so I understansd the insurance thing, but how much does it cost in insurance to organize an event ?
    and yes Auburn, these prices were converted from Euros and I just took a the first show I found (it would be the equivalent of a show in Aiken).



  10. #10
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    Jan. 19, 2005
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    PA
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    Default

    it is probably cheaper for a lot of reasons. They typically have more competitors. More entries to spread the costs over. There are more events...so more competition for those entries. There are more established courses so the cost have been spread out for longer periods. I don't know about sponsor ship....but perhaps those events have more corporate sponsors or get money from their governing bodies.


    I can think of many reasons...but not having organized and event over there I don't know. I did organize an event here. Not even having to pay for the land/facility....we still just BARELY broke even and that was only because we made enough money on the schooling day following the event to cover our short fall. And this isn't including the cost to build the jumps or setting aside any money for future course building. If you think organizers are making a lot of money doing this in the US.....I can tell you I'm absolutely positive that they are NOT.
    ** The difference between genius and stupidity is genius has its limits. -- Albert Einstein **



  11. #11
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    Default

    I'm not implying that organizers are making any money. I'm just saying that it's weird that you can enter an event for an average of $90 in France (and it includes prizes and money back) and that you can't enter any recognized show here for less than $300 (and often it's even more than that). And you usually only get a a ribbon back (no gifts and no money back).

    So, what makes it so much more expensive here than over there.

    That's also why I was asking what it costs in England, Australia and NZ. Because if it is cheaper everywhere else, we might be able to learn somethine and try to cut costs somewhere.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    May. 15, 2002
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    Default

    Much cheaper in the UK too. And there are so many events every weekend within a short drive or even hack.

    Plus they don't nickle and dime you to death with office fees, trailer in fees, blah blah blah.

    No idea why. Maybe the super-fancy expensive decorated jumps they make? The lack of volunteers and having to pay people? But it certainly stops me competing as much as I'd like to in the US, and doubtless reduces the number of competitors as a whole greatly.
    ............................................
    http://www.xanthoria.com/OTTB
    ............................................



  13. #13
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    May. 16, 2005
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    Elmwood, Wisconsin
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    Default Spectators?

    Do European eventing competitions attract a large number of spectators
    who have no direct ties to the riders? The eventing I know about seldom
    has many spectators who are not directly concerned with the riders and
    the only competition in the USA that charges spectators admission that
    comes to my mind is Rolex. That might make a big difference in cost to
    the riders if they are seen as a sort of "entertainment" for the spectators.
    That seems to be how things work in rodeo in the USA.
    Robin from Dancing Horse Hill
    Elmwood, Wisconsin



  14. #14
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    Jul. 20, 2008
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    Australia
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    Default

    Aussie here!

    My first event for this year will be:
    $10 camping fee
    $100 entry fee for Introductory level (BN in the US I think? )
    $35 per yard/per horse
    + fuel, food, feed, etc etc.
    And the 1st prize is $150, a rug and a medallion.

    So it will probably end up being somewhere close to $200.

    For my Saddle Horse show, it will be $35 entry, + fuel, food, feed etc etc, and will probably come to about $70 - $80



  15. #15
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mandalea View Post
    Aussie here!

    My first event for this year will be:
    $10 camping fee
    $100 entry fee for Introductory level (BN in the US I think? )
    $35 per yard/per horse
    + fuel, food, feed, etc etc.
    And the 1st prize is $150, a rug and a medallion.

    So it will probably end up being somewhere close to $200.

    For my Saddle Horse show, it will be $35 entry, + fuel, food, feed etc etc, and will probably come to about $70 - $80
    Is this australian dollars or US dollars.

    So, if you just look at the show fees it is $135, because you can't include the camping fee in the entry.



  16. #16
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    Feb. 22, 2000
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    Default

    In Australia and NZ, stabling at events is often in outdoor paddocks, which is always cheaper.

    This used to be more common in the US, although I only know of a couple of places that still offer this option. I've had horses who don't like stalls and I try not to keep my horses in trad stalls so I'm always happy to get an outdoor pen.

    In recent years, I've known evneters who won't go to events with outdoor stalls because their trainer says their horses are 'too valuable' for that kind of stabling.

    I would understand this thinking if the horses were 'too soluble' because that would be a problem in the rain but too valuable? If they're so dang valuable, why must they stay in a soft-sided, 10x10 tent stall on hard ground vs. a larger pen with better footing and air circulation?



  17. #17
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    Jul. 20, 2008
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    Australia
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mademoiselle View Post
    Is this australian dollars or US dollars.

    So, if you just look at the show fees it is $135, because you can't include the camping fee in the entry.
    Australian dollars.



  18. #18
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    Default

    which is $90 US. It's funny because, it seems that the cost is the same in France and Australia ...
    And there is some prize money too. The two systems seem similar.



  19. #19
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    May. 15, 2002
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Robin@DHH View Post
    Do European eventing competitions attract a large number of spectators
    who have no direct ties to the riders? The eventing I know about seldom
    has many spectators who are not directly concerned with the riders and
    the only competition in the USA that charges spectators admission that
    comes to my mind is Rolex. That might make a big difference in cost to
    the riders if they are seen as a sort of "entertainment" for the spectators.
    That seems to be how things work in rodeo in the USA.
    Nope - I don't remember spectators at events who weren't rider connections. Maybe at the biggest national horse trials, but not the county level ones for sure.
    ............................................
    http://www.xanthoria.com/OTTB
    ............................................



  20. #20
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    Apr. 30, 2002
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    Smile

    We used to stay in outdoor paddocks at a couple of events many years ago in the west; at Deep Creek near Spokane, we kept horses in uncovered polo pony paddocks at the Spokane Polo club grounds. One night it snowed! And Lily Glen - campfire, sit around, tell stories - sad they are gone. Must be like that in Australia. Anyone want to go with me to Australia and just event there, say the hell with the US? Sigh....
    Hey on the expenses note, does anyone know how much it costs events to insure for accidents/ event insurance? Where do you get it and how much does it cost?
    "Passion, though a bad regulator, is a powerful spring." -- Emerson
    www.eventhorse.wordpress.com



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