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  1. #1
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    Aug. 18, 2007
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    Default Excessive Fat in the Blood

    My horse had his blood pulled yesterday and out of a 5cc syringe, at least 1/2 cc was all fat. Looked like what you would skim off of the top of chicken soup!! Anyone have any experience with this? The blood was sent to Cornell for IR testing... but the excessive fat has me concerned....
    Kim
    The Galloping Grape
    Warrenton, VA
    http://www.GallopingGrape.com



  2. #2
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    Default

    Had you been fasting him for the blood draw?
    "It's like a Russian nesting doll of train wrecks."--CaitlinandTheBay

    ...just settin' on the Group W bench.



  3. #3
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    Default

    No.... vet was on the property for a different horse. My guy has been having problems, possible IR, so I had her pull blood. I've never had to fast for blood draw before?
    Kim
    The Galloping Grape
    Warrenton, VA
    http://www.GallopingGrape.com



  4. #4
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    Default

    May well be linked to the IR.
    "It's like a Russian nesting doll of train wrecks."--CaitlinandTheBay

    ...just settin' on the Group W bench.



  5. #5
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    Dec. 16, 2003
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    Staunton, VA, USA
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    Default Dyslipidemia

    Can be due to a number of possible causes.

    Fasting
    Too much fat in the diet
    malfunctioning pancreas and or liver.

    It's more common i dogs, esp those who eat a lot of human food (high in fat).

    What does your horse eat?
    MW
    Melyni (PhD) PAS, Dipl. ACAN.
    Sign up for the Equine nutrition enewsletter on www.foxdenequine.com
    New edition of book is out:
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    www.knabstruppers4usa.com



  6. #6
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    Default

    He lives on air... he get ridden a minimum of 4 days per week, for at least 1.5 hours on the trails... lots of hills, walk, gait and light canter work. He's always fat... just a big guy. He is a 12 year old Spotted Saddle Horse. He gets to split a 35 lb bale of hay per day with his pasture mate, we have no grass. He gets zero grain... just a handful of McCauly's M30 - which is supplemental. I also have him on Mag Ox, Flax Seed Meal and Brewers Yeast.
    There was alot of fat in that tube. I've never seen anything like it! 1/5th of that syringe was fat...
    Kim
    The Galloping Grape
    Warrenton, VA
    http://www.GallopingGrape.com



  7. #7
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GallopingGrape View Post
    He lives on air... he get ridden a minimum of 4 days per week, for at least 1.5 hours on the trails... lots of hills, walk, gait and light canter work. He's always fat... just a big guy. He is a 12 year old Spotted Saddle Horse. He gets to split a 35 lb bale of hay per day with his pasture mate, we have no grass. He gets zero grain... just a handful of McCauly's M30 - which is supplemental. I also have him on Mag Ox, Flax Seed Meal and Brewers Yeast.
    There was alot of fat in that tube. I've never seen anything like it! 1/5th of that syringe was fat...
    Hmm, what time of day was the blood drawn, how long after his last meal?

    High blood fat can be a problem in dogs, but I have not heard of it in horses. But there's always a first.
    MW
    Melyni (PhD) PAS, Dipl. ACAN.
    Sign up for the Equine nutrition enewsletter on www.foxdenequine.com
    New edition of book is out:
    Horse Nutrition Handbook.

    www.knabstruppers4usa.com



  8. #8
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    Default

    His "breakfast" was literally a handful of the M30.... that was at 8:00 am and his blood was pulled at 10:30am. He probably had a flake or so of hay as well.
    Kim
    The Galloping Grape
    Warrenton, VA
    http://www.GallopingGrape.com



  9. #9
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Melyni View Post
    Hmm, what time of day was the blood drawn, how long after his last meal?

    High blood fat can be a problem in dogs, but I have not heard of it in horses. But there's always a first.
    MW
    You've not heard of hyperlipidemia?
    "It's like a Russian nesting doll of train wrecks."--CaitlinandTheBay

    ...just settin' on the Group W bench.



  10. #10
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    Default

    No, but I just googled it... copied it and sent it to my vet!
    Kim
    The Galloping Grape
    Warrenton, VA
    http://www.GallopingGrape.com



  11. #11
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GallopingGrape View Post
    His "breakfast" was literally a handful of the M30.... that was at 8:00 am and his blood was pulled at 10:30am. He probably had a flake or so of hay as well.
    As I'm pretty sure the "fasting" blood draw to check for IR should be normal forage intake, it sounds like you were right there, and the fat is not a good thing. Also, your description of him - air fern, breed - puts him in the IR high risk category.

    Good thing you're testing What exactly are they going to test for? Hopefully insulin and glucose.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by GallopingGrape View Post
    No, but I just googled it... copied it and sent it to my vet!
    i'd be very surprised if your vet hasn't at lest heard of it.
    "It's like a Russian nesting doll of train wrecks."--CaitlinandTheBay

    ...just settin' on the Group W bench.



  13. #13
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    Default

    I believe she is testing for gluclose and insuline... When I saw all of that fat, I didn't htink it was normal.... it looked awful. I've never seen anything like it! My poor guy has Lymes too, he just looks tired, tired, tired.
    Kim
    The Galloping Grape
    Warrenton, VA
    http://www.GallopingGrape.com



  14. #14
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    Your horse could be in very serious trouble.

    Obese horses also are at greater risk of a life threatening metabolic disorder called hyperlipidemia (abnormally high blood lipid concentrations) if deprived of feed. When any horse is deprived of feed for more than 24 hours it mobilizes its body fat to meet its energy requirements. This is normal and is not a problem in normal or underweight horses. But in obese horses and ponies the fat deposits are large and rapidly mobilized. In severe deprivation, the horse or pony can develop hyperlipidemia. This puts an abnormal stress on the liver where the lipids are metabolized and may cause irreparable liver damage.
    http://www.esc.rutgers.edu/publicati...iles/fs799.pdf

    From Robert Eustace, BVSc Cert EO Cert FP FRCVS, director of The Laminits Clinic in Dauntsey, England:
    “Starvation or too drastic a reduction in feed can lead to hyperlipidemia, Eustace says.
    “If the energy level of the diet is suddenly reduced, the animal will mobilize fat reserves to provide the missing energy,” he says. “In cases of hyperlipidemia, the mobilization gets out of control with excessive quantities of liquid fat being released into the bloodstream. Hyperlipidemia is often fatal.”
    http://www.veterinarypracticenews.co...on-a-diet.aspx



  15. #15
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    Default

    He definitely isn't deprived of feed, he gets free choice hay all day... 1/2 bale in the a.m. and 1/2 bale in the evening.... the hyperlipidemia terrifies me. My question is, what is "abnormal" levels of fat?? Has anyone seen big clumps of white fat floating around in a blood sample? Almost 1cc out of 5cc's was fat. Is this abnormal?
    Kim
    The Galloping Grape
    Warrenton, VA
    http://www.GallopingGrape.com



  16. #16
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GallopingGrape View Post
    My question is, what is "abnormal" levels of fat?? Has anyone seen big clumps of white fat floating around in a blood sample? Almost 1cc out of 5cc's was fat. Is this abnormal?
    Absolutely! Please be sure your vet tests that blood for liver function and triglycerides. I'll bet they're well over 500mg/dL.

    Measurement of serum triglyceride concentration appears to be the best method of diagnosing hyperlipemia. The standard criterion for diagnosis is serum triglyceride concentration in excess of 500 mg/dL.
    http://wwwchem.csustan.edu/chem4400/SJBR/99boyce.htm



  17. #17
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    Default

    Diabetics tend to have high triglyceride levels - could be a sign that your horse has well advanced IR. This is how the body tries to deal with the excess sugar in the blood. The liver pulls it out of the blood and converts it into triglycerides that are then deposited on those typical areas - the neck, behind the shoulders and above the croup.



  18. #18
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GallopingGrape View Post
    He definitely isn't deprived of feed, he gets free choice hay all day... 1/2 bale in the a.m. and 1/2 bale in the evening.... the hyperlipidemia terrifies me. My question is, what is "abnormal" levels of fat?? Has anyone seen big clumps of white fat floating around in a blood sample? Almost 1cc out of 5cc's was fat. Is this abnormal?
    Wow, wish my horse ate like that. I feed a bale am and pm and there is still a couple of hours each end of the day where there is not even evidence of hay having been fed at all. And that is between one Canadian mare and a mini donkey.
    Sure hope the fat in your horses blood gets figured out and he is okay.



  19. #19
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    May. 25, 2003
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    Talking nurse chimes in here! Not fat!

    Stay calm!! Ignore everything everyone has written here....that wasn't fat! It's SERUM! A normal component of blood. I repeat = NOT FAT!

    Whole blood is made up of several components like red blood cells, white blood cells, platelets etc. Think of them as solids suspended in a clear, yellow tinted liquied called serum. Blood naturally settles out after it's drawn & some of the components coagulate or stick together separating from the carrying liquid. Serum is the liquid. It always looks like it's floated to the top but actually the solid stuff (cells) has actually just settled leaving the serum visible. If you went to a blood lab you see multiple vials all separated out all over the place. I could go on.....

    Got it? But I can see how you'd think this though!



  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by wateryglen View Post
    Stay calm!! Ignore everything everyone has written here....that wasn't fat! It's SERUM! A normal component of blood. I repeat = NOT FAT!

    Whole blood is made up of several components like red blood cells, white blood cells, platelets etc. Think of them as solids suspended in a clear, yellow tinted liquied called serum. Blood naturally settles out after it's drawn & some of the components coagulate or stick together separating from the carrying liquid. Serum is the liquid. It always looks like it's floated to the top but actually the solid stuff (cells) has actually just settled leaving the serum visible. If you went to a blood lab you see multiple vials all separated out all over the place. I could go on.....

    Got it? But I can see how you'd think this though!
    I'm sure if it is merely serum that the OP has already been reassured by her DVM.
    But IME, it doesn't float around in clumps, so it may not be...
    "It's like a Russian nesting doll of train wrecks."--CaitlinandTheBay

    ...just settin' on the Group W bench.



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