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  1. #1
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    Aug. 1, 2003
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    Georgia.
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    Default Sprung shoe removal - what tools?

    What is the best tool to use to pull the nails? My SO has & can remove shoes and we have a shoe puller but what is the best tool in the garage for the nails?

    I need to pull the shoe as the horse can't be stalled until my farrier can get here (hopefully tomorrow).

    T.I.A.



  2. #2
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    Jan. 4, 2007
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    Default

    If you mean the nails are still clinched and you want to losen them, you can use a small chisel and tap them up gently.
    In a pinch, you can use the rasp and file the clinches off.
    Then the nails should come off fine when you pull on the shoe.



  3. #3
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bluey View Post
    If you mean the nails are still clinched and you want to losen them, you can use a small chisel and tap them up gently.
    In a pinch, you can use the rasp and file the clinches off.
    Then the nails should come off fine when you pull on the shoe.
    Yea, I need to loosen the nails. Sorry I wasn't clear.



  4. #4
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    Default

    I meant you can tap the clinches from the bottom up to straighten them and let the whole nail then come off with the shoe.
    Most nails that have been on a while are way too hard to pull up one at the time, because the heads are worn down into the shoe.
    If you try to pull on them and break them off, without the heads, you would then really have a hard time getting what may be left of the nail out of the hoof.

    That is why generally you pull the shoe and that pulls the nails out.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul. 8, 2007
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    Default

    Unless your horse has brittle hoofwall the nails get pulled out with the shoe without any unclinching step. If they are very thin and brittle do what that poster above me said first. Then take the pullers and grasp between the hoof and the shoe far back towards the heel making sure you get at least part of the puller between the shoe and the hoof. Rock the pullers towards the toe which uses lever force and the width of the pullers to pull the shoe away from the hoof slightly at the heel. Repeat on the other side. Now if you've gotten any space made tap the shoe back down on the hoof and nails closest to the heel will be sticking up slightly. If they aren't high enough to grasp repeat the steps above but this time with the pullers still on the side arms of the shoe, but move closer to the toe (still behind the last nail). Tap the shoe back down. The nails should be higher now. Grasp the head of the nail with the pullers and again using the lever action rock the handle of the pullers towards the toe to loosen it more and then pull out. Repeat loosening the next set of nails until you have the whole shoe off. Most cinches are small and will unfold themselves as you pull them out. If they are large or the horse has brittle feet do what bluey said first to remove or unfold them.



  6. #6
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    Jul. 16, 2005
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    Maryland
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by amastrike View Post
    Use a rasp to file the clinches down. You should be able to run your fingers over the nails and not feel any bump. When the clinches are gone, it's a pretty simple matter to get the shoe off. I wouldn't pull a shoe without taking off the clinches first. Not worth the risk of taking off a bunch of hoof wall.

    When your farrier comes, ask what he recommends you do. Or just watch how he takes shoes off.

    I agree That's what I do...rasp the clinches till they are gone and pull the shoe.
    <)__~~
    <\ <\,,
    The delicate and exquisite horse is itself a work of art.



  7. #7
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    Feb. 18, 2006
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    east central Illinois and working north to the 'burbs
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gypsymare View Post
    Unless your horse has brittle hoofwall the nails get pulled out with the shoe without any unclinching step.
    Not necessarily a good idea. There is too much chance of pulling out a chunk of the wall this way. Its always better to cut the clinches one way or another.

    Also, if your horse is in the least thin soled or sensitive, then using shoe pullers is contra-indicated as you can easily bruise the sole. Its a better protocol to use crease nail pullers.



  8. #8
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    Default Got the shoe off...

    but I will ask my farrier to teach me how and advise what tools I need to have here.

    Thanks everyone!!!



  9. #9
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    Aug. 30, 2001
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    Purcellville, VA
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    Default

    I bought a clinch cutter tool and a nail puller and my farrier spent some time making sure I had a good enough technique to pull shoes.

    I just use a regular hammer though.

    I don't have good enough technique w/ a rasp to rasp down the clinches. With the clinch cutter and nail pulls, it is quick and easy, even for me.



  10. #10
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    Jul. 2, 2003
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    Woodland, Ca
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    Simple... flat head screw driver and a hammer. Hold screwdriver against the clinch at about a 30 degree angle. Tap with a hammer. If you have a pair of pilers use the back of the hammer to pull the shoe away from the foot a little bit. push shoe back so that the head of the nail sticks up. Grab head of nail with the pliers and pull nail out.



  11. #11
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    Jul. 29, 2006
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    Colorado- Yee Haw!
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    Default

    My farrier showed me how to do it with the chisel method referenced above. I second asking your farrier - it was very interesting when he showed me.

    Another related question- how far sprung does a shoe need to be for you to pull? If the shoe is on good and tight and the farrier is coming out the next day is it the best course of action to pull it, or just leave it if it's say <1/2" sprung on one side? Just curious what people think on this - I usually just leave it and don't turn out.



  12. #12
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    Apr. 9, 2002
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    Northern NJ
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bluey View Post
    I meant you can tap the clinches from the bottom up to straighten them and let the whole nail then come off with the shoe.
    Most nails that have been on a while are way too hard to pull up one at the time, because the heads are worn down into the shoe.
    If you try to pull on them and break them off, without the heads, you would then really have a hard time getting what may be left of the nail out of the hoof.

    That is why generally you pull the shoe and that pulls the nails out.
    Would it be OK to use crease nail pullers? Rasp the clinches off, pull nails individually, and go from there?



  13. #13
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    Jan. 4, 2007
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lauren! View Post
    Would it be OK to use crease nail pullers? Rasp the clinches off, pull nails individually, and go from there?
    If you can, sure.
    As someone said, once you get the shoe a little up, if you tap it back down some nail heads stay up and you can pull those individually.
    Although by then the shoe should come off easily, pulling all nails with it right off.

    Pulling a shoe is about knowing where to grab it and how to use leverage and the right little pull to get it loose.
    Long handled nippers give you much leverage.

    I spent nine months leaning to trim, make shoes and put them on with a master farrier. We used hot shoeing.
    Later did all the 30+ horses in my riding school and even later, for a year, took care of our 75+ horses here, but most of those were trims.
    That was long ago and I never was a professional.

    I think that anyone should know how to trim a piece of hoof that breaks half off, before it may break up any higher on the hoof and know how to pull a shoe, for emergencies.
    Ask your farriers to show you how and maybe sell you an old nipper they don't use any more, or tell you where to get one.



  14. #14
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    Jul. 8, 2007
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    Default

    You can use crease nail pullers (that's what they're made for!) but that's really doing it the harder way. You have much better leverage with the long-handled shoe pullers. Once you tap the shoe down and the nails pop up it's much easier to grasp them with the shoe pullers. I only use the crease pullers when the nails won't pop up which sometimes happens when the shoe has a lot of wear and the nails have expanded in their holes because of the repeated concussion. By then they're usually so worn down you can't get a good grasp on them with crease nail pullers anyhow so you have to pull them out with the shoe itself.



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