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  1. #1
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    Default Cheaper alternative to Animalintex?

    My farrier just recommended that I use Animalintex on my horse with bad feet. Since this horse abscesses A LOT in wet weather, I was wondering if there is a cheaper alternative that would have the same results? Thanks!



  2. #2
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    What's the rationale for using a poultice? And what do you mean by 'bad feet'?

    Is he suggesting it for solar bruising - to draw out an abscess ...?

    What may be a viable alternative depends on what you want to use it for.



  3. #3
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    Well right now he doesn't want to put weight on his left hind heel. My farrier couldn't find an abscess, so he is suspecting a bruise. But this horse gets abscesses quite often, and my farrier also advised me that I should only wrap with ichthammol the first couple of days and then follow up with animalintex. So I could see the animalintex bill getting expensive if I use it for each abscess.

    By bad feet, I mean this horse has thin, soft soles. He is trimmed regularly, and I treat his feet daily, but even today my farrier found two gravels, some seedy toe, a bruising on a couple different feet.



  4. #4
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    Are the soles thin, flat (lacking concavity) or both?
    Altamont Sport Horses
    Trakehners * Knabstruppers * Appaloosa Sport Horses
    Home of stallions: Ambrosius af Asgard "Atlantis" & Hollywood Hot Spot
    Birmingham, AL



  5. #5
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    Animalintex pads are cheap How many do you plan on using.

    Can you (dare you) share photos of your horses feet?

    Chronic Abscesses are indicative of other issues.

    Regards,



  6. #6
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    Diapers are GREAT for feet, you can literally set the hoof down on them and diaper it up nicely and neatly. Then I usually go over the whole thing with vet wrap, some duct tape for the toe and/or sole, and slip one of these over the whole thing:
    http://www.smartpakequine.com/produc...ctClassid=6183

    For poultice I use this:
    http://www.smartpakequine.com/Produc...eCategory=true

    Truthfully, if he has thin, soft soles, I wouldn't be wrapping or poulticing too much unless there is an acute problem. It will just soften the sole even more.

    I'd also suspect that if he is abscessing chronically, balance is off somewhere... that has been the case in 2 of mine that were chronic abscessers. Once you fix the root issue the abscessing decreases.

    Durasole is a good product for toughening feet. You could look into hoof boots, or equi-casting, as an alternative to shoes. I'd also take a look at this diet and cut down on sugar.... I've noticed in my TB, when I made a diet change, a very small increase in sugar accompanied a recurrence of thrush and general foot gookiness.
    We couldn't all be cowboys, so some of us are clowns.



  7. #7
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    Thanks for the tips, everyone! If there are other issues going on, I am having a hard time getting someone to diagnose them. I don't think the issues are diet related, because he was sound all summer and fall when the ground was dry and rock hard. But we just get so much moisture during the winter that everything turns to mud and this guy's feet fall apart.

    In the past year, I have had probably 5 different farriers and a vet that specialized in podiatry look at him. I've used shoes, equi cast, durasole, equi-pack, keratex, venice turpentine and numerous other products. Nothing seems to matter in the end; when the mud roles in, his feet get bad. For instance, I have been using the durasole religiously for several months. He soles looked great...that stuff REALLY works! But when we got a ton of rain, my horse just shed his soles right off and what is left is pretty much what I started with before the durasole. And hence came the abscesses and bruising right back...

    I actually just started using a new farrier and I have hopes that he can turn this guy around. He actually wants to do things a whole lot differently though. First of all, he wants me to cut back on the durasole and start packing his hooves once a week. He told me there is a saying "you can't break a marshmellow" and that makes sense to me. His theory is that I can make his soles hard as a rock, but that is just going to drive the bruising that he gets higher up into the foot. Second, he wants me to use the animalintex when he does get an abscess or bruise. Third, I am going to schedule appointments with him about once a month so hopefully we can start nipping these problems in the bud.

    I'll try to get some pictures tomorrow.



  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by caryledee View Post

    In the past year, I have had probably 5 different farriers and a vet that specialized in podiatry look at him. I've used shoes, equi cast, durasole, equi-pack, keratex, venice turpentine and numerous other products. Nothing seems to matter in the end; when the mud roles in, his feet get bad. For instance, I have been using the durasole religiously for several months. He soles looked great...that stuff REALLY works! But when we got a ton of rain, my horse just shed his soles right off and what is left is pretty much what I started with before the durasole. And hence came the abscesses and bruising right back...
    Oh that is a bummer! And I can definitely relate. My guy's soles were looking lovely and now have decided to shed completely..... He too has bad feet, and any bit of moisture/mud/nastiness makes things so much worse.

    Good luck, hopefully your new team of pros is able to get him straightened around!
    We couldn't all be cowboys, so some of us are clowns.



  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by FlashGordon View Post
    Oh that is a bummer! And I can definitely relate. My guy's soles were looking lovely and now have decided to shed completely..... He too has bad feet, and any bit of moisture/mud/nastiness makes things so much worse.

    Good luck, hopefully your new team of pros is able to get him straightened around!
    Thanks, I hope so too! And thanks for the links to the Smart Pak stuff...I did use that epsom salt poultice once last year and it really seemed to help! I had totally forgotten about it though. And those wraps look awesome...so much easier than duct tape!

    Good luck with your guy too...maybe we just need to send them both to the desert!!



  10. #10
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    What a bummer! You might ask your farrier why he specifically recommends Animalintex. It's a great product for drawing abscess, but I'd be curious to know whether he recommends it wet or dry, whether he likes it for its drawing properties or antiseptic properties, etc. etc. Depending on his answer, there might be an alternative dressing.

    But if it's gotta be Animalintex, your cheapest source will probably be Jeffers Equine. $5.79 per 8" x 16" roll, and they ship free over $49.
    http://www.JeffersPet.com/product/an...ltice-8753.cfm
    ________________________
    Resident COTH saddle nerd. (CYA: Not a pro, just a long-time enthusiast!)
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by jn4jenny View Post
    What a bummer! You might ask your farrier why he specifically recommends Animalintex. It's a great product for drawing abscess, but I'd be curious to know whether he recommends it wet or dry, whether he likes it for its drawing properties or antiseptic properties, etc. etc. Depending on his answer, there might be an alternative dressing.

    But if it's gotta be Animalintex, your cheapest source will probably be Jeffers Equine. $5.79 per 8" x 16" roll, and they ship free over $49.
    http://www.JeffersPet.com/product/an...ltice-8753.cfm
    Thanks for the tip!! That is a lot cheaper than most other places I have looked! I think he recommended animalintex because I have been using Ichthammol quite a bit and his heels are getting greasy. Animalintex will do the same job without all the goop.



  12. #12
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    I just bought 4 animalintex pads on ebay for 20.00....might want to look there. Seller was fast too...had them within the week.



  13. #13
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    NOTHING works like Animalintex if that is what you need. And it's not THAT expensive. My advice is to suck it up and use it if you need it.

    But.. Flash - this doesn't apply to your new horse, he's too "new" yet - your horses feet shouldn't fall to crap just because the weather changed. 7 horses here this year, all had good feet going into winter, still all have good feet, two of them are improving even more. So.. please don't blame it on the weather. Keep looking for the real reason. Blaming foot failure on wet/mud is BS IMO.. something was already up if they need to stay dry to stay ok.
    "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
    ---
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.



  14. #14
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    Don't forget you can cut out a small piece of animalintex, rather than using the whole pad.

    back in ye olde days when the vet would come out and dig out an abscess, we used to just dress the remaining hole with an apppropriately sized square--usually only about 2-3" square--for about 3 days until the drainage had stopped, then shoe with a leather pad to protect the hole. We never had gigantic gaping holes, seemed to work, and the horse was generally sound and back in work in a week.

    I still have trouble with this concept of leaving them to work their own way out--I understand about not insulting the structure of the foot more than necessary, but leaving a horse gimping around in pain is just foreign to me.



  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by atr View Post
    Don't forget you can cut out a small piece of animalintex, rather than using the whole pad.

    back in ye olde days when the vet would come out and dig out an abscess, we used to just dress the remaining hole with an apppropriately sized square--usually only about 2-3" square--for about 3 days until the drainage had stopped, then shoe with a leather pad to protect the hole. We never had gigantic gaping holes, seemed to work, and the horse was generally sound and back in work in a week.

    I still have trouble with this concept of leaving them to work their own way out--I understand about not insulting the structure of the foot more than necessary, but leaving a horse gimping around in pain is just foreign to me.
    Even if you are animalintexing the whole bottom of the foot you will still be able to get >1 out of each one and even more if you are willing to piece using the remnants from cutting out the hoof-shaped pieces.
    The Evil Chem Prof



  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by EqTrainer View Post
    NOTHING works like Animalintex if that is what you need. And it's not THAT expensive. My advice is to suck it up and use it if you need it.

    But.. Flash - this doesn't apply to your new horse, he's too "new" yet - your horses feet shouldn't fall to crap just because the weather changed. 7 horses here this year, all had good feet going into winter, still all have good feet, two of them are improving even more. So.. please don't blame it on the weather. Keep looking for the real reason. Blaming foot failure on wet/mud is BS IMO.. something was already up if they need to stay dry to stay ok.
    You're right; at Jeffer's price and cutting it in pieces, its actually pretty cheap. Tack stores around here sell it for about double that.

    I agree with what you said about Flash's horse...but it sounds like she has the same problem I do. Do you have any other suggestions about how I could get to the bottom of the problem? I've been trying to find an answer for a year now and although he is better than last year, I'd like to get to the point where he is comfortable year round.



  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by caryledee View Post
    Thanks for the tips, everyone! If there are other issues going on, I am having a hard time getting someone to diagnose them. I don't think the issues are diet related, because he was sound all summer and fall when the ground was dry and rock hard. But we just get so much moisture during the winter that everything turns to mud and this guy's feet fall apart. have had probably 5 different farriers and a vet that specialized in podiatry look at him.
    What is the breed of your horse and what are you feeding him? Perhaps what is sufficient in the summer isn't sufficient in the winter due to what is lost in the diet when there is no grass.

    No surprise that nobody has possibly diagnosed that diet could be a cause. Vets and farriers are unfortunately not necessarily great with nutrition.
    Altamont Sport Horses
    Trakehners * Knabstruppers * Appaloosa Sport Horses
    Home of stallions: Ambrosius af Asgard "Atlantis" & Hollywood Hot Spot
    Birmingham, AL



  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by atr View Post
    Don't forget you can cut out a small piece of animalintex, rather than using the whole pad.

    You're right; I didn't realize the pads were that big! That does cut down on costs alot.

    I still have trouble with this concept of leaving them to work their own way out--I understand about not insulting the structure of the foot more than necessary, but leaving a horse gimping around in pain is just foreign to me.
    I agree with you...I do call the farrier when he starts gimping and I suspect an abscess, but I need to have a treatment plan in place until he can get there.



  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Altamont Sport Horses View Post
    What is the breed of your horse and what are you feeding him? Perhaps what is sufficient in the summer isn't sufficient in the winter due to what is lost in the diet when there is no grass.

    No surprise that nobody has possibly diagnosed that diet could be a cause. Vets and farriers are unfortunately not necessarily great with nutrition.
    He is a TB and there hasn't been much grass in his field this year due to lack of rain, so his diet hasn't really changed from summer to now. I actually just switched his feed to McCauleys Top 10...10% protein and 10% fat. He also gets alfalfa mix hay and Horseshoers Secret supplement.



  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by caryledee View Post
    Do you have any other suggestions about how I could get to the bottom of the problem? I've been trying to find an answer for a year now and although he is better than last year, I'd like to get to the point where he is comfortable year round.
    I'm not JB but I'll share an experience I've had the past two years with 3 different OTTB's.

    Horses all in different barns in New York - Westchester and Orange County. Horses out 24/7. Minimal Grain, 24/7 access to hay in winter and then grass paddocks in summer.

    During winter feet were decent, not stellar but looked pretty good, despite muddy conditions. Spring comes along, horses are put out on pasture. I believe the horses all have mild IR issues, but be that as it may they are on grass spring summer and fall.

    After a month in Spring last year first OTTB's feet, fell apart, I mean they were soft, splitting like onions. Owner had nutritionist come in, tested various ways. Horse was deficient in Selenium and Copper/Zinc. Switched feeds, made slight difference. Then nutritionist recommended Equi-sure by KER(I think that is who makes it). Horse was on it for 30 days and immediately started seeing a difference in the feet. By the beginning of summer, horse started looking like she did in the winter (feet wise). Owner finished Equi-sure, took horse off, by Mid summer horses feet had fallen apart again. Put horse back on ES and by the end of summer feet were looking good again. This year, owner put horse on ES starting the beginning of Mar and stopped at the end of Oct, feet look great.

    I passed this info on to two other OTTB owners and they are experiencing the same results.

    So is it fact, I doubt it, but something INEXPENSIVE to try.

    Regards,



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