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  1. #41
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    Dec. 30, 2006
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    Oh! for a gaited horse forum on COTH... such fun to read!
    from sunridge1:Go get 'em Roy! Stupid clown shoe nailing, acid pouring bast@rds.it is going to be good until the last drop!Eleneswell, the open trail begged to be used. D Taylor



  2. #42
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    Mar. 8, 2006
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    Southeast Pennsylvania
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    Quote Originally Posted by buryinghill4 View Post
    How in God's name do you teach a horse to do this...

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6tJARMFTVqk&NR=1


    Gives new meaning to the phrase "going nowhere fast"..........


    2 members found this post helpful.

  3. #43
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    Sep. 8, 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dispatcher View Post
    Gives new meaning to the phrase "going nowhere fast"..........
    That's because you are viewing a video of a show horse, doing show gaits and a specialized form of the gait at that. Rather like saying that a dressage horse isn't going anywhere fast when they are being exhibited at piaffe. I have a Paso mare that can keep up with a cantering thoroughbred and never miss a beat of her gait. We have friends who ride endurance on theirs and have no issues keeping up with Arabians (in one case, 2 national champion endurance Arabs, with whom she rides regularly). The purpose of the gait is smooth, powerful speed. Riding a Paso at 'largo' (the extended 4 beat gait) is rather like those dreams you have of flying. Or perhaps like being on roller-skates. Very smooth, no bouncing. Not all the Pasos have that 'fretful' feel either. Really depends on the individual, just like every other breed.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #44
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    Aug. 5, 2009
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    A while back I went and spectated at a Paso show (may have had other Spanish gaited horses also, I don't remember). Anyway, they had a group of horses that showed only at a canter on the sounding boards. To confess, I found it rather grotesque, but then I didn't know what was going on.

    Okay, Paso peeps. Please explain this further.

    BTW, the food they served at that show was wonderful.



  5. #45
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    Sep. 8, 2011
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    If they were cantering on the sounding board you were watching trote-galope horses. Similar heritage to the Paso Fino, but they don't exhibit the 4 beat gait. Were the riders wearing what looked like black batwing chaps?



  6. #46
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    Feb. 9, 2011
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    IE SoCal
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    Trote y Galope horses! I generally don't like paso finos, but I'd make an exception for one of these guys!

    They canter over the board at about 2:43
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CKPoXIwGhgI


    1 members found this post helpful.

  7. #47
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    Jan. 2, 2006
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    Dallas, NC
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    I have a paso fino/ saddlebred cross (I didn't do it, bought him that way) he looks like a saddlebred in size and looks but gaits like the ones in the video with the Peruvian Paso, that paddling (his toes on the front are squared off). He's an AWESOME ride. He's completely blind but still a wonderful ride!

    Our newest boarder is a 82 year old lady with a Paso Fino that was a grand champion several times. I tell you I was about to ask her to leave, he was a nervous wreck! Almost out of control. We put him in quarantine with another new horse and he bonded so hard to her (and her to him) that they couldn't be separated so we decided to put them in two different pastures.

    He paced and paced and PACED that fence line, stayed soaked in sweat. But he was cool to watch, he did that fast quick pace (that doesn't go very far very fast) the whole day. By that night though he finally calmed down and was eating at the haybale with his new pasture mates. The next day he was fine. Sweet as pie and cute as a button! So TINY! I just love him!
    I want a signature but I have nothing original to say except: "STHU and RIDE!!!

    Wonderful COTHER's I've met: belleellis, stefffic, snkstacres and janedoe726.



  8. #48
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    Oct. 26, 2007
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    San Jose, Ca
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    To me they look like their legs are playing on Fast Foward while their body is traveling in Slow Motion.



  9. #49
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    Nov. 15, 2004
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    Nescopeck PA
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    Out of college I got a summer job "exercising" paso finos. It quickly turned into a training job about 2 weeks in. My first horse to help the owner train was a three year old stallion. I worked there all four summers and the fall after I graduated purchased the stallion from him. He was a performance/pleasure stallion so we showed quite a bit. It was different fom my hunter/dressage horses! I still have Movado. Gelded him two and one half years ago and every time I ride him I think "why don't I ride him more?" He's an awesome timed events "pony".
    Maria Hayes-Frosty Oak Stables
    Home to All Eyez On Me, 1998 16.2 Cleveland Bay Sporthorse Stallion
    & FrostyOak Hampton 2008 Pure Cleveland Bay Colt
    www.frostyoaks.com



  10. #50
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    Oct. 16, 2001
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    PA
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    Years ago, I worked for a private farm situated smack in the middle of some beautiful foxhunting country. It was not uncommon to hack out from the farm and see many of the (quite traditionalist) neighbors riding as well, mounted on their finely tuned hunt horses. Most had a good dose of TB blood, and wore only the most conservative english tack. Anything straying from norm stuck out, and could quickly become fodder for gossip among the older hidebound neighbors.

    One day, I arrived at the barn to find out my boss had purchased a Paso Fino for his wife to ride. I had heard of the breed, but never seen one. I'd never even ridden any sort of gaited horse. However, I was instructed to take him out for a ride to see how he did on the trails. He was a nice fellow, and the walk seemed normal enough. I was in for quite a shock when we started to move faster! His legs seemed to be going a million miles an hour, while we merely inched slowly forward. I could. not. stop. giggling.

    Apparently, his way of going did not go unnoticed by the old biddies in the neighborhood. One of them got so upset, she actually called me to complain. She had seen that new chestnut, and could not *believe* that we were riding something that was so obviously "foot-sore." For the record, the horse was perfectly sound...but apparently I was not the only one in the area who had never seen a paso "go" before.

    They got over it eventually, and the horse became the most valued "guest horse" in the barn. He was kind and easy to stay on, even if the riders had no idea about "posting" I couldn't tell you how many gaits he had or what they were called, but they sure were fun!
    *Absolut Equestrian*

    "The plural of anecdote is not fact...except in the horse industry"



  11. #51
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    Oct. 18, 2008
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    Deschapelles, Haiti
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    Brio and other PF owners - where are you getting well fitting saddles from? I'm about ready to give up on my Wintec AP and get something different since I'm still having trouble with dry spots and fit issues on Hoover. Do you find some types of dressage saddles work, or do you find it's worth it to go to a Paso saddle like Sycamore Creek makes? I'm far more used to fitting english than western saddles, but the western design might be more versatile for field work.
    HAS provides hospital care to 340,000 people in Haiti's Artibonite Valley 24/7/365/earthquake/cholera/whatever.
    www.hashaiti.org blog:http://hashaiti.org/blog



  12. #52
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    Apr. 17, 2002
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    between the barn and the pond
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    This is the saddler most recommended by Larry Whitesell, who has quite a lot of Paso experience.


    I have nothing but gaited horses on my place and don't think COTH needs a gaited forum- look how quiet the Western forum has gotten after the initial rush. http://gaitedhorsesense.com is a very nice, inclusive, and informed forum for gaited discussions.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  13. #53
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    Sep. 8, 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by HorsesinHaiti View Post
    Brio and other PF owners - where are you getting well fitting saddles from? I'm about ready to give up on my Wintec AP and get something different since I'm still having trouble with dry spots and fit issues on Hoover. Do you find some types of dressage saddles work, or do you find it's worth it to go to a Paso saddle like Sycamore Creek makes? I'm far more used to fitting english than western saddles, but the western design might be more versatile for field work.
    I both show and trail my Pasos. Husband trains them professionally. For show and training we use Kuda saddles exclusively. He makes them in both flex and regular tree. I've found the Casa Dosa saddles and the Yanceys (modified McClellan) work well on the young horses, but as soon as they put some muscle (or fat LOL) on, they begin to pinch.

    For trail I have a Kuda Enduro and also a Collegiate marathon, both of which work well. The dressage saddles CAN work, but you have to find one that is the right size for the horse. Seems like most of them were made for something much larger. You may want to look at this one from Kuda: https://www.kudastore.com/index.php/...er-detail.html We use these for show, but they are incredibly comfortable and secure. My kids trail ride in their show saddles, which are pint-sized versions of this one.

    If you want to go high-end I have a friend that rides her Paso in endurance and she has a Specialized saddle that she swears by, but that is definitely high dollar$.



  14. #54
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    Jul. 5, 2007
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    Beside Myself ~ Western NY
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    Once, at the NY State Breeders show, my mother and I were admiring a dark dark dapple grey Paso who was standing tied outside of his stall. The Hispanic trainer wanted us to ride him immediately. His owner, did not want her horse giving pony rides before her class (understandable) so the trainer got out a 3 yr old grey stallion (not as gorgeous, but very lovely) and saddled him up for us.

    He turned us completely loose on that colt and encouraged us to ride him anywhere we wanted. The gaits were amazing, the colt's manners impeccable. I would not hesitate to ride or buy a Paso if another one ever crossed my path. I often note them when they show up on the broker pages. There was a pretty mare just this week.



  15. #55
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    Dec. 14, 2006
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    VA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barnfairy View Post
    Oh, he was plenty smooth alright, but the stress was palpable -- he felt like he was going to fret himself into heart failure. Zero relaxation. I hope that is not typical or correct for the breed.
    Agreed.

    I managed of 4 or 5 from show stables sold to a rich novice who wanted pretty and flashy. You get that in spades. You don't get mental or physical soundness. Chunky bodies on skinny legs. The one that was 100% sound was a danger to himself. The curb chained popped off once (not with me on!): horse and rider ended up sliding sideways on gravel into a stone wall when they failed to make the turn home into the driveway. He starts gaiting when tied. More than one starts once saddled. Some even do it on the trailer. I agree with Barnfairy that it seems like anxiety.

    You can make them go up with very little effort.

    Do not look up youtube videos of training them in stocks.

    Their figure 8 contains every sin in the DQ Bible. Sometimes it's fun to ride with the devil! Bonus you get plenty of room on the trails when they hear that thunder and see that blowing, foaming, wall-eyed, cresty beast.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  16. #56
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    Sep. 8, 2011
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    413

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bicoastal View Post
    Agreed.
    You don't get mental or physical soundness. Chunky bodies on skinny legs.
    Sorry you had such a bad experience with the ones you managed, but behavior issues like that are largely training-related. I've seen pasos like those and what you describe is absolutely anxiety created by trainers trying to push the horses to become 'fino' (there is a premium price placed on horses that can execute that gait). We had a filly brought to us for training from another barn that would fall apart whenever someone walked behind her with a shovel/rake/broom etc. Took us a little while to figure out that someone had been working her under saddle with another person 'chasing' her with an implement to get her more 'up' and gaiting more rapidly so they could charge more for her. If someone was chasing my lardy middle-aged butt with a Taser you bet I could run faster, but I'd likely be an injured, nervous wreck after a week too. Maybe sooner.

    I do have to call you out on the the soundness comment because my BS meter pegged when I read that. We do rigorous, mountainous rides on our show horses, and by 'we' I mean my 13 and 11 year old daughters. If Pasos were so mentally and physically fragile we'd never made it home! FWIW the horse my youngest rides is a 2x national champion in the youth division. The one my middle daughter rides was a multi-time national champ in the adult classes. Both are still being shown in addition to being trailridden. Both horses LOVE the trails and neither have ever had a lameness issue. Nor are they "blowing, foaming, wall-eyed beasts". I'll give you the cresty part though, as the gelding likes his food and does tend to get a little portly.

    On that topic, I know the typical Paso conformation is not appealing to some people, but the size of the body is irrelevant to the size of the legs. I've never seen a bowed tendon on a Paso, I can count on one hand the number of abscesses I've seen on any Paso in 10+ years of being in the breed. I can count on one hand the number of field injuries I've seen on our 2 dozen horses (two -- one caused by a kick through the fence by the TB next door, one mystery cut on a broodmare) These horses are incredibly hardy and were bred to travel. Really, the main thing that causes soundness issues in this breed is founder due to overfeeding. They really are airferns and do best on limited pasture and a handful of grain, if that.

    Pasos are smart, sensitive, athletic horses and they are less forgiving than other breeds of mistreatment. Sadly there are plenty of jerks out there that think they can 'win' by applying more force. On the other hand there are also a lot of middle-aged (and older) riders of moderate riding skills that enjoy their Pasos. As with every other breed, dangerous to overgeneralize based on encounters with a few individuals.

    (I do like your 'ride with the devil' comment tho -- may need to steal that!)


    4 members found this post helpful.

  17. #57
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    Oct. 8, 2002
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    Maryland
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    Quote Originally Posted by Absolut Equestrian View Post
    I was in for quite a shock when we started to move faster! His legs seemed to be going a million miles an hour, while we merely inched slowly forward. I could. not. stop. giggling.
    Exactly my reaction the first time I rode one! Had a ball, and boy was it a comfy ride!
    "smile a lot can let us ride happy,it is good thing"

    My CANTER blog.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  18. #58
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    Mar. 16, 2000
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    Chatham, NY USA
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    "They are a wonderfully comfortable ride, and if I ever have back trouble I'd consider getting one, but to be honest, I got bored with them pretty quick. That's all they do. Yes, they can trot and canter too if you want them to, but essentially they only have one trick. (I know people do lots of different things with them, don't think that I'm saying that's all they are able to do. JMO.) Now, if all I wanted to do was trail ride and drink on horseback, they're the ones to have! "

    I don't think so! Check out Nola Haupert-Keill's Ro-No Ranch. http://www.ro-noranch.com/. Her black & white stallion jumps, she competes in Cowboy Mounted Shooting on another (see Stallions page), they trail, if a horse can do it, hers do it.

    Carol
    www.ayliprod.com
    Equine Photography in the Northeast



  19. #59
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    Mar. 16, 2000
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    Chatham, NY USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by SmartAlex View Post
    Once, at the NY State Breeders show, my mother and I were admiring a dark dark dapple grey Paso who was standing tied outside of his stall. The Hispanic trainer wanted us to ride him immediately. His owner, did not want her horse giving pony rides before her class (understandable) so the trainer got out a 3 yr old grey stallion (not as gorgeous, but very lovely) and saddled him up for us.

    He turned us completely loose on that colt and encouraged us to ride him anywhere we wanted. The gaits were amazing, the colt's manners impeccable. I would not hesitate to ride or buy a Paso if another one ever crossed my path. I often note them when they show up on the broker pages. There was a pretty mare just this week.
    Yes - and this is NOT unusual. I had a young (mid-teen) assistant at the first PF show I videoed and she was drooling. I didn't really know anyone there, but talked to the show secretary and she pointed me in the direction of a trainer she thought would have an appropriate horse for Sara to ride (she was a pretty good little rider). So I introduced myself, explained what I was wondering about (Sara was not with me), and he said, "Sure - come back during lunch break." And didn't he bring out a cute little 5 yo stallion, set her up, gave her a couple hints and sent her up & down the road (dirt/on a fairground). He saw she could ride, gave her some PF pointers and told her to go ride around - for as long as she wanted. I don't know which of us was more surprised - about the stallion, the attitude, ??? - but she had a BLAST!

    Another excellent rider attended a show we were videoing and said "WOW - that's wild. I'd love to try that!" I talked to a friend/trainer - told her to come back after the last class. He hopped off the show champion performance stallion and told her to get on - do this, do that - go have fun.

    You just don't find this enthusiasm to market your product in ANY other breed/ discipline.

    Carol
    www.ayliprod.com
    Equine Photography in the Northeast


    2 members found this post helpful.

  20. #60
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    Jul. 3, 2012
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    Our Morgans show with them at a couple of shows. They can be real pistols when they get their panties in a wad. One got his door open, left the fairgrounds and managed to get clear across town...5 miles before he would get caught.

    Harry finds all that rat-tat-tatting coming up behind him to be QUITE UNSETTLING...this from a guy who faced a forklift coming out of a dark barn right at him; merely turned to the side and got out of the way.


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